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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
at remained of the organization of the national army. Between our position and where the enemy had prepared for this last rush, was a ravine which they must cross in the assault, and here the two gunboats took up a position. At the same time Col. Webster, of Gen. Grant's staff, hastily collected some scattered guns and placed them where they would play on the left flank of the enemy's line when they should advance. This was the decisive point in the battle. The next half hour would settle ass with the centre not half a mile from the river. Our men (with the exception of the shameless skulkers) had fought bravely, but were now in a disorganized condition, and it seemed as if their main dependence must now be upon the guns which Col. Webster had collected to check the advance of the enemy. The delay was for a few moments only, and they came preceded by a storm of shot from their batteries which swept over all the intervening space and up to the very banks of the river. As st
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
the tug and proceeded up to General Buckner's headquarters, where I found General Wallace. General Grant arrived about half an hour after the fort had surrendered. * * * Commander Dove seemed to have the proper idea on this occasion in declining to claim anything, as the fort properly fell to the Army. As soon as Flag-officer Foote was able he proceeded with the Conestoga, Lieut.-Com. Phelps, and the Cairo, Lieut.-Com. Bryant, on an armed reconnoissance up the river, taking with him Colonel Webster, Chief of General Grant's staff, who, with Lieut.-Com. Phelps, took possession of the principal works and hoisted the Union flag. Foote had applied to General Halleck for permission to advance up the Cumberland on Nashville, and just as he was about moving for that point Halleck telegraphed to Grant: Don't let the gun-boats proceed higher than Clarksville, an order in keeping with the conservative policy that seemed to influence General Halleck on all occasions. The latter seemed to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
und Lincoln and N. P. Towne; Boatswain, John Marley; Acting-Gunner, C. A. Stevenson; Carpenter, R. A. Williams; Sailmaker, J. H. North. Steamer Penguin. Commander, J. C. Williamson; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. B. Higginbotham; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. C. Cook; Acting-Masters, T. Durham, S. B. Rathbone, G. V. Cassedy and C. H. Rockwell; Acting-Master's Mates, W. E. Anderson, S. E. Foote, W. A. Beattie and W. A. Randlett; Engineers, F. W. Warner, M. P. Randall, A. B. Kinney and John Webster Steam gun-boat Sagamore. Lieutenant-Commander, Earl English; Assistant-Surgeon, W. K. Scofield; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. F. Wood; Acting-Masters, Wm. Fales and Edwin Babson; Acting-Master's Mates, J. A. Slamm, C. R. Fleming, F. E. Ford and G. B. Sidell; Engineers, Henry Snyder, W. H. Harris, F. G. Coggin and G. J. Lamberson. Steam gun-boat Tahoma Lieutenant-Commander, A. A. Semmes; Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Gunning; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. Hennesy; Acting-Ensigns,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
tants, E. J. Gillespie, Charles Goodwin and E. M. Clark. Steamer Penguin. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, James R. Beers; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, C. D. White; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, T. C. Hutchinson; Acting-Master, Tolford Durham; Acting-Ensigns, Charles Knowles, N. S. Hayden and Benj. Caullet; Acting-Master's Mates, Charles Smith, Jr., F. C. Almy and W. A. Hannah; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, F. W. Warner; Acting-Second-Assistant, Milton Randall; Acting-Third--Assistants, John Webster, Edw. Reilly and DeWitt C. McBride. Steamer Tennessee. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Pierre Giraud; Assistant-Surgeon, W. C. Hull; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, B. F. D. Fitch; Acting-Master, Geo. E. Nelson; Acting Ensigns, J. B. Trott, W. S. Bacon and Jos. Marthon; Acting-Master's Mate, H. E. Giraud; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, D. Frazer; Acting-Second-Assistant, E. C. Maloy; Acting-Third-Assistants, Thos. Fitzgerald, G. W. Kiersted and Thomas Campbell. Bark W. G. Anderson.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
y be dictated by the impulses of patriotism. Being a native of Maryland, Semmes had not even the excuse of siding with his State, for if he had he would have fought against the South. This difficulty he easily skips over by claiming to be a citizen of Alabama, yet he stigmatizes, as traitors to their States officers of Southern birth who remained loyal to the Union. Semmes has published what he doubtless considered a masterly argument in defence of his cause; but, although he speaks of Webster and Story with great contempt, he was hardly equal to either of them as a constitutional lawyer, and the secession fallacy has been so thoroughly exposed that we have no fears of another civil war based on State Rights theories. Commander Semmes resigned his commission in the United States Navy on the 15th of February, 1861, and made the best of his way to the capitol of the Southern Confederacy, temporarily fixed at Montgomery, Alabama. On his arrival he put himself in communication wi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
