hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 100 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 364 results in 61 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886 (search)
Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886 Statesman; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 18, 1807; Charles Francis Adams. son of John Quincy Adams; was graduated at Harvard College in 1825. He accompanied his father to St. Petersburg and England, where he passed much of his childhood until the return of his family to America in 1817. Mr. Adams studied law in the office of Daniel Webster, and was admitted to the bar in 1828, but never practised it as a vocation. In 1829 he married a daughter of Peter C. Brooks, of Boston. For five years he was a member of the legislature of Massachusetts. Having left the Whig Party, he was a candidate of the free-soil party (q. v.) in 1848 for the Vice-Presidency of the United States. Mr. Van Buren being the candidate for the Presidency. They were defeated. In 1850-56 Mr. Adams published the Life and works of John Adams (his grandfather), in 10 volumes. In 1859 he was elected to Congress from the district which his father long represented. He was then a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William, 1710-1780 (search)
g a plan for restoring American dependence upon Great Britain. He died in England in September, 1780. educator and author; born in Pittsville, Mass., Jan. 2, 1784: graduated at Harvard College in 1802. After entering the ministry and preaching for some time in western New York, he was elected a regent and assistant librarian of Harvard College. He was president of Dartmouth College in 1817-20, and of Bowdoin College in 1820-39. He was the author of Junius unmasked; a supplement to Webster's dictionary; Psalms and hymns; Memoirs of Dr. Eleazer Wheelock and of Dr. John Codmand: a discourse at the close of the second century of the settlement at Northampton, Mass.; Wunaissoo, or the vale of Housatonnuck, a poem; Christian sonnets: poems of Nazareth and the cross: sacred songs; and numerous pamphlets, and contributed biographical articles to Sprague's Annals of the American pulpit. He also prepared the first edition of the American biographical and Historical dictionary. He di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ashburton, Alexander Baring, Lord, (search)
74; son of Sir Francis Baring, an eminent merchant: was employed, in his youth, in mercantile affairs, in the United States, and married an American wife. In 1810 he became the head of his father's business house; in 1812-35 sat in Parliament, and in 1835 was raised to the peerage under the title of Baron Ashburton. The unsettled condition of the Northeastern boundary question led Sir Robert Peel to send Baron Ashburton to the United States, as being widely acquainted with American affairs. Here he concluded, Aug. 9, 1842, with Daniel Webster, the Webster-Ashburton treaty, which settled the northeastern boundary between the United States and the British dominions. For this achievement he was accorded, in both Houses of Parliament, a complimentary vote of thanks, and an earldom was offered him, which he declined. He was privy councillor, a trustee of the British Museum, and received the D. C.L. degree from Oxford. He died in Longleat, England, May 13, 1848. See Webster, Daniel.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buena Vista, battle of. (search)
batteries, seeing this sign of weakness, said, quietly, Give 'em a little more grape, Captain Bragg (see Bragg, Braxton). It was done, and just at twilight the Mexicans gave way and fled in considerable confusion. Night closed the battle. Expecting it would be resumed in the morning, the Americans again slept on their arms, but when the day dawned no enemy was to be seen. Santa Ana had fallen back, and in a few days his utterly dispirited army was almost dissolved. In their flight the Mexicans had left about 500 of their comrades, dead or dying, on the field. With these and wounded and prisoners, their loss amounted to almost 2,000 men; that of the Americans, in killed, wounded, and missing, was 746. Among the slain was a son of Henry Clay. On the day of the battle Captain Webster, with a small party of Americans, drove General Minon and 800 Mexicans from Saltillo. Taylor returned to Walnut Springs, where he remained several months, and in the autumn of 1847 he returned home.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Choate, Rufus 1799-1859 (search)
Choate, Rufus 1799-1859 Lawyer; born in Essex, Mass., Oct. 1, 1799; studied at the Cambridge Law School, and, with William Wirt, became one of the most eminent lawyers and orators of his time. He began the practice of law at Danvers, Mass., in 1824. He was a distinguished member of both branches of his State legislature, a member of the Lower House of Congress, and United States Senator, succeeding Daniel Webster in 1841. In 1853 he was attorney-general of Massachusetts. After the death of Webster, Mr. Choate was the acknowledged leader of the Massachusetts bar. Impaired health compelled him to retire from public life in 1858. He died in Halifax, N. S., July 13, 1859.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Constitution of the United States (search)
