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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
land; 3,600 at Beaufort; 1,400 on Edisto, and the rest at other points. The force on Edisto was advanced to the northern part of the island, with a strong guard on Little Edisto, which touches the mainland and is cut off from the large island by Watts' cut and a creek running across its northern neck. Communication with the large island from Little Edisto is by a bridge and causeway, about the middle of the creek's course. This being the situation, General Evans, commanding the Third distrieutenant and 20 men and noncommissioned officers, the remainder of the force escaping in the fog. Colonel Stevens marched within sound of the long roll beating in the camps in the interior, and taking a few prisoners, returned to the mainland by Watts' cut, and Palmer crossed his command and prisoners over at the north end of Little Edisto in a small boat, which could only carry five men at a time, flats which were on the way to him having failed to arrive. Several of the Federal soldiers wer
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
ept at my command. Boyce lost 15 horses. Sergt. Thomas E. Dawkins and Private James Rogers were killed, Privates B. Miller and E. Shirley mortally wounded, and Lieut. H. F. Scaife and 15 of the battery more or less severely wounded. Sergt. B. T. Glenn continued to work his piece long after receiving a very severe wound. Captain Boyce mentions all his officers, Lieutenants Jeter, Porter, Scaife and Monro, and Sergeants Glenn, Humphreys, Bunch, and Young, and Corporals Rutland, Byrd, Watts and Schartle; and Privates Scaife, Garner, Hodges, Shirley, Simpson, Gondelock, A. Sim, L. H. Sims, Willard, Peek, Gossett and Franklin, for distinguished gallantry in the battles from the Rappahannock to Antietam. Colonel McMaster, of the Seventeenth South Carolina, Evans' brigade, reports that he carried into the battle only 59 officers and men, so great had been his losses from sickness and wounds and straggling. Out of these he lost 19 in battle. There are no separate returns of th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
Wilcox's Landing, and numerous others. He was once captured, but escaped, and was several times slightly wounded, his most severe wound being received in the vicinity of Richmond, when a piece of shell struck him in the breast, breaking the bone. Since the war his occupation has been that of a farmer. He is a member of Camp Garlington, of Laurens. He has served one term in the State legislature. He was married December 22, 1868, to N. Emily Watts, of Laurens county, daughter of Col. J. Washington Watts and a descendant of Col. James Williams, one of the heroes of King's Mountain, who there gave his life for the cause of American independence. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have six living children, three sons and three daughters. Capt. James W. Davis, brother of John C., served during the war as first sergeant of Company B, James' battalion. He led his company in the battle of South Mountain in the absence of the other officers and was there killed September 12, 1862. He left a widow, Ma