g-Third-Assistants, J. S. Essler, J. E. Scribner, Charles Hoskins and Daniel Ward. Penguin--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, James R. Beers; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, H. R. Ruckley; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, T. C. Hutchinson; Acting-Master, Tolford M. Durham; Acting-Ensign, Benj. Cantlett; Acting-Master's Mates, C. G. Smith, F. C. Army and W. A. Hannah; Acting-Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, F. W. Warner; Acting-Second-Assistant, M. P. Randall; Acting-Third-Assistants, John Webster, Richard Reilly and Dewitt C. McBride. Cornelia--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, John A. Johnstone; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. G. Dearborne; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. Eastlake; Acting-Master, Geo. Ferris; Acting-Ensigns, G. A. Harriman, Frank Millett and G. F. Brailey; Acting-Master's Mates, W. H. Wood and G. H. Russell; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, S. R. Brumage; Acting-Second-Assistant, T. J. Lavery; Acting-Third-Assistants; J. A. Boynton and George Altham.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
-seven officers were killed in action, 666 men and forty-eight officers died from wounds, and 3,246 men and sixty-three officers from disease. There were reported missing 389 men and twenty-one officers. Population in 1890, 746,258; in 1900, 908,355. Governors of the Connecticut colony Name.Date. John Haynes1639 to 1640 Edward Hopkins1640 to 1641 John Haynes1641 to 1642 George Wyllys1642 to 1643 John Haynes alternately from Edward Hopkins1643 to 1655 Thomas Welles1655 to 1656 John Webster1656 to 1657 John Winthrop1657 to 1658 Thomas Welles1658 to 1659 John Winthrop1659 to 1665 Until this time no person could be elected to a second term immediately following the first. Governors of the New Haven colony Name.Date. Theophilus Eaton1639 to 1657 Francis Newman1658 to 1660 William Leete1661 to 1665 Governors of Connecticut Name.Date John Winthrop1665 to 1676 William Leete1676 to 1683 Robert Treat1683 to 1687 Edmund Andros1687 to 1689 Robert Treat1689 to 169
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
en A. Chase, John B. Fisk, Francis W. Pickman, Franklin T. Sanborn, Dana Z. Smith, Daniel Stoddard, aldermen. In 1863, Stephen G. Wheatland, mayor; George R. Chapman, John B. Fisk, Daniel H. Mansfield, Francis W. Pickman, Franklin T. Sanborn, John Webster, aldermen. In 1864, Stephen G. Wheatland, mayor; John Barlow, George R. Chapman, Daniel H. Mansfield, Nathaniel G. Symonds, John Webster, Peter Silver, aldermen. In 1865, Joseph B. T. Osgood, mayor; John Barlow, George R. Chapman, Henry M. BJohn Webster, Peter Silver, aldermen. In 1865, Joseph B. T. Osgood, mayor; John Barlow, George R. Chapman, Henry M. Brooks, Abner C. Goodell, Jr., Daniel H. Mansfield, Simon Stodder, aldermen. The city-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Joseph Cloutman, Jr.; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Stephen P. Webb. The citytreas-urer during all of these years was Charles E. Symonds. 1861. The first vote passed by the city council, having relation to the war, was on the 19th of April, when it was— Ordered, That the sum of fifteen thousand dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated for the benefit of the families of those of ou
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
, Henry, 89. Verplanck, Gulian C., 81. Vining, Miss, 80. Vision of Sir Launfal, Lowell's, 164. Voices of the night, Longfellow's, 142. Walden, Thoreau's, 191. Wallace, Horace Binney, 72. Wallace, Lew, 129. Walpole, Horace, 45, 49. Ward, Artemus, 243. Warner, Charles Dudley, 88, 124. Warville, Brissot de, 52. Washington, 51, 63, 94, 117, 221. Wasson, David A., 264. Waverley novels, Scott's, 93, 274. Webster, Daniel, 43, 110, 111, 112-114. Webster, Hannah, 92. Webster, John, 258. Webster, Noah, 82. Week on the Concord and Merrimack rivers, Thoreau's, 191, 195. Welby, Mrs. Amelia B., 210. Wellington, Duke of, 123. Wendell, Barrett, 18, 109, 161. Wheeler, Charles Stearns, 261. When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloomed, Whitman's, 232. Whipple, Edwin Percy, 124, 125. White, Blanco, 263. White, Maria, 161. Whitman, Walt, 220, 221, 223, 227-234, 264. Whittier, Elizabeth, 240. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 128, 136, 137, 145-153, 197, 264. Whitti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
d, Private William P. Leak, Charles M. Liles, Edward A. McKaskell, James A. McKaskell, John J. McLendon, Benjamin F. Medley, Alexander S. Morrison, Thomas W. Morrison, George A. Morton, William H. Saunders, James L. Smith, Caswell Stallings, William H. Wadkins, Seth A. Williams. Co. D. 2d Sergeant Andrew J. Gamble, 4th Sergeant William H. Elwood Private John F. Dixon, Joseph T. Gaddy, John J. Harmon, Private Drewry D. Howell, John K. Mills, Francis Moore, John Webster. Co. E. 3d Sergeant James F. Lasiter, 5th Sergeant Rufus Smith, Private John M. Beck, Wm. A. Sturdivant, Private William T. Wood, James J. Lewis, John A. J. Penny, Mus'n Albert T. Carter. Co. F. 3d Sergeant John H. Walker, Private James T. Bird, Columbus Cooper, Private Ezekiel Campbell, Lemuel Jones, John R. Pertillo. Co. G. 1st Sergeant James W. Bawley, 1st Corporal John W. Lee, 2d Corporal Samuel F. Jones, Private Andrew J. Bragg, Abraham Cr