of the respective legislatures to ratify their determinations. In the spring of 1783 Hamilton, in Congress, expressed an earnest desire for such a convention. Pelatiah Webster and Thomas Paine wrote in favor of it the same year, and in 1784 Noah Webster wrote a pamphlet on the subject which he carried in person to General Washington. In that pamphlet Webster proposed a new system of government which should act, not on the States, but directly on individuals, and vest in Congress full power Webster proposed a new system of government which should act, not on the States, but directly on individuals, and vest in Congress full power to carry its laws into effect. The plan deeply impressed the mind of Washington. Events in North Carolina and Massachusetts made many leading men anxious about the future. They saw the weakness of the existing form of government. In the autumn of 1785 Washington, in a letter to James Warren, deplored that weakness, and the illiberality, jealousy, and local policy of the States, that was likely to sink the new nation in the eyes of Europe into contempt. Finally, after many grave discussio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Curtis, George William 1824- (search)
which placed almost every position in the civil service unconditionally at his pleasure. This decision was determined by the weight of Madison's authority. But Webster, nearly fifty years afterwards, opposing his authority to that of Madison, while admitting the decision to have been final, declared it to have been wrong. The yincy Adams stood. But the debate continued during the whole Jackson administration. In the Senate and on the stump, in elaborate reports and popular speeches, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay, the great political chiefs of their time, sought to alarm the country with the dangers of patronage. Sargent S. Prentiss, in the House of Repnder Democratic administration, it had strenuously denounced as fatal. The pressure for place was even greater than it had been ten years before, and although Mr. Webster, as Secretary of State, maintained his consistency by putting his name to an executive order asserting sound principles, the order was swept away like a lamb by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861 (search)
ular, and the sub-treasury, they agreed on the great slavery question which now agitates the Union. I say that the Whig party and the Democratic party Stephen Arnold Douglas. agreed on the slavery question, while they differed on those matters of expediency to which I have referred. The Whig party and the Democratic party jointly adopted the compromise measures of 1850 as the basis of a proper and just solution of the slavery question in all its forms. Clay was the great leader, with Webster on his right and Cass on his left, and sustained by the patriots in the Whig and Democratic ranks who had devised and enacted the compromise measures of 1850. In 1851 the Whig party and the Democratic party united in Illinois in adopting resolutions endorsing and approving the principles of the compromise measures of 1850 as the proper adjustment of that question. In 1852, when the Whig party assembled in convention at Baltimore for the purpose of nominating a candidate for the Preside
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gardner, Dorsey 1842- (search)
Gardner, Dorsey 1842- Lexicographer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 1, 1842; was educated at Yale University. His publications include A condensed etymological dictionary of the English language; a rearrangement of Dr. Noah Webster's American dictionary of the English language, on an etymological basis, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grady, Henry Woodfen 1851-1892 (search)
hered above the couch of your dying captain, filling his heart with grace, touching his lips with praise and glorifying his path to the grave—will she make this vision on which the last sigh of his expiring soul breathed a benediction, a cheat and a delusion? If she does, the South, never abject in asking for comradeship, must accept with dignity its refusal; but if she does not—if she accepts with frankness and sincerity this message of goodwill and friendship, then will the prophecy of Webster, delivered in this very society forty years ago, amid tremendous applause, be verified in its fullest and final sense, when he said: Standing hand to hand, and clasping hands, we should remain united as we have been for sixty years, citizens of the same country, members of the same government, united, all united now and united forever. There have been difficulties, contentions, and controversies, but I tell you that, in my judgment, Those opposed eyes, Which like the meteors of a trou
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...