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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
ent of State. Secretary of State: William H. Seward (New York). War Department. Secretary of War: Simon Cameron (Pa.) Secretary of War: Edwin M. Stanton (Pa.), appointed Jan. 15, 1862. Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles (Conn.) Treasury Department. Secretary of the Treasury: Salmon P. Chase (Ohio) Secretary of the Treasury: W. P. Fessenden (Maine), appointed July 1, 1864 Secretary of the Treasury: Hugh McCulloch (Ind.), appointed March 7, 1865. am S. Harney. (Note.-E. V. Sumner was promoted Brigadier-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary: Gustavus V. Fox. Yards and Docks: Rear-Admiral Joseph Smith. Ordnance and Hydrography Captain George A. Magruder (dismissed April 22, 1861) Captain Andrew A. Harwood (relieved July 22, 1862) Rear-Admiral <
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
he Pocahontas did not arrive till the afternoon of the 13th. The expedition was in charge of Captain Gustavus V. Fox (afterward Assistant Secretary of the Navy), who had visited the fort on the 21st of March. It had been understood between Secretary Welles and Captain Fox that the movement should be supported by the Powhatan (1 11-inch and 10 9-inch guns); but, unknown to Mr. Welles, and perhaps without full understanding of this plan, President Lincoln had consented to the dispatch of the shiMr. Welles, and perhaps without full understanding of this plan, President Lincoln had consented to the dispatch of the ship to the relief of Fort Pickens, for which destination it had sailed from New York, April 6th, under command of Lieutenant David D. Porter. This conflict of plans deprived Captain Fox of the ship which he calls the fighting portion of his fleet; and to this circumstance he attributed the failure of the expedition. editors. Secession Hall, Charleston, scene of the passage of the ordinance of secession. From a photograph. About 12:30 the flag-staff of Fort Sumter was shot down, but it
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
hould be consulted. The call by telegraph followed close upon the letter. I hurried to Washington, where I was introduced to the Secretary of the Navy, the Hon. Gideon Welles, and to Captain G. V. Fox, afterward Assistant Secretary. In the August following I was to construct 7 gun-boats, which, according to the contract, were were for vessels that should be capable of going up the Tennessee and the Cumberland. As rapidly as possible I prepared and presented for the inspection of Secretary Welles and his able assistant, Captain Fox, plans of vessels drawing five feet. They were not acceptable to Captain Fox, who said: We want vessels much lighter thanckasaw, Milwaukee, Winnebago, and Kickapoo), and when these were approved by Captain Fox and the officers of the navy to whom they were submitted at Washington, Mr. Welles expressed the wish that I should confer with Admiral Foote about them before proceeding to build them, inasmuch as the experience which he had had at Forts Henr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
ughly that the work could begin at once. Nevertheless, for four months after Mr. Welles entered upon his office no steps were taken, even of the most elementary charning of his administration, in a situation of peculiar difficulty. Although Mr. Welles had at one time been connected with the Navy Department, having been the civiief-expedition to Fort Sumter, where he acted in a semi-private capacity, and Mr. Welles decided to take him into the department. The duties for which he was wanted,g-ship when Farragut passed the forts, and fled with other vessels up the Gideon Welles, Secretary of the United States Navy during the war. From a photograph. Miso give its holder a knowledge of the demands of a modern navy than that which Mr. Welles had filled from 1846 to 1849. He entered upon his task with vigor and intellin reference to iron-clads contrast favorably with the halting suggestions of Mr. Welles on the same subject. In a letter of May 8th, 1861, to Mr. Conrad, the chairm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
ave given little more than the names. A superior naval force must command the whole of this division of the coast. On July 25th, Captain Du Pont wrote: They have our memoirs, and, Mr. Fox tells me, are at them. We are to see the Secretary, Mr. Welles, to-night, at our request, to talk over cur labors. . . . [July 26th.] Last night our conference had a meeting with the Secretary of the Navy and Mr. Fox, when the subject of the expeditions Brevet Major-General Thomas W. Sherman. From a phres of the earth-works that we were soon to engage, the one on Hilton Head known as Fort Walker and the other on Bay Point as Fort Beauregard. On Nov. 15th, 1861, General T. W. Sherman changed the name of Fort Walker to Fort Welles (after Secretary Welles), and of Fort Beauregard to Fort Seward (after the Secretary of State). After the surveying steamer had planted some buoys, to serve as general guides, the four gun-boats last named anchored in the channel some distance apart, as additio
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
