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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Early operations in the Gulf. (search)
made a demonstration, and an encounter took place between that vessel and the Massachusetts. The Florida, having the advantage of higher speed and less draught, was able to choose her distance, and exploded a 68-pounder rifle shell in the Massachusetts, but without doing serious damage. The engagement was indecisive. In December a detachment of 2500 troops under Brigadier-General John W. Phelps was posted on the island, which had up to this time been held by the navy. According to Secretary Welles (in The Galaxy for Nov., 1871), the Navy Department first conceived the idea of an attack on New Orleans in September, 1861, and the plan took definite shape about the middle of November, Commander D. D. Porter undoubtedly had the scheme in mind as early as June, 1861, when he was off the Passes in the Powhatan.--J. R. S. from which time the department was busily engaged in preparation for the expedition. As a part of the plan, it was decided to divide the Gulf Squadron into two com
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
ned to them how easily it could be accomplished, they expressed surprise that no action had been taken in the matter, and took me in with them at once to see Secretary Welles. I then gave the Secretary, in as few words as possible, my opinion on the importance of capturing New Orleans, and my plan for doing so. Mr. Welles listeneMr. Welles listened to me attentively, and when I had finished what I had to say he remarked that the matter should be laid before the President at once; and we all went forthwith to the Executive Mansion, where we were received by Mr. Lincoln. My plan, which I then stated, was as follows: To fit out a fleet of vessels-of-war with which to atta a large army with which to guarantee the safety of the Federal seat of Government, and to march upon Richmond. Our party was now joined by Mr. Seward, Secretary Welles, in a paper printed in The Galaxy for November, 1871, says: The President, General McClellan, and the two gentlemen named [Assistant-Secretary Fox and Comman
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Farragut's capture of New Orleans. (search)
n the United service magazine for January, 1881, and ex-Secretary Welles, in The Galaxy for November, 1871, both fix the timetrain of arduous duty. These were the main reasons that Mr. Welles, the Secretary, and Mr. Fox, the Assistant Secretary, ha a mistake; he simply assented to the previous choice of Mr. Welles and Mr. Fox. (See articles by Welles and Blair, above rWelles and Blair, above referred to.) Ex-Secretary Welles relates that the armament of the fleet had been determined, before Farragut's appointmenEx-Secretary Welles relates that the armament of the fleet had been determined, before Farragut's appointment to the command, after consultation with the War Department and with General McClellan, who detailed General Butler to commareduce Forts Jackson and St. Philip to a heap of ruins. Mr. Welles says that Mr. Fox, who was a trained naval officer, at fine, and was a little inclined to distrust his ability. Mr. Welles relates that after this interview Farragut was brought to push forward the work on the iron-clad and the fleet. Mr. Welles, in The Galaxy, quotes a dispatch from Porter himself wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
he inhabitants of Washington. But to a European, not the least curious part of the pageant was the President, with his entire Cabinet, in citizens' dress, boldly caracoling at the head of a brilliant military cortege, and riding down the long lines of troops to the rattle of drums, the flourish of trumpets, and the loud huzzas of the whole army. While his aides-de-camp were engaged in the field, McClellan worked ceaselessly with the Secretaries of War and of the Navy, Simon Cameron and Gideon Welles, preparing great expeditions, half military and half naval, that should plant the national flag on the principal points of the enemy's coast, and secure convenient bases for future operations. The success won at Port Royal encouraged the Federal Government in these projec ts. McClellan himself had brought back from the Crimea a personal experience which enabled him, better than any one else, to preside over the details of preparation. Edwin M. Stanton. From a photograph. Mr. Sew
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The navy in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
Department whether the Merrimac, at that time lying in the Elizabeth River, could be held in check, and Assistant Secretary Fox replied that the Monitor would be sufficient for that purpose. Captain Fox said: It was determined that the army should go by way of Fort Monroe. The Navy Department never was consulted at all, to my knowledge, in regard to anything connected with the matter. No statement was ever made to us why they were going there beyond this. On the 14th of March, Secretary Welles wrote to Secretary Stanton regarding McClellan's call for naval assistance: If a movement is to be made upon Norfolk, always a favorite measure of this Department, instant measures will be taken to advise and strengthen Flag-Officer Goldsborough; but unless such be the case, I should be extremely reluctant to take any measure that would even temporarily weaken the efficiency of the blockade. On the 17th Gen. McDowell wrote to McClellan: In connection with General Barnard I h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Administration in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
id not understand. The campaign had failed. The President visited Harrison's Landing to see for himself what was to be done next. Then General McClellan handed him his well-known letter upon a civil and military policy covering the whole ground of our national trouble. He called Mr. Stanton's attention to this letter, in the reply we have just cited, and told him that for no other policy would our armies continue to fight. This must have been the last straw. Confirmed by Chase and Welles.--R. B. I. On one point, however, he was in accord with the President. He wound up by recommending the appointment of a commander-in-chief of the army who should possess the President's confidence. On the 11th General Halleck was appointed. On the 26th General Halleck arrived at General McClellan's camp. He reports that McClellan expressed the opinion that with 30,000 reenforcements he could attack Richmond, with a good chance of success. I replied that I was authorized by the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
cClellan and received from his hands the Harrison's Bar letter. On the 11th, General Halleck was appointed General-in-chief. Mr. Chase says in his diary (see Life and public services of S. P. Chase, by J. W. Schuckers, p. 447) that he and Mr. Stanton proposed to the President to send Pope to the James and give [Ormsby M.] Mitchel the command of the front of Washington. . . . The President was not prepared for anything so decisive, and sent for Halleck and made him Commander-in-chief. Secretary Welles says ( Lincoln and Seward, p. 191): Pope also . . . uniting with Stanton and General Scott in advising that McClellan should be superseded and Halleck placed in charge of military affairs at Washington.--Editors. though Mr. Stanton was opposed to it and used some pretty strong language to me concerning General Halleck and my action in the matter. They, however, established friendly relations soon after General Halleck assumed command. The reasons which induced me, in the first insta