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Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863.. You can also browse the collection for William Weir or search for William Weir in all documents.

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me twenty enlisted men. Colonel Jewell fell mortally wounded while leading a sabre charge through a narrow pass in the mountains near the head of Cove Creek just as darkness was coming on. Captain J. K. Hudson, Assistant Adjutant General of Colonel Weir's brigade, who had been on several bold adventures with Colonel Jewell during the day, was only a few yards from him when he fell. The gorges in the mountains through which we were pressing the enemy made our pursuit of him exceedingly difficu or fence, behind which were posted a large body of rebel infantry. It was the grandest sight I ever saw-our bright sabres gleaming in the sunlight of that lovely afternoon. This short action took place on the open prairie, and as I was near Colonel Weir and our batteries, a few hundred yards to the left of Col. Jewell's position, I could see every movement as distinctly as if I were watching two of our cavalry regiments going into a sham battle. In the presence of the enemy he never sought a
at the cost of so many lives and of so much toil and suffering? Is it because the present Commanding General did not direct the movements of our army in gaining the splendid victories that we have won? The jealousies of military rivals have already in other instances been a curse to our arms. The reorganization of the Army of the Frontier, which I have already mentioned as probable, is to take place immediately. General F. J. Herron is to command the second and third divisions, Colonel William Weir, Tenth Kansas infantry, the first division, and Colonel William A. Phillips, Third Indian regiment, the Indian division, consisting of all the Indian troops, one battalion of the Sixth Kansas cavalry, and Captain Hopkin's battery formerly attached to Colonel Cloud's brigade. With this force I-understand that Colonel Phillips will take up a position near Maysville, Benton county, Arkansas, a little town right on the line of the Cherokee Nation. I have been assigned to duty as Commiss
mand, the 2d of last July, and captured him with one hundred and ten of his soldiers, nearly all of whom were white men. We also captured his baggage and supply trains, in all upwards of one hundred wagons and about three hundred animals. Colonel William Weir, Tenth Kansas infantry, who commanded the expedition, marched us two days and nights, and we struck the enemy just at dawn-some of the brightest stars were still shining-and we had him surrounded before he knew of our presence. We reachedle we were encamped on Cowskin prairie we received information through our scouts that Colonel Standwaitie, with a force of four or five hundred Indians, was in this vicinity. Colonel Jewell, with about three hundred cavalry, was directed by Colonel Weir to make a reconnaissance to this point. We made a night's march, and late in the afternoon of the following day we heard that Standwaitie, with a small party of men, had just passed along the road we were on, only about an hour before. We pu