hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Gideon Welles or search for Gideon Welles in all documents.

Your search returned 191 results in 34 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
n, was a mere bagatelle. Day by day the blockade of the Southern sea-coast became more stringent, and as Congress was made to feel the urgent appeals of Mr. Secretary Welles for an increase of the Navy, and became aware that the resources of the enemy diminished in proportion as those of the Navy increased, and realized that, wn that their heroic exertions should receive proper credit, and we cannot better do justice to the occasion than by repeating the eulogistic terms in which Mr. Secretary Welles speaks of them: In the appendix to this report (1863) will be found correct records of the extraordinary adventures attending the efforts to get controwith which force, co-operating with the Army, the Mississippi was opened to the sea, and all its tributaries brought under control of the Federal Government. Mr. Welles, in his official report, is almost as chary of praise for the services of the Navy before Vicksburg as was the military commanding officer in the West, who, onl
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
th of Lieutenant-Commander Flusser. capture of Plymouth by Confederates. communication of Secretary Welles on loss of Plymouth. General Peck to General Butler. casualties at Plymouth. attack on Ncticable and adequate to secure us against threatening disaster. I am, very respectfully, Gideon Welles. To Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. The Albemarle did not appear until nine monthso the resolution of Congress asking for information in regard to the capture of Plymouth, Mr. Secretary Welles sent a characteristic communication, in which he says: I transmit herewith copieslect or inattention on their part at Plymouth or elsewhere in that quarter. I have, etc., Gideon Welles. Mr. Secretary Welles, in his communication to Congress, plainly demonstrated that the CMr. Secretary Welles, in his communication to Congress, plainly demonstrated that the Confederates could never have captured Plymouth if adequate appropriations had been made when first asked for to construct light-draft iron-clads, but all through the war Congress required much urging
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
will all return to their stations in a few days, as there is no prospect, under present circumstances, of renewing operations in this part of Louisiana, the season having passed for operating with any chance of success. I am sorry to see that the rebel guerillas have become quite troublesome on the Mississippi since I left, all of which will be rectified within the coming week. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. The Ozark, a large iron-clad, was the last vessel to pass the dam, and it was feared at one time that she would have to be abandoned, for General Banks took up his line of march the moment he thought the vessels all through, apparently forgetting that they had still to get their guns and stores on board; but, as General A. J. Smith remained to bring up the rear, the Navy was not greatly troubled by General Banks' movements. For two or th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ult oftener than they praised, while half the time they were not properly informed in regard to matters on which they were expressing opinions. As soon as Secretary Welles heard of the results of the battle of Mobile Bay, he forwarded to Admiral Farragut the following congratulatory letter: Navy Department, Washington, Aur squadron, who participated in this great achievement, the Department tenders its thanks and those of the Government and country. Very respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral David G. Farrgaut, Commanding West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay. Fort Morgan remained yet to be captured, andtions which are hereby tendered to yourself, your officers and men, may be extended to the Army, who have so cordially cooperated with you. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay. As soon as Fort Morgan had surrendered, Farragut ordered th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
So the torch was applied to the beautiful bark Neapolitan, of Kingston, Massachusetts, and she with her valuable cargo was totally consumed. Commander Semmes' justification, to use his own expressions, was that Gallant naval officers wearing Mr. Welles' shoulder-straps, and commanding Mr. Welles' slips, were capturing little coasting schooners laden with fire-wood, plundering the houses and hen-roosts of noncombatants along the Southern coast, destroying salt-works and intercepting medicines commanding Mr. Welles' slips, were capturing little coasting schooners laden with fire-wood, plundering the houses and hen-roosts of noncombatants along the Southern coast, destroying salt-works and intercepting medicines going to Confederate hospitals. Is it strange that men who would tell such falsehoods as the above would burn the ships of non-combatants? The Neapolitan was no sooner on fire than the Sumter started in pursuit of the other vessel, which proved to be the bark Investigator, of Searsport, Maine. The cargo being clearly the property of neutrals, the vessel, after giving a ransom-bond, was allowed to proceed on her course. Commander Semmes had now to be somewhat careful of seizing neutral p
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
ut on board the little clipper with a celerity that would have astonished Mr. Gideon Welles, and the new Confederate cruiser was christened the Tuscaloosa. The bapt could but detect the difference between the true and the false coin. Mr. Secretary Welles attached more importance to the escape of Semmes and his companions in td, and even blamed Captain Winslow for his course in paroling the prisoners. Mr. Welles characterized all those connected with the Alabama as pirates, but they were to muster a sufficient force of cruisers to put an end to the piracy of which Mr. Welles complained. As to the implied censure on Captain Winslow for not pursuing be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, John A. Winslow, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. To this dispatch the Secretct on the occasion entitles them to especial mention. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Captain John A. Winslow, Commanding U. S. Steamer K
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
olation of neutrality by the British Government in permitting the Confederate cruisers to escape its vigilance, was Mr. Gideon Welles, the Secretary of the Navy. He had appealed to Congress time after time to appropriate money to enable the Navy Dethe depredations of the Confederate commerce-destroyers, but Congress dealt out money in such insufficient amounts that Mr. Welles could not at once equip the class of vessels desired, not only to put a stop to the destruction of Federal commerce, bur, in case the Federal Government was driven to resort to the last extremity to preserve its prestige and its honor. Mr. Welles. in his annual reports, was unceasing in his denunciations of the remissness of the British Government and the depredatunfortunately, there were obstacles in the way which for a time impeded the progress of his plans. In the first place, Mr. Welles attached too much importance to the blockade of the Southern ports and listened too much to the clamors of commanders o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
e expedition. letters and telegrams from Secretary Welles. reports of officers. In a communication dated September 5, 1864, Mr. Secretary Welles states that, since the Winter of 1862, he had trieire to their vessels. In September, 1864, Mr. Welles made another application for troops to co-opgut, and on the 5th of September, 1864, Mr. Secretary Welles, in a letter to that officer, says: your country. Very respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Lieutenant W. B. Cnot seem consistent with patriotism. Mr. Secretary Welles had shown the greatest patience and percretary of War, although, in justice to Mr. Secretary Welles, we must say, it had much less weight wservant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. Cservant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Mr. Secretary Welles, after reading the above dispatches, sent the following telegram in cipher[7 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Complimentary letter of Reavery respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report of fleet-very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of fleet-captain K. s arrival at Hampton Roads, the Admiral received the following letter from Secretary Welles, which, if not as ardent as some of his congratulations to other officers ious success. Accept my thanks for your good work. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atla Federal Point, near Wilmington, by a combined attack of the Army and Navy. Gideon Welles. To complete the narrative of the events described in this chapter, the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
want of co-operation between Butler and the Admiral. To illustrate how little delay there was on the part of the Navy, we give the following letter from Mr. Secretary Welles to the President : Navy Department, Oct. 28, 1864. Sir — You are aware that, owing to shoal water at the mouth of Cape Fear River, a purely naval ance of having the military authorities impressed with the necessity of speedy action has prompted this communication to you. I have the honor to be, etc., Gideon Welles. The President. According to the military historian, General Butler never received any detailed orders regarding the expedition until December 6th, at whihe military historian has spoken exists in this letter, we leave to others to determine. The Admiral wrote very decidedly, and it had the desired effect. Mr. Secretary Welles wrote to General Grant: The ships can approach nearer to the enemy's works than was anticipated; their fire can keep the enemy away from their guns.
1 2 3 4