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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 155 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 78 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 53 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 42 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Godfrey Weitzel or search for Godfrey Weitzel in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 4 document sections:

First attack on Vicksburg battle of Baton Rouge-loss of the Arkansas Breckinridge occupies Baton Rouge. General Butler was a politician whose strongest ambition was, oddly enough, to become a successful commander. Without previous experience as such he was sufficiently wise to lean on servants trained in military affairs. He thought highly of Gen. Thomas Williams, a graduate of West Point and a veteran of the Mexican war. He leaned also upon the knowledge and scientific skill of Godfrey Weitzel, promoting him to brigadier-general of volunteers. Once safely seated in his office, and with troops in easy call, General Butler's martial ardor began to ferment. He was fond of surrounding himself with an air of military activity. His first work was practical At Algiers, on the river opposite the city, was the terminus of the New Orleans & Opelousas railroad. Promptly confiscating its rolling stock, he employed the road to bring in provisions to the city. On May 5th he ordered
ready resolved upon placing the command under Weitzel. On May 26, 1862, Department No. 2 had beecultivation of its fertile, alluvial fields. Weitzel with a compact army was then operating about ille, where he bivouacked in line of battle. Weitzel was fox-like. With a view to preventing the of the enemy. Vincent, who on the arrival of Weitzel was in Donaldsonville, had fallen back to the here and there along the bayou, soon came to Weitzel's ears. Weitzel claimed to be in undisputeWeitzel claimed to be in undisputed possession of the entire country between Boutte Station and Brashear City. The news of the Cottobsequently advancing to Lynch's Point. There Weitzel bivouacked for the night. A report ran that reat was the terror inspired by her name that Weitzel's first order, at day-break, was to call for he expedition having accomplished its object, Weitzel ordered an immediate return to Brashear City.s exultation on the result of the expedition, Weitzel poetically telegraphed on January 14th, The C[3 more...]
of the Red river bee which was to sting him a year later. Weitzel, commanding the Fourth brigade, reached Brashear City on Freasonably sure to meet with some of these bold riders. Weitzel's orders were to open communication between Indian Villagy, having thus occupied Indian Village, attempted, through Weitzel, unsuccessfully to utilize the water route to Lake Chicot.drift. Drift, rising higher and choking deeper, prevented Weitzel's junction with Emory on the Plaquemine. Assuredly the Mimake easy his Red river route by the bayou, had hoped from Weitzel's zeal to hear of the prompt capture of Butte-à--la-Rose.r indirectly, connected with the expedition up Red river. Weitzel had previously been despatched to move up the Teche, and heans on a new expedition. He reached Brashear City, where Weitzel's brigade was stationed, and immediately ordered Weitzel tWeitzel to cross the bay, followed closely by Emory. Grover, from Bayou Boeuf, reached him about 1 p. m. On April 10th, Banks' genera
ff; the river closed for three days to transports; and mounted scouts rode with free rein to a point opposite Kenner's. A few hours more and New Orleans might have been Confederate for one delicious space. But in the first week of July, 1863, events were clubbing counter to Taylor's plans for the city. Vicksburg had fallen. On the night of July 10th news came that the blue-coats were in Port Hudson. At times, history chooses agents of unequal power for its triumphs. On July 13th, Generals Weitzel, Grover and Dwight, with 6,000 of the victors of Port Hudson, came down the river, disembarked at Donaldsonville and advanced down the Lafourche. Taylor had been waiting for them. Joining Green, he found him with an excellent plan of battle. Green, gallant soul, much disturbed with qualms about Fort Butler, was in line with a force of 1,400 dismounted men, including a battery. The enemy appeared and Green, remembering his dropped laurel, charged with irresistible fury, driving them