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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 86 38 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 50 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 41 7 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 40 20 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 36 10 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 31 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 3 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 14 10 Browse Search
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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, V. Life in log huts. (search)
ne? Well, if the troops were camping near a brook, that simplified the matter somewhat; but even then the clothes must be boiled, and for this purpose there was but one resource--the mess kettles. There is a familiar anecdote related of Daniel Webster: that while he was Secretary of State, the French Minister at Washington asked him whether the United States would recognize the new government of France — I think Louis Napoleon's. Assuming a very solemn tone and posture, Webster replied: Why nWebster replied: Why not? The United States has recognized the Bourbons, the French Republic, the Directory, the Council of Five Hundred, the First Consul, the Emperor, Louis XVIII., Charles X., Louis Philippe, the --Enough! Enough! cried the minister, fully satisfied with the extended array of precedents cited. So in regard to using our mess kettles to boil clothes in, it might be asked Why not? Were they not used to boil our meat and Cleaning up. potatoes in, to make our bean, pea, and meat soups in, to boi
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 3 (search)
d a nice discrimination of details. As a politician he attaches the utmost importance to consistency — and here I differ with him. I think that to be consistent as a politician, is to change with the circumstances of the case. When Calhoun and Webster first met in Congress, the first advocated a protective tariff and the last opposed it. This was told me by Mr. Webster himself, in 1842, when he was Secretary of State; and it was confirmed by Mr. Calhoun in 1844, then Secretary of State himselMr. Webster himself, in 1842, when he was Secretary of State; and it was confirmed by Mr. Calhoun in 1844, then Secretary of State himself. Statesmen are the physicians of the public weal; and what doctor hesitates to vary his remedies with the new phases of disease? When the President had completed the reading of my papers, and during the perusal I observed him make several emphatic nods, he asked me what I wanted. I told him I wanted employment with my pen, perhaps only temporary employment. I thought the correspondence of the Secretary of War would increase in volume, and another assistant besides Major Tyler would be
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
ns of such high standing, without the clearest evidence of guilt. Mr. Custis had signed the ordinance of secession, and that ought to be sufficient evidence of his loyalty. December 9 Gen. Winder informed me to-day that he had been ordered to release Mr. Custis; and I learned that the Secretary of War had transmitted orders to Gen. Huger to permit him to pass over the bay. December 10 Nothing new. December 11 Several of Gen. Winder's detectives came to me with a man named Webster, who, it appears, has been going between Richmond and Baltimore, conveying letters, money, etc. I refused him a passport. He said he could get it from the Secretary himself, but that it was sometimes difficult in gaining access to him. I told him to get it, then; I would give him none. December 12 More of Gen. Winder's men came with a Mr. Stone, whom they knew and vouched for, and who wanted a passport merely to Norfolk. I asked if it was not his design to go farther. They said yes
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIII. April, 1862 (search)
s Gen. Sydney Johnston. Dibble, the traitor. enemy at Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April 1 Gen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolved on Gen. Beauregard, whose recent defense at Island Noor at least prevent more injury to it, from the wicked facility hitherto enjoyed by spies to leave the country. April 10 The condemned spies have implicated Webster, the letter-carrier, who has had so many passports. He will hang, probably. Gen. Winder himself, and his policemen, wrote home by him. I don't believe him any mmeful that martial law should be playing such fantastic tricks before high heaven, when the enemy's guns are booming within hearing of the capital? April 24 Webster has been tried, condemned, and hung. April 25 Gen. Wise, through the influence of Gen. Lee, who is a Christian gentleman as well as a consummate general, ha
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xii. (search)
resident Harrison's and President Taylor's cabinet. Those men, said he, were, you know, when elected, both of advanced years, -sages. Ewing had received, in some way, the nickname of Old Solitude. Soon after the formation of Taylor's cabinet, Webster and Ewing happened to meet at an evening party. As they approached each other, Webster, who was in fine spirits, uttered, in his deepest bass tones, the wellknown lines,-- O Solitude, where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face? Webster, who was in fine spirits, uttered, in his deepest bass tones, the wellknown lines,-- O Solitude, where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face? The evening of Tuesday I dined with Mr. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury, of whom I painted a portrait in 1855, upon the close of his term as United States Senator. He said during the dinner, that, shortly after the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg, the President told this story at a cabinet meeting. Thad. Stevens was asked by some one, the morning of the day appointed for that ceremony, where the President and Mr. Seward were going. To Gettysburg, was the reply. But where ar
