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Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- (search)
hting of the fourth division with splendid effect. Tenth. I would commend the highly meritorious conduct and courage in the engagement of Lieut-Com. N. E. Mason, the executive officer, whose presence everywhere over the ship during its continuance did much to secure the good result of this ship's part in the victory. Eleventh. The navigator, Lieut. A. C. Hodgson, and the division officers, Lieut. T. D. Griffin, Lieut. W. P. Rush, Lieut. Edward Simpson, Lieut. J. G. Doyle, and Ensign Charles Webster, and the junior divisional officers were most steady and conspicuous in every detail of duty, contributing to the accurate firing of this ship in their part of the great victory of your forces. Twelfth. The officers of the medical, pay, and engineer and marine corps responded to every demand of the occasion, and were fearless in exposing themselves. The warrant officers, Boatswain William L. Hill, Carpenter G. H. Warford, and Gunner F. T. Applegate, were everywhere exposed in
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Contents. (search)
s parting advice when he leaves Home, 28. Mischievous Trick at the Cider Barrel, 28. He nearly harpoons his Uncle, 29. He nearly kills a Fellow Apprentice, 29. Adventure with a young Woman, 31. His first Slave Case, 33. His Youthful Love for Sarah Tatum, 36. Nicholas Waln, 37. Mary Ridgeway, 38. William Savery, 38. His early Religious Experience, 43. Letter from Joseph Whitall, 44. He marries Sarah Tatum, 46. His interest in Colored People, 47. Charles Webster, 48. Ben Jackson, 51. Thomas Cooper, 55. A Child Kidnapped, 66. Wagelma, 70. James Poovey, 73. Romaine, 77. David Lea, 80. The Slave Hunter, 80. William Bachelor, 83. Levin Smith, 88. Etienne Lamaire, 91. Samuel Johnson, 96. Pierce Butler's Ben, 98. Daniel Benson, 104. The Quick-Witted Slave, 108. James Davis, 112. Mary Holliday, 116. Thomas Harrison, 122. James Lawler, 123. William Anderson, 126. Sarah Roach, 129. Zeke,
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Charles Webster. (search)
Charles Webster. in 1797, a wealthy gentleman from Virginia went to spend the winter in Philadelphia, accompanied by his wife and daughter. He had a slave named Charles Webster, whom he took with him as coachman and waiter. When they had been in the city a few weeks, Charles called upon Isaac T. Hopper, and inquired whether he had become free in consequence of his master's bringing him into Pennsylvania. It was explained to him, that if he remained there six months, with his master's kCharles Webster, whom he took with him as coachman and waiter. When they had been in the city a few weeks, Charles called upon Isaac T. Hopper, and inquired whether he had become free in consequence of his master's bringing him into Pennsylvania. It was explained to him, that if he remained there six months, with his master's knowledge and consent, he would then be a free man, according to the laws of Pennsylvania. The slave was quite disheartened by this information; for he supposed his owner was well acquainted with the law, and would therefore be careful to take him home before that term expired. I am resolved never to return to Virginia, said he. Where can I go to be safe? Friend Hopper told him his master might be ignorant of the law, or forgetful of it. He advised him to remain with the family until he s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Goochland Light Dragoons. (search)
nnon's Wharf and captured, Charles Lacy, W. F. Lewis, R. J. Saving, Hiter Loving, died 1862, John Laddin, killed near Lee Town, Mike McPhalin, John C. Miller, discharged 1862, Chastine Miller, killed at Williamsburg, Va., Joseph H. Malory, wounded at Five Forks and captured, William Morris, Samuel Mosby, Richard Messenger, Polk Nuckols, P. O. Nuckols, W. H. Parrish, B. F. Parrish, Napoleon B. Perkins, Morton Payne, William Pleasants, Alonzo Pleasants, John Pleasants, dead, John Palmore, John Quigley, dead, N. M. Ragland, dead, John C. Ragland, John W. Randolph,—— Ring, Marcellas Shelton, killed at Lee Town, Va., E. Newell Sims, dead; Thomas J. Sims, wounded at Wilderness,——Savage, Tomolin Price, R. A. Trice (Louisa Dick), William J. Trice, dead, Robert H. Trice,——Terrill, Ben Trice, dead, N. S. Thurman, last heard of in Kentucky, William Fourman, John Talley, Philip Taylor, Charles Webster, residence unknown, William James Wright, Richard A. Wise, Isaac Williams and Robert
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
resented us. We love and respect him, for he truly represented us in his political life. He became a member of Congress in 1845, resigning the next year to serve in Mexico. Upon his return from the war he became United States Senator. He was eight years a member of the Senate, during the most brilliant epoch of its history, where he sustained himself as an equal in debate with the most illustrious statesmen in American history. He held his own with Chase and Douglas, Benton and Clay, Webster and Calhoun. As Secretary of War he never had his superior. During his administration the routes of the Pacific railroad were surveyed, the Capitol was extended, iron gun-carriages were introduced, the system of casting heavy guns changed, and the use of coarser grains of powder for artillery was begun. The army was enlarged by four regiments. The dictates of politics were disregarded in his official appointments. Mr. Davis was opposed to disunion, and did his utmost to prevent th