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Stringham's reports. off Hatteras Inlet, U. S. Flag-ship Minnesota, August 30, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: I have the honor to inform you that we have been eminently succ Atlantic Blockading Squadron. off Hatteras Inlet, U. S. Ship Minnesota, August 30, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy : sir: I have the honor to enclose the articles of capitulation ficial report. United States flag-ship Minnesota, New York harbor, September 2, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of Navy: sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that I left Hampton Commander Stellwagen's report. U. S. Chartered steamer Adelaide, August 31, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: I have to report that the expedition to Cape Hatteras Inlehe enthusiasm of its brave officers and sailors. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Com. S. H. Stringham. Secession reports. Major Andrews' report. on board Unite
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal harbor, November 6, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: sir: The Government having determin. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. The Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: sir: I have the honor to inform g Squadron. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal, Nov. 8, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles: sir: I have the honor to report the following casualties in the actiog Squadron. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal, Nov. 9, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles: sir: Since writing my official despatches, I have sent gunboats to tau will cause to be read to your command. I am, sir, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Flag-officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadr each navy-yard, at meridian, on the day after the reception of this order. Gideon Welles. Report of Major Reynolds. U. S. Ship Sabine, at sea, November 8,
When this duty is completed, I have to request that Lieut. Crosby may be permitted to return to his important duties at this post, as post captain, under the orders of Gen. Wool. I send Capt. Crosby on board of the prize because he is the important witness of what occurred after we boarded the schooner. This vessel, like the three already captured, stood in under the belief that the forts were still in the hands of the enemy, (the Pawnee, showing no colors, was taken for an English cruiser,) and were not boarded until they were inside the bar. We are beginning to see signs of the enemy on the southwestern side of the entrance, where it is believed a picket guard frequents to watch our movements. I enclose a letter found among the papers of the so-called Susan Jane, which may give the Department some idea of the policy in Nova Scotia. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. C. Rowan, Commander U. S. Navy. Gideon Welles, Sec. Navy, Washington.
ing charge of fitting out the expedition to the minutest detail. It is to his thoughtfulness that a great portion of its success must be ascribed. W. M. To Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. The Secretary of the Navy issued the following acknowledgment of the gallantry of the Federal forces: Navy De memory of those brave men should not be lost in the hearts of all true patriots, but be ever cherished therein. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron. Promotion of Lieutenant Russell. Navy Department, October 4, 1861. Lieutenant John stroy the rebel privateer Judah. For your gallantry on this occasion the department designs to assign you to the command of one of the new gunboats, and you are therefore detached from the Colorado, and you will proceed to Washington, D. C., and report yourself in person to the department. I am, respectfully, Gideon Welles.
purchased, fitted out, or held, &c. This allusion to letters of marque does not authorize such letters to be issued, nor do I find any other act containing such authorization. But the same act, in the second edition, as above quoted, gives the President power to authorize the commanders of any suitable vessels to subdue, seize, &c. Under this clause, letters permissive, under proper restrictions and guards against abuse, might be granted to the propeller Pembroke, so as to meet the views expressed by Mr. Forbes. This would seem to be lawful, and perhaps not liable to the objections of granting letters of marque against our own citizens. and that too without law or authority from the only constituted power that can grant it. I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a letter from Messrs. J. M. Forbes & Co. and others, addressed to this Department, on the same subject. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State.
the House of Representatives, called the attention of the Navy Department to a statement in the newspapers that Capt. J. H. Morrison, of the steamer Fanny, captured by the Confederates off Cape Hatteras, was imprisoned at Fortress Monroe for refusing to take the oath of allegiance, and inquired if the statement was true in whole or in part. The Department replied as follows: Navy Department, October 9, 1861. sir: Your letter of the 8th instant, relative to the newspaper reports concerning the master of the steamer Fanny, has been received. The steamer alluded to was not at the time of her capture in the service of this Department, and has never been employed by it; and the same may be said of her captain. This Department has no knowledge of him whatever, and I have no reason to suppose that at the time of the capture of the Fanny a single person in any way connected with the navy was on board of her. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles. Hon. John F. Potter, Chairman &c.
and, with my answer. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Instructions to Lieut. Fairfax. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, Novembeity, I am willing to abide the result. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States steamer San Jacinto, November 15, 1861. sir: Before leaving your ship, weonstitute a precedent hereafter for infractions of neutral obligations. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Statement of the purser of the Trent. Royal mail steamship Trent, At sea, November 8, 1861. To the Editor ourray and Deputy-Marshal Sanford on board. They delivered to Capt. Wilkes despatches from the Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, and Secretary of State, William H. Seward. As soon as Capt. Wilkes read these despatches, he turned the ship's head
es, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washingto
them in double-irons. On boarding her, the crew were found in a drunken state, committing all the destruction they could — throwing overboard the arms and ammunition, spiking the gun, and cutting the sails and rigging to pieces. She was otherwise in bad order and poorly found, and having but a short supply of water, of which we had none to spare, was in no condition to send to Boston. Having twenty-seven prisoners, and no room for them on board the W. G. Anderson, I decided, as we were within three days sail of Key West, to take them and the vessel into that port and deliver them to the proper authorities, and thence return to my cruising-ground. I also am desirous of procuring, if possible, some ballast, of which the bark is very much in need. Trusting that my proceedings will meet with your approbation, I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, William C. Rogers, A. V. Lieut. Comm'g U. S. Bark W. G. Anderson. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.
he 7th. By the fall of Tybee Island, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, which is within easy mortar distance, becomes only a question of time. The rebels have themselves placed sufficient obstructions in the river at Fort Pulaski, and thus, by the cooperation of their own fears with our efforts, the harbor of Savannah is effectually closed. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your most obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Block'g Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. The following account of the occupation is given by an officer of the expedition: U. S. Ship Pocahontas, at the anchorage, Savannah harbor, Tybee Island, Nov. 24, 1861. The steamer Flag, Commander John Rodgers, was despatched by Flag-officer Dupont to reconnoitre this. point and ascertain the position and strength of the rebels. He did so, and on his return to Port Royal he had the Seneca and this vessel added to his command, and this morning, wit
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