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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
s Hopkins. Unattached loss: w, 18; m, 4 = 22. Tenth division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Jackson (k). Staff loss: k, 1. Thirty-third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William R. Terrill (k), Col. Albert S. Hall: 80th Ill., Col. Thomas G. Allen; 123d Ill., Col. James Monroe; Detachments 7th and 32d Ky. and 3d Tenn., Col. Theophilus T. Garrard; 105th Ohio, Col. Albert S. Hall; Parsons's (improvised) Battery, Lieut. Charles C. Parsons. Brigade loss: k, 100; w, 336; m, 91 = 527. Thirty-fourth Brigade, Col. George Webster (k): 80th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Lewis Brooks; 50th Ohio, Col. Jonah R. Taylor, Lieut.-Col. Silas A. Strickland; 98th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Christian L. Poorman; 121st Ohio, Col. William P. Reid; 19th Ind. Battery, Capt. Samuel J. Harris. Brigade loss: k, 87; w, 346; m, 146 = 579. Second Army Corps, Of the operations of this corps General Buell says, in his official report: The corps of General Crittenden closed in, and Wagner's brigade, of Wood's division, became engaged and did good ser
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
t the close. which ended at dark, when the Confederates, who had chosen their position for battle, were repulsed at all points. So ended the destructive battle of Perryville, or Chaplin's Hills, as it is sometimes called. Buell reported his effective force which advanced on Perryville, 58,000, of whom 22,000 were raw troops. He reported a loss in this battle of 4,348, of whom 916 were killed, 2,943 wounded, and 489 missing. Among the killed were Generals Jackson and Terrell, and Colonel George Webster, of the Ninety-eighth Ohio, who commanded a brigade. The Confederate loss is supposed to have been nearly the same as that of the Nationals in number. Bragg claimed to have captured fifteen guns and four hundred prisoners. Preparations were made by the Nationals for a renewal of the conflict in the morning. Gilbert and Crittenden moved early for that purpose, but during the night the Confederates had retired in haste to Harrodsburg, where Bragg was joined by Kirby Smith and Genera
at their very first volley, Maj.-Gen. James S. Jackson Union Member of Congress from the IId district of Kentucky; elected in 1861, by 9,281 votes, to 3,364 for Bunch, State rights, i e., semi-Rebel. fell dead. His fall disorganized the raw and over-matched brigade of Gen. Terrill, which he was desperately exerting himself to steady, and it gave way in utter panic; Gen. Terrill himself following his chief's example and sharing his fate not long afterward; as did, at a later hour, Col. George Webster, 98th Ohio, commanding a brigade. Terrill's brigade being thus instantaneously routed, with the loss of Parsons's battery, the whole force of the Rebel charge fell upon Rousseau, who was ready to receive it. An attempt to flank and crush his left was promptly met by new dispositions: Starkweather's brigade, with Stone's and Bush's batteries, being faced to that flank, and receiving the enemy with volley after volley, which tore his ranks and arrested his momentum for two or three h
omposed of Colonels who had been entrusted with brigades, and were exercising such commands at the time of their death. They were men of noble spirits, intrepid soldiers, whose gallantry and ability had won the admiration and respect of all. Killed in action. Brigade commanders, with rank of Colonel. Colonel Edward D. Baker, 71st Pennsylvania, Ball's Bluff. Colonel Julius Raith, Mortally wounded. 43d Illinois, Shiloh. Colonel Everett Peabody, 25th Missouri, Shiloh. Colonel George Webster, 98th Ohio, Chaplin Hills. Colonel John A. Koltes, 73d Pennsylvania, Manassas. Colonel William B. Goodrich, 60th New York, Antietam. Colonel George W. Roberts, 42d Illinois, Stone's River. Colonel Frederick Schaefer, 2d Missouri, Stone's River. Colonel George C. Spear, 61st Pennsylvania, Marye's Heights. Colonel David S. Cowles, 128th New York, Port Hudson. Colonel George B. Boomer, 26th Missouri, Vicksburg. Colonel Edward E. Cross, 5th New Hampshire, Gettysbu
r, at New Hope Church, and at Peach Tree Creek. After the fall of Atlanta it marched with Sherman to the sea, and through the Carolinas. Ninety-Eighth Ohio Infantry. Mitchell's Brigade — Davis's Division--Fourteenth Corps. 1) Col. George Webster (Killed). (2) Col. Christian L. Poorman. (3) Col. John S. Pearce; Bvt. Brig.-Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Fi20, 1862. It left the State immediately, and moved into Kentucky, where it was assigned soon after to the Thirty-fourth Brigade, Tenth Division, McCook's Corps, Army of the Ohio, in which command it fought at Chaplin Hills, October 8, 1862. Colonel Webster, who was in command of the brigade, was killed in this battle. General Terrill, who commanded the other brigade in this division, and General Jackson, the dlivision commander, were also killed, while the regiment lost in this, its baptism o<
roclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and rebellion, and by reason thereof the civil authority of the United States is obstructed so that the provisions of the Act to provide increased revenue from imports to pay the interest on the public debt, and for other purposes, approved August fifth, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, cannot be peace ably executed, and that the taxes legally charge able upon real estate under the act last aforesaid, lying within the States and parts of States
life and bring out the murderous double-shot gun to fire upon the hospital-ships — these gentry will find that they can be made to suffer and feel. Our gallant army at Baton Rouge, in their first battle, have behaved like veterans. Let us praise the living and mourn the dead, and cry: Long live the Republic! Death to traitors and aristocrats! Death to the man who stabs our common mother, the Union! If she must die, let us all die with her. Let not a man, woman or child live after her. Webster. A soldier's account. New-Orleans, August 9, 1862. The troops were posted as follows, from right to left: Thirtieth regiment Massachusetts, Sixth Michigan, Twenty-first Indiana, Seventh Vermont, Fourteenth Maine, Ninth Connecticut, Fourth Wisconsin and Fourth Massachusetts battery posted on the left, supported by Ninth Connecticut, and Fourth Wisconsin; Everett's battery, Sixth Massachusetts, supported by Fourteenth Maine and Seventh Vermont; Second Massachusetts battery, Captai
from it — thanks to that reverence for free speech, a free press and the constitutional security of persons and property, which is the fundamental ground-work of the political faith of our Southern patriots, taught them by Washington, Jefferson, Webster, Clay, and their contemporary defenders of self-government. How magnificent has been the exhibition of magnanimity presented by the proclamation of General Smith, (which we publish in another column,) and responded to with a hearty good will byB, although on any other occasion should have been in hospital, led and marched at the head of his company the entire distance, is deserving of all praise, and, being on the right of the regiment, had great influence upon its good conduct. Lieutenant Webster, commanding company D, Lieutenant Burdett, commanding company G, (after Captain Childs was wounded,) Lieutenant McKechnie, commanding company H, Lieutenant Klingsoch, company E, and Lieutenant Powell, company I, all performed their duty in
t-sanctioned, and in some cases instigated, by many of our Union citizens, including even native Kentuckians And how have these wrongs been met in the day of our triumph and the humiliation of the wrong-doers? Has retaliation been resorted to? Far from it — thanks to that reverence for free speech, a free press and the constitutional security of persons and property, which is the fundamental ground-work of the political faith of our Southern patriots, taught them by Washington, Jefferson, Webster, Clay, and their contemporary defenders of self-government. How magnificent has been the exhibition of magnanimity presented by the proclamation of General Smith, (which we publish in another column,) and responded to with a hearty good will by that portion of our community so lately and so ruthlessly oppressed! We do not pretend to say that there are not offenders in the community who are not fully forgiven, and that it may not be necessary to hold some of them to accountability — not
ther part in the action of the day. Captain Leahy, company I, acted in the most gallant manner, seizing and advancing to the foremost front one of our standards, when the regular bearer thereof was killed. Lieutenant Bartholomew, commanding company B, although on any other occasion should have been in hospital, led and marched at the head of his company the entire distance, is deserving of all praise, and, being on the right of the regiment, had great influence upon its good conduct. Lieutenant Webster, commanding company D, Lieutenant Burdett, commanding company G, (after Captain Childs was wounded,) Lieutenant McKechnie, commanding company H, Lieutenant Klingsoch, company E, and Lieutenant Powell, company I, all performed their duty in the most gallant manner, and to my entire satisfaction. Lieutenant Graham, commanding company A, (Captain Graham being sick in hospital,) was wounded, and since had his leg amputated, behaved in the most admirable manner. Lieutenant Horner, acting
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