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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 100 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Noah Webster or search for Noah Webster in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
for the charge without stopping to fire. General Gordon is enthusiastic over the charge of Grover's brigade, but I think if he could have seen the Twelfth as they rose with a rush and a shout, and with cold steel and nothing more, closed in with the New Englanders, he would have found room for his brush on our side, too, of the picture he has so well drawn. The struggle, indeed, was a memorable one. It was the consummation of the grand debate between Massachusetts and South Carolina. Webster and Calhoun had exhausted the argument in the Senate, and now the soldiers of the two States were fighting it out eye to eye, hand to hand, man to man. If the debates in the Senate chamber were able and eloquent, the struggle on that knoll at Manassas was brave and glorious. Each State showed there that it had the courage of its convictions. General Gordon does not exaggerate or paint too highly the scene of that conflict. But it was too fearful, if not too grand, to last. Slowly at fir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Republic of Republics. (search)
ut the time of the celebrated contest between Webster and Hayne, the civil war, which subsequently tted all that the South ever claimed. When Mr. Webster, in the closing years of his life, witnesseion to all these, what are the voices even of Webster and Story and Curtis? In themselves not impoer, his construction meant fabrication; while Webster, as the advocate, aimed at the triumph and pe these he places the ideas of the perverters, Webster, Dane, Story, Curtis, and of the Acre of Wiseons. Moreover, the doctrines of Dane, Story, Webster and Jackson, were the platform, nay, the veryows to be correct, and for the use of which Mr. Webster charged Mr. Calhoun with abandoning constit school of perverters from Dane to Curtis. Noah Webster always asserted, according to the unquestioe this book from page 365 to 375. Shade of Noah Webster, with thy philological record, and with thyey deserved, doubtless he would have required Webster and Story to read alternately to each other t[7 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's method of making war. (search)
hilanthropic institutions. Speaking of fellows hanging about the army, he says: The Sanitary and Christian Commissions are enough to eradicate all trace of Christianity from our minds. July 14th, to General J. E. Smith, at Alatoona: If you entertain a bare suspicion against any family, send it to the North. Any loafer or suspicious person seen at any time should be imprisoned and sent off. If guerillas trouble the road or wires they should be shot without mercy. September 8. To General Webster, after the capture of Atlanta: Don't let any citizens come to Atlanta; not one. I won't allow trade or manufactures of any kind, but will remove all the present population, and make Atlanta a pure military town. To General Halleck he writes, I am not willing to have Atlanta encumbered by the families of our enemies. Of this wholesale depopulation, General Hood complained, by flag of truce, as cruel and contrary to the usages of civilized nations, and customs of war, receiving this co