of disasters in the south and west, it was particularly grateful. Then again, under the circumstances, so little was expected from the navy that this success was entirely unlooked for. So, from one extreme to the other, the most extravagant anticipations were formed of what the ship could do. For instance: the blockade could be raised, Washington leveled to the ground, New York laid under contribution, and so on. At the North, equally groundless alarm was felt. As an example of this, Secretary Welles relates what took place at a Cabinet meeting called by Mr. Lincoln on the receipt of the news. The news was of the first day's battle before the Monitor had arrived.-editors. The Merrimac, said Stanton, will change the whole character of the war; she will destroy, seriatim, every naval vessel; she will lay all the cities on the seaboard under contribution. I shall immediately recall Burnside; Port Royal must be abandoned. I will notify the governors and municipal authorities in th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
the Union, some of the most efficient of the United States naval officers resigning their commissions. Their loss was severely felt by the Navy Department at Washington; nor was it long before the presence of great professional skill among the officers of the naval administration of the Confederate States became manifest. Indeed, the utility of the armor-plating adopted by France and England proved to be better understood at Richmond than at Washington. While the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Welles, and his advisers were discussing the question of armor, news reached Washington that the partly burnt and scuttled steam-frigate Merrimac, at the Norfolk Navy Yard, had been raised and cut down to her berth-deck, and that a very substantial structure of timber, resembling a citadel with inclined sides, was being erected on that deck. The Navy Department at Washington early in August advertised for plans and offers for iron-clad steam-batteries to be built within a stipulated time. My
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.65 (search)
nitor. In 1877, at the request of ex-Secretary Gideon Welles, C. S. Bushnell, of New Haven, one oters of comment by Captain Ericsson and ex-Secretary Welles, have been sent to the editors for publuel C. Bushnell, son of the builder: Honorable Gideon Welles. Dear Sir: Some time since, duringmittee, A. H. Rice, of Massachusetts, As Mr. Welles points out in his letter (see below), this w detail which I couldn't give him, and so Secretary Welles proposed that I should come and get you t Captain Ericsson before it was sent to Ex-Secretary Welles: New York, March 2d, 1877. Ericsson F.ith much pleasure your father's statement to Mr. Welles concerning the construction of the original Yours very truly, J. Ericsson. Ex-Secretary Welles, under date of Hartford, 19th March, 18r and the comfort they gave me. Yours, Gideon Welles. Captain Ericsson's version of the vis at once invited to pass into the room of secretary Welles. Here, without farther parley, the secre
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First iron-clad Monitor. (search)
The First iron-clad Monitor. Hon. Gideon Welles. The Navy of the United States, at the commencement of Mr. Lincoln's administration, was feeble, and in no condition for belligerent operations. Most of the vessels in commission were on foreign service; only three or four, and they of an inferior class, were available for act the little Monitor had taken care of her. Oh! said the President, pointing to the boats which lined the shore, that is Stanton's navy; that is the squadron that Welles would have nothing to do with, and about which he and Stanton had the dispute. It was finally decided, I believe, that the War Department might have a fleet of its own to fight the Merrimac, and there it is. We were all a little scared at that time. Mr. Welles felt bad enough, but was not enough scared to listen to Stanton's scheme of blockading the river; said the fleet of boats would be useless, and, if used, worse than useless. Stanton, who was a little disconcerted by the Presiden
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The War's Carnival of fraud. (search)
retary Stanton for my detail to him for temporary service. Receiving my orders, I reported to Mr. Welles a few days later; and, on the 16th, was officially commissioned as Special Commissioner of the Navy Department. Mr. Welles had some suspicion that there were abuses in his navy yards needing correction, but no very definite information. A contractor, named Henry D. Stover, had been convictedithin ten days General Dix, under orders of the Secretary of War, acting at the instance of Secretary Welles, had arrested every member of this infamous ring of contractors and middlemen, and turned de use of the expression above referred to; but in a document communicated to the Senate by Secretary Welles, in compliance with a resolution, Mr. Fox thus emphatically put his foot upon the falsehoodmyself, was weary of these arrests; and, atter taking some months to turn it over in his mind, Mr. Welles at last approved a plan I presented him, at the instance of Mr. J. P. Veeder, my chief assista
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