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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 31 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 3 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Francis Wayland or search for Francis Wayland in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
of Jesus really live in accordance with that doctrine (Count Leo Tolstoi's My religion, New York, 1885, pp. 214, 215, 221). with the robbing of the poor, with worldliness and ambition, with a participation in all popular iniquities. Hence, when abolitionism declares that no man can love God who enslaves another, they deny it, and assert that man-stealing and Christianity may co-exist in the same character. On Aug. 30, 1841, Henry C. Wright wrote to Edmund Quincy: I once met Rev. Francis Wayland, D. D., President of Brown University, in the presence of several friends, to converse on the subject of slavery. The conversation turned on the question—Can a slaveholder be a Christian? To bring it to a point, addressing myself to the Doctor, I asked him— Can a man be a Christian and claim a right to sunder husbands and wives, parents and children—to compel men to work without wages—to forbid them to read the Bible, and buy and sell them—and who habitually does these things? Yes, ans
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. It was all very well to hang Douglas in effigy—for Lib. 24.38, 51, 55, 59, 63. legislatures to protest, and eleven hundred women led by Mrs. Stowe to remonstrate, and the New England clergy to Lib. 24.33, 35; Ms. Feb. (18?), 1854, Mrs. Stowe to W. L. G. Lib. 24:[42], 57. come out in a petition more than three thousand strong, embracing the chiefs of all the denominations and the most conspicuous censors of the abolitionists, like Lyman Lib. 24.57. Beecher, Francis Wayland, and Leonard Bacon. This memorial was received by the pro-slavery press North and South with the utmost contumely (Lib. 24: 50, 53), and with marked coarseness by Senator Douglas (Lib. 24: [42], 54). All this, wrote Mr. Garrison, is equally instructive and refreshing. For more than twenty years, the clergy of New England have denounced the abolitionists as lacking in sound judgment, good temper, Christian courtesy, and brotherly kindness, in their treatment of the question of Slaver