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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 3: birth and early Education.—1811-26. (search)
d, children, as they came one after the other, were always welcomed in that household. Charles was first taught in a private infant school, kept by his maternal aunt, Miss Hannah R. Jacob, in the upper room of his father's house. Perry's and Webster's Spelling Books and the Child's Assistant were then the primary school-books. It is not likely that he remained at his aunt's school when he was older than six or seven. For some time before his admission to the Latin School he attended the Wlies for a cadetship for his son Charles at West Point. This letter shows that the father's purpose to send his son to college was not formed immediately after his appointment as sheriff. The interesting part of the letter (in which he gives Mr. Webster and Judge Story as his own references) is as follows:— My oldest son, Charles Sumner, is desirous of being admitted a member of the Military Academy at West Point. He will be fifteen years old in January next. He is of a good constitution
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
e close of a lecture by Chief-Justice Shaw, Mr. Webster opened the envelope in presence of the audiwards sent to Sumner, with a note signed by Mr. Webster, certifying that they were awarded as a pree, who came from Salem for the purpose, heard Webster's tariff speech, which was begun at Faneuil Hy to the murder of Stephen White. He heard Mr. Webster's closing argument for the government. It ith a peroration of surpassing pathos, that Mr. Webster, alluding to the suggestion that the jury sanklin Dexter, the defendant's counsel, and Mr. Webster are given in Commonwealth v. Knapp, 10 PickReports, p. 477. The celebrated argument of Mr. Webster on the earlier trial of John F. Knapp as prs, Vol. II. pp. 41-105. See Curtis's Life of Webster, Vol. I. pp. 378-385. Rev. Dr. Emery, a Mr. W. H. Gardiner were Knapp's counsel, and Webster was on the side of the State. The trial attr; by so doing you may redeem the pledge which Webster says the public hold of you. Tower, Stearns
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
uilt edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of ouiews raised at all above the ephemeral politics with which we are annoyed. Wednesday eve. Since I wrote the above, two whole days have passed. I have heard Webster's performance The class oration of Fletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, at the exhibition is referred to. and like it much. He did himself honor with matuFletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, at the exhibition is referred to. and like it much. He did himself honor with mature men. As for undergraduates, I suppose they were dissatisfied, for they could find no brilliancies or points or attractive allusions. It was characterized by judgment, sense, and great directness and plainness of speech. It had no exaggerated thoughts or expressions, but was full of simple thoughts expressed in the simplest la
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
have three men of equal fame as orators with Webster, Calhoun, and Clay ever contended with each oe there, he should associate with such men as Webster; trusted next spring that he should visit theters' Reports, p. 201.—Key, Walter Jones, and Webster on one side, and Coxe and Swann on the other. Selden on one side and Charles G. Loring and Webster on the other side. It was Loring's first app he acquitted himself honorably, drawing from Webster a practical compliment, dictated probably as read. John Sergeant is Peters' counsel, and Webster, Wheaton's. The brief of Mr. Webster's argMr. Webster's argument in Wheaton v. Peters, 8 Peters' Reports, p. 591, was taken by Mr. Peters, the reporter, from or of which I received an introduction from Mr. Webster; in other words, he gave me a card which gisubject is directly before them by means of Mr. Webster's great report as Chairman of the Finance CBoston, and also introduced his bank-bill. Webster's Works, Vol. IV. pp. 82-102. This last will[2 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
eometry and of Introduction to American Law. He died, in 1856, at the age of fifty-three. left there an hour or two before I arrived. I saw his open, smiling visage in the stage as I was within a mile of the falls. I met D. F. Webster, Fletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, from whose name the first Christian name was afterwards dropped. for one minute, while changing horses at Geneva, in the centre of New York. It was a most agreeable rencontre. You may send this letter to my sister. nts in the celebrated case of The Charles River Bridge v. The Warren Bridge, 11 Peters' Reports, p. 420,—a case which settled the doctrine that public grants should be construed strictly. This view was supported by Professor Greenleaf against Mr. Webster, the counsel for the plaintiffs. Some conservative people (among them Judge Story, who dissented) regarded the decision as contrary to the Constitution and perilling rights of property. Story's Life and Letters, Vol. II. pp. 262-273. Mr
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
important. M. Laborde, on one side, made what I thought a very beautiful speech,—animated, flowing, French. He used a brief, which appeared to contain the quotations only which he made; I think the whole argument had been written out and committed to memory. Dupin was dry and quiet in his delivery, having his whole argument written out, and reading it without pretending to look off his paper. Sumner wrote to Judge Story, April 21, that Dupin, the first lawyer of France, is not equal to Webster. He appeared here, as in the Chamber of Deputies, vulgar. The room in which the Cour de Cassation met was quite rich. The judges, as I counted them, were fifteen. Zzz A, a desk and bench not occupied on ordinary occasions; reserved, I believe, for the presence of the king. B, the king's seat. C, the benches occupied by the court ordinarily. D, the seat of the President. E, the seat of the Procureur-General, at the left of whom was Brougham. F, greffier. G, aisle be
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
or rather, I am for entrusting to the people the largest possible degree of power. I doubt if he knows much about our affairs or our public men. When I mentioned Webster's name, he said, Yes, I have understood that Webster is a clever man; and Clay's did not seem to call up any particular idea. Of Judge Story he spoke more at lenWebster is a clever man; and Clay's did not seem to call up any particular idea. Of Judge Story he spoke more at length than of any other, and expressed the strongest regard for him; and yet I do not think that he is aware of the Judge's position among us, and I know that he is ignorant of several of his works. He did not speak of the law, though when I saw him at his house in Belgrave Square he said, Come and see me, and we will talk about cod ably mastered by one who understood his duty and the law, and did not shrink from laying before the jury his opinions. Alderson's voice and manner remind me of Webster more than those of anybody I have seen here; his features are large, but his hair, eyes, and complexion are light. You ask why does not some one interfere and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
any question about it? The only practical point will be whether you will bring yourself down to the work. If your head can bear the transition, you will have no difficulty. You will only have to contend with the embarrassment of your riches. Joseph R. Ingersoll wrote, April 22:— It has given me great delight to learn, as I have learned from various sources, how distinguished has been your reception and how agreeable your career abroad. As long as gentlemen like yourself and Mr. Webster are the representatives of the country, we are perfectly safe in the belief that we shall gain largely in reputation, and in the hope that we may at length persuade the most reluctant out of their prejudices against us. John O. Sargent wrote, May 8:— Your visit has almost tempted me to envy you, for it has been flattering to a degree beyond any thing you had reason to expect,—the most flattering probably enjoyed by any American since time began. Professor Greenleaf wrote, Se<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
as the author of any book! Everybody is laughing at Willis's sketch, in a late New York Mirror, of Lord Durham. Marryat says that when Willis looked over his spoon, one spoon looked over another. Lady Blessington says it is all false, as also does Fonblanque, who was at the dinner. I have seen Disraeli. . . . Captain Marryat has returned full of blood and fury. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
as the author of any book! Everybody is laughing at Willis's sketch, in a late New York Mirror, of Lord Durham. Marryat says that when Willis looked over his spoon, one spoon looked over another. Lady Blessington says it is all false, as also does Fonblanque, who was at the dinner. I have seen Disraeli. . . . Captain Marryat has returned full of blood and fury. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts o
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