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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
ct; by ecclesiastical court, suspended......Dec. 10, 1844–Jan. 3, 1845 Ex-Senator J. C. Davis, of Illinois; T. C. Sharp, editor of Warsaw signal; Mark Aldrich, William N. Grover, and Col. Levi Williams, for murder of Hiram and Joe Smith (Mormons) ; trial begins at Carthage, Ill.; acquitted......May 21, 1845 Albert J. Tirrell (the somnambulist murderer), for killing Maria A. Bickford......1846 [Acquitted on the plea that the murder was committed while he was sleep-walking.] Dr. John W. Webster, for the murder of Dr. George W. Parkman in the Medical College, Boston, Nov. 23, 1849. Webster partly burns his victim. The remains identified by a set of false teeth. Webster convicted and hanged; trial......March 19-30, 1850 Catherine N. Forrest v. Edwin Forrest; divorce and alimony granted to Mrs. Forrest......Dec. 16, 1851–Jan. 26, 1852 Anthony Burns, fugitive-slave case, Boston......May 27-31, 1854 Dr. Stephen T. Beale, ether case......1855 United States v. Henr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webster, John White 1793- (search)
Webster, John White 1793- Chemist; born in Boston, Mass., May 20, 1793; graduated at Harvard College in 1811, and at its medical department in 1815; accepted the chair of Chemistry and Mineralogy there in 1827, and held it until his death. In 1842 he was loaned a sum of money by Dr. George Parkman, who later increased it to nearly $2,000. Subsequently Parkman accused Professor Webster of dishonesty. A meeting to settle matters was appointed for Nov. 23, 1849, at the college laboratory, and on that day Parkman was murdered. In his confession Professor Webster said he called me a scoundrel and a liar, and went on heaping on me the most bitter taunts anProfessor Webster said he called me a scoundrel and a liar, and went on heaping on me the most bitter taunts and opprobrious epithets. The facts brought out in the trial showed that Parkman had been killed by a blow on the head with a billet of wood. The body was then dismembered, parts of it burned with the clothing, and other parts concealed until they could be destroyed. At the trial 116 witnesses were examined and every effort made t