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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Theodore D. Weld or search for Theodore D. Weld in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. E. Sewall. (search)
To Mrs. S. E. Sewall. Wayland, June 17, 1879. During these weeks, so filled with memories of our friend Garrison, I have seemed to feel the presence of you and your dear, good husband, as you say you have felt line. I thought of you continually — on the day of the funeral, and while reading the beautiful tributes offered by Phillips and Weld and Whittier. If his spirit was there, how happy he must have been! The general laudation in the newspapers was truly wonderful. If any prophet had foretold it thirty years ago, who would have believed him? It seems to me there never was so great a moral revolution in so short a time. It was elevating and thrilling to read the funeral services, and it must have been much more so to have heard them. If Mr. Garrison was mistaken in his strong belief that individual, conscious existence continued elsewhere, he will never know of his mistake ; but I think he was not mistaken. I suppose you noticed that Whittier recognized his spirit as st
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Theodore D. Weld. (search)
To Theodore D. Weld. Wayland, July 10, 1880. I thank you cordially for the interesting Memorial of your excellent wife. Mrs. Angelina Grimke Weld. Such a benediction is rarely bestowed on any man as to have loved and been beloved by such a woman. How dim and cold all the pictures of the old saints seem, when brought into comparison with the clear light of her conscience, and the glowing warmth of her love for her fellow-creatures. The memory of the early anti-slavery days is very sacred to me. The Holy Spirit did actually descend upon men and women in tongues of flame. Political and theological prejudices and personal ambitions were forgotten in sympathy for the wrongs of the helpless, and in the enthusiasm to keep the fire of freedom from being extinguished on our national altar. All suppression of selfishness makes the moment great; and mortals were never more sublimely forgetful of self than were the abolitionists in those early days, before the moral force which em
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
rians, the, and R. W. Emerson, 34; convocation of, at New York, 189. V. Venus of Milo, the, 172, 218. Victor Hugo's tragedy of John Brown, 173. W. Wallcut, Robert F., 284. War anecdotes, 158, 161, 180, 204. Wasson, David A.. 80, 91. Wayland, Mass., Mrs. Child's home in XV. Webster, Daniel, willing to defend the slave-child Med, 20; statue of, 190; Ichabod, 259. Weiss's (Rev. John) biography of Theodore Parker. 179. Weld, Angelina Grimke, memorial of, 258. Weld, Theodore D., letter to, 258. Westminster Review, The, 202. White, Maria, 50. Whitney, Miss, Anne, letters to, 247, 256; her statue of Samuel Adams, 257. Whittier, John G., biographical sketch of Mrs. Child, v.-xxv., 97; lines to Mrs. Child, on Ellis Gray Loring, 102; annoyed by curiosity-seekers, 142; letters to, 157, 159, 210, 215, 228, 235, 236; on the death of S. J. May, 212; his tribute to Colonel Shaw, 240; lines to Mrs. Child after her death, 269. Wightman, James M., 149. Wild