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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Richard Hanson Weightman or search for Richard Hanson Weightman in all documents.

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ed upon the battle-field, none deserve a dearer place in the memory of Missourians than Richard Hanson Weightman, Colonel commanding the First brigade of the second division of the army. Taking up ar, and has since died. Gen. Rains' division was composed of two brigades — the first under Col. Weightman, embracing infantry, and artillery, 1,306 strong, lost not only their commander, but thirty- Our killed amount to two hundred and sixty-five, eight hundred wounded, and thirty missing. Col. Weightman fell at the head of his brigade of Missourians, while gallantly charging upon the enemy. Hi The Missouri troops at the north, the Louisiana troops at the southeast and south, and General Weightman's brigade of Missouri forces at the southwest, including his fine battery of artillery, haounded also, but not disabled. He continued to lead his wing on to victory most gallantly. Gen. Weightman now filed his column in on the right of my regiment, in Gen. Slack's division, where he fell
losses within my own army. Among those who fell mortally wounded upon the battle-field, none deserve a dearer place in the memory of Missourians than Richard Hanson Weightman, Colonel commanding the First brigade of the second division of the army. Taking up arms at the very beginning of this unhappy contest, he had already dKelly was wounded in the hand. Capt. Coleman was mortally wounded, and has since died. Gen. Rains' division was composed of two brigades — the first under Col. Weightman, embracing infantry, and artillery, 1,306 strong, lost not only their commander, but thirty-four others killed and 111 wounded. The Second brigade, mounted mere, and we mourn the death of many a gallant officer and soldier. Our killed amount to two hundred and sixty-five, eight hundred wounded, and thirty missing. Col. Weightman fell at the head of his brigade of Missourians, while gallantly charging upon the enemy. His place will not be easily filled. Generals Slack and Clark of Mi
issouri and Arkansas forces, and seven times regained his position. He had a strong force of regulars posted with Totten's battery around his person. The Missouri troops at the north, the Louisiana troops at the southeast and south, and General Weightman's brigade of Missouri forces at the southwest, including his fine battery of artillery, having been victorious at each point, rallied to the heights on the west, to support Gen. Slack's division, which had borne the brunt of the fight up towere both actively and gallantly urging forward this column, when Gen. Slack was severely wounded and taken from the field. Gen. Price was slightly wounded also, but not disabled. He continued to lead his wing on to victory most gallantly. Gen. Weightman now filed his column in on the right of my regiment, in Gen. Slack's division, where he fell mortally wounded, near Totten's battery, covered all over with wounds. I received his sword to keep it from the enemy. Meanwhile, the enemy's batte