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxxvii. (search)
uments, and picked up what I could of law in the intervals of other work. But your question reminds me of a bit of education I had, which I am bound in honesty to mention. In the course of my law-reading, I constantly came upon the word demonstrate. I thought at first that I understood its meaning, but soon became satisfied that I did not. I said to myself, What do I mean when I demonstrate more than when I reason or prove? How does demonstration differ from any other proof? I consulted Webster's Dictionary. That told of certain proof, proof beyond the possibility of doubt; but I could form no idea what sort of proof that was. I thought a great many things were proved beyond a possibility of doubt, without recourse to any such extraordinary process of reasoning as I understood demonstration to be. I consulted all the dictionaries and books of reference I could find, but with no better results. You might as well have defined blue to a blind man. At last I said, Lincoln, you can n
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, LXXIX. (search)
ng,--a tricky man; but his was the walk of caution and firmness. In sitting down on a common chair he was no taller than ordinary men. His legs and arms were, abnormally, unnaturally long, and in undue proportion to the balance of his body. It was only when he stood up that he loomed above other men. Mr. Lincoln's head was long and tall from the base of the brain and from the eyebrows. His head ran backwards, his forehead rising as it ran back at a low angle, like Clay's, and, unlike Webster's, almost perpendicular. The size of his hat, measured at the hatter's block, was 7 1/8, his head being, from ear to ear, 6 1/2 inches, and from the front to the back of the brain 8 inches. Thus measured, it was not below the medium size. His forehead was narrow but high; his hair was dark, almost black, and lay floating where his fingers or the winds left it, piled up at random. His cheek-bones were high, sharp, and prominent; his eyebrows heavy and prominent; his jaws were long, upcurv
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
9. R. Randall, ex-Governor, (Wis.,) 305. Raymond, 95, 129. Red River disaster, 55. Religious character, 185. Root General, 70. Root Hog Story, 211. S. Scott, General, 34. Seward, Secretary, 22, 69, 223, 242; on Clay and Webster, 71; on Equestrian Statues, 71; on Emancipation, 72; on Mr. Lincoln, 81; Seward and Lincoln, 290; the last interview, 290; first knowledge of the President's death, 291. Seymour, General, 48. Shakspeare, 49, 115, 150, 162. Shannon, Ho. Stone, Dr., 81. Swayne, (Sculptor,) 59. T. Taylor, B. F., 154. Thompson, George, 75. Thompson, Rev. J. P., 143, 186, 259. Tilton, 89, 167, 196. V. Van Alen, 173. Vinton, Rev., Francis, 117. W. Wade and Davis, 145. Wadsworth, General, 270. Washington, raid on, 301. Webster, 37, 71, 130. Welles, Secretary, 232. Wetmore, P. M., 140. Wilderness battles, 30. Wilkeson, 101. Willets, Rev., 187. Willis, N. P., 115. Y. Yates, Governor, 267. The End.
inciple of the Nebraska bill, the doctrine of leaving each State and Territory free to decide its institutions for itself, as the only means by which the peace of the country could be preserved and the Union perpetuated,--I pledged him, on that death-bed of his, that so long as I lived my energies should be devoted to the vindication of that principle, and of his fame as connected with it. I gave the same pledge to the great expounder of the Constitution, he who has been called the god-like Webster. I looked up to Clay and him as a son would to a father, and I call upon the people of Illinois, and the people of the whole Union, to bear testimony, that never since the sod has been laid upon the graves of these eminent statesmen have I failed, on any occasion, to vindicate the principle with which the last great, crowning acts of their lives were identified, or to vindicate their names whenever they have been assailed; and now my life and energy are devoted to this great work as the me
s last moments, in order that the genius of popular sovereignty might duly descend from the dying man and settle upon him, the living and most worthy successor. He could do no less than promise that he would devote the remainder of his life to popular sovereignty ; and then the great statesman departs in peace. By this part of the plan of the campaign, the Judge has evidently promised himself that tears shall be drawn down the cheeks of all Old Whigs, as large as half-grown apples. Mr. Webster, too, was mentioned; but it did not quite come to a death-bed scene, as to him. It would be amusing, if it were not disgusting, to see how quick these compromise-breakers administer on the political elects of their dead adversaries, trumping up claims never before heard of, and dividing the assets among themselves. If I should be found dead to-morrow morning, nothing but my insignificance could prevent a speech being made on my authority, before the end of next week. It so happens that
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