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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 15 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Otway Watson or search for Otway Watson in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
the river, occupied and fortified a prominent ridge covering Powers' Ferry. The rest of the corps having crossed and taken up position, the 14th, 15th and 16th were occupied in building a bridge over the Chattahoochee. This was well done by Major Watson, Seventy-fifth Illinois, with the pioneers and Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry. On the morning of the 18th we marched for Atlanta, following Newton's division and marching by way of Buck Head. We encamped at Buck Head that night, and next morn Champion and Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, Ninetysixth Illinois, were all severely wounded in the fight of Whitaker's brigade on the 20th of June. Major Dufficy, Thirty-fifth Indiana, a gallant and daring officer, was mortally wounded, and Lieutenant-Colonel Watson, Fortieth Ohio, captured in the same affair. Lieutenant-Colonel Neff, Thirty-first Indiana, a most excellent officer, was killed by one of those chance bullets so destructive to us during our occupation of the trenches in front of Kene
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
dvanced my front line and again threw up strong works; the: enemy's position was such that he could enfilade as far as the range of his guns our lines, right and left. I was ordered to dislodge him. My skirmishers, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Watson, were strengthened and advanced. The Twenty-first Kentucky, Colonel Price commanding, was ordered to storm the first line of works. The Fifty-first Ohio, Colonel McClain, was ordered to support, while the pioneers of the brigade were ded, and missing. The enemy's loss was reported to me by prisoners to be between 500 and 600 killed and over 1,000 wounded. We fought their best troops and drove them from an important position, and held it firmly. Among the missing is Lieutenant-Colonel Watson, of the Fortieth Ohio, who in the darkness charged into the rebel lines and with several of his men were surrounded and captured. He is a very valuable officer. Colonel Price was wounded severely. Colonel Champion and Lieutenant-Colo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
to mention in this report. In the list of wounded are Lieut. Col. D. B. Warner, One hundred and Thirteenth Ohio Infantry; Capt. Henry O. Mansfield, Fifty-second Ohio Infantry; Captain Durant, One hundred and Thirteenth Ohio Infantry; Adjt. C. N. Andrus, Eiglty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; Lieut. Samuel T. Rogers, Eighty-sixth Illinois Infantry; Captain Vanantwerp, Eighty-sixth Illinois Infantry; Captain Howden, Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry; Lieutenants Lippincott, Bentley. Baxter, Watson, and Dungan, of the One hundred and Thirteenth Ohio Infantry; and Lieutenants Thomas and Lindsey, of the Ninety. eighth Ohio Infantry. These gallant officers fell in leading their men to the enemy's works, some of them at the ditches. On the morning of the 3d of July the division moved in pursuit of the enemy, again in retreat. Passing through Marietta and following the Twentieth Corps, went into bivouac at Nickajack Creek, in sight of the enemy's works at that place. July 4, opened
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 128 (search)
t-general, merits promotion; I ask it for him. Lieutenant Coe, my acting assistant quartermaster, and Lieutenant Pyatt, my brigade acting commissary of subsistence, for long and faithful discharge of their respective duties, also deserve promotion. I have had occasion in previous reports to mention these officers; they are honest, vigilant, and every way qualified. Captain Stinson, provost-marshal, Captain Race, acting assistant inspector-general, Lieutenant Waterman, aide-de-camp, and Surgeon Watson, of my old brigade staff, are all good officers and have faithfully discharged their respective duties. I have found Captain Orr, commissary of subsistence, and Lieutenant Scroggs, ordnance officer, both officers of merit and thoroughly acquainted with their respective duties. Major Petri, topographical engineer, a valuable and scientific officer in his staff department, has also been very attentive and vigilant in the performance of his duties. I forward herewith brigade and regim
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 142 (search)
guns captured by the Seventy-eighth Illinois, but received no response from the enemy. They had left during the night. None but the dead and a few wounded were found on the field. September 2, we moved into Jonesborough, and our fighting campaign was ended. Our casualties in this engagement were small in comparison with the exposure. Our loss was 3 killed and 7 wounded. I submit the following table, which recapitulates the casualties during the entire campaign: Zzz To Capt. Otway Watson, who acted as second in command, I am much indebted for his cordial co-operation and active assistance in the management of the regiment. In conclusion, I can only say that every officer and man of the regiment during the time it was under my command, and, so far as my own observation extends, during the entire campaign, exhibited under all circumstances a willingness to perform any duty and incur any danger for the common good, which should secure for them any reward those in auth
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 178 (search)
y a musketball. Marched July 22 and took position within two miles of Atlanta, where we remained twelve days. Fired at intervals during this period, directing most of our shots at the city and the rebel works in front. August 4, moved three miles to the right, and, by your order, took position in front of General Baird's division, from which point we did not open until the 6th. Made several demonstrations at times by order of General Baird. Sergeant Kitzmiller, Corpl. McPheeters, and Privates Watson and Mann were wounded in this position on the 7th, 2 of them by shells and 2 by musketry. Remained here until the night of the 26th, when we withdrew under the fire of the rebel batteries, and marched several miles to the right. From the 27th to the evening of the 30th short marches were made, and nothing of interest occurred. On the morning of the 31st moved out to the line with Colonel Walker's brigade, Third Division, and threw a number of shells at a large rebel wagon train, whic