Your search returned 22 results in 10 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
f the Federals. As it resulted, there was no loss of life on this expedition, and the glamour which generally attends a bloody affair was missing; but it was none the less a dangerous one, and all engaged in it deserve as much credit as if some had been shot. We have made it a rule to mention the names of the participants when good work was performed, and, this being a case in point, the following are entitled to a place: N. A. Blume, Acting-Ensign; William Stevenson, Master-at-Arms; James Webster, Gunner's Mate; Thomas Wallace, Coxswain; Jacob Bowman, Captain Forecastle; William Thompson, Captain Forecastle; Augustus Miller, Captain After-guard; Peter Miller, Seaman; Thomas K. Fenley, Landsman. On January 24th, 1865, quite as clever an affair took place off Calcasieu River, by a cutting-out expedition. under Lieutenant-Commander Richard W. Meade, which was a complete success without any casualties. A three-masted schooner, loaded with cotton, was lying at the second bend of
Rebel cruelty.--A lady in Ulster County, N. Y., writes: We have just received the horrid news of poor James Webster's death. He owned a farm in Virginia, was a Methodist minister, and a quiet Union man. The rebels took him while threshing in his barn, without allowing him even a change of clothing, drove him three days without eating, so that he died. He was my nephew. --New-York Tribune, June 11.
or a tower; And the same mysterious voice said: ‘it is — the Eleventh hour! orderly-Sergeant — Robert Burton — it is the Eleventh hour!’ “Doctor Austin!--what day is this?” --“It is Wednesday night, you know;” “Yes! To-morrow will be New-Year's, and a right good time below! What time is it, Doctor Austin!” --“Nearly twelve:” --“Then don't you go! Can it be that all this happened — all this — not an hour ago! “There was where the gunboats opened on the dark, rebellious host, And where Webster semicircled his last guns upon the coast-- There were still the two log-houses, just the same, or else their ghost-- And the same old transport came and took me over — or its ghost! “And the whole field lay before me, all deserted far and wide-- There was where they fell on Prentiss — there McClernand met the tide , There was where stern Sherman rallied, and where Hurlbut's heroes died-- Lower down, where Wallace charged them, and kept charging till he die
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webster, James (search)
Webster, James British military officer; born about 1743; entered the army, and became major of the 33d Foot in 1771; fought with distinction in the Revolutionary War; and became lieutenantcolonel. He took part in the operations in New Jersey in 1777, at Verplanck's Point in 1778, in Cornwallis's campaign in the South, and in the battle of Guilford, N. C., in 1781. In the latter engagement he was so severely wounded that he died soon afterwards.
ay whatever with a newspaper. A single statement in it, to the effect that General Gates broke down several horses (two or three,) in escaping from the rout of Camden, riveted it upon our memory. We are disposed to think he claimed compensation for a horse which he lost in that engagement, and the price of which had never been paid him. It was at Guildford, we believe, that he saved the life of Col. Mayo. In our boyhood, we recollect seeing an engraving, purporting to have been done by James Webster, in which he is represented as engaged in mortal combat with nine of Tarlton's cavalry, in full view of his whole legion, four hundred strong. The rencontre was said, in the inscription, to have occurred in the county of Amelia, and in the month of June, 1781. There is a mystery about this transaction which, no doubt, Francisco's relatives could clear up. Unquestionably, he was at the siege of Ninety-Six, in South Carolina, for we have heard anecdotes of him while there, and heard of an
Dismissed. --A warrant was gotten out some time since against James Webster and Benjamin Swan, for assaulting one Mary H. Langdon; but strange to say, when the case was called by the Mayor yesterday morning, not a witness appeared, and it was dismissed.
e allowed the City Collector. A resolution was adopted appointing a committee to make arrangements to receive and distribute the salt received from the State agent, and authorizing the President of the Council to draw upon the Auditor for funds to pay for the same. Richard Fox, City Ganger, was authorized to charge 25 cents per cask for gauging or marking spirituous liquors, wine, oil, molasses, vinegar, spirits of turpentine or burning fluid. Petitions were presented from James Webster, Peter Lawson, Jr., and I. Irvin, asking to be licensed as butchers in the 2d Market. A bill of J. H. Gary, of $40, for making a handrailing in the Hustings Court-room, certified by the Court, was ordered to be paid; also, the bill of Dr. P. W. Brown, of $61, for medical attendance on Sam Patch, a free negro, James Coyne, white, and others, wounded and arrested by the police. A communication was made to the Council by Thomas T. Giles, enclosing one from Henry Exall, notifying h
g no proof of the charge. Andrew Lydeer in the city with Louisiana papers, was discharged with instructions to leave. Jacob, slave of Robert J. Wilson, charged with going at large, was committed as a runaway. James Pearce was fined three dollars for being drunk and lying on the sidewalk. Wm. Gray, free, living in the city with Amelia papers, was ordered twenty lashes. Ned Brown, colored, was ordered twenty-five lashes for receiving a quantity of stolen wood. James Webster, charged with being drunk and stealing a foot-mat from Miss Bell Mitchell, was sentenced to 90 days in the chain gang and committed to jail in default of $200 security. A large number of colored individuals, charged with creating and being with an unlawful assembly, were admonished and discharged. J. Hawdy, charged with being drunk and firing a pistol in the streets, was discharged. Berry Amos, charged with feloniously receiving a horse of the value of $200, stolen from Je
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1865., [Electronic resource], Religious duties of masters to slaves. (search)
alled attention to the matter, whereupon another small piece was thrown into his basket. On going to a grocery store soon afterwards, Mr. Smith put the meat, including the extra piece, on a pair of scales, and found that all together lacked two ounces of being a pound and a half. Lawson denied all knowledge of the transaction himself — the meat was sold by James Webster, an employee at his stall. The Mayor continued the case till this morning, in order to procure the attendance of Webster. alled attention to the matter, whereupon another small piece was thrown into his basket. On going to a grocery store soon afterwards, Mr. Smith put the meat, including the extra piece, on a pair of scales, and found that all together lacked two ounces of being a pound and a half. Lawson denied all knowledge of the transaction himself — the meat was sold by James Webster, an employee at his stall. The Mayor continued the case till this morning, in order to procure the attendance of Webster
nd stole their clothes. For the defence, it was proven that Stratton was at home at the time it is alleged the robbery occurred, and remained there all night. In Curtin's case, neither of the complainants were at all positive in recognizing his voice; and his character being shown to be good, the Mayor bailed him for his appearance on Friday. Stratton was committed. Oliver, slave of William H. Pitts, and George, slave of Mr. Taliaferro, charged with breaking into Rev. Charles Minnegerode's dwelling and stealing one barrel of flour and a lot of sugar, bacon, lard, butter, soap and crockery ware, valued at three thousand dollars, were remanded for examination before the Hustings Court. James Webster, an employee of Peter Lawson, butcher in the Second Market, was fined for selling light weight at his stall. Fines were imposed upon several parties for violating city ordinances by permitting water to escape from their hydrants and allowing their servants to go at large.