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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for D. A. Weisiger or search for D. A. Weisiger in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
se Captain Tom Bernard, courier for General William Mahone, came sweeping up the lines on his white charger to the headquarters of our brigade commander, Colonel D. A. Weisiger. Then the drums commenced rolling off the signals, which were followed by the command fall in and hurried roll calls. A large part of General Lee's moved off at quickstep for the seat of war. Wright's Georgia Brigade, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel M. R. Hall, and our Virginia brigade commanded by Colonel D. A. Weisiger, the latter numbering scarcely 800 muskets, constituted the first force detailed to dislodge the enemy, who held the broken lines with more than fifteen twelve killed and twenty-six wounded; the 16th lost twenty-one killed and eighteen wounded, and the 41st regiment lost thirteen killed and thirty-one wounded. Colonel Weisiger, commanding our brigade, was wounded and the command devolved upon Colonel Rogers. The total loss of the brigade was 258. There were many special acts of g