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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
I were to support Farragut, was to be done in seven days. Fortunately it took him fifteen days and more to get over the bar at the Sou-West Pass at the mouth of the river, and eight days more were consumed in waiting for that superbly useless bombardment, which Farragut never believed in from the hour when it was first brought to his attention to the time when the last mortar was fired. When Farragut was called to Washington and the naval part of the expedition was confided to him by Secretary Welles, Porter having a month before that gone to New York to prepare his mortar flotilla, the Secretary says:-- He gave his unqualified approval of the original plan, adopted it with enthusiasm, and said it was the true way to get to New Orleans, and offered to run by the forts with even a less number of vessels than we were preparing for him, provided that number could not be supplied. While he would not advise the mortar flotilla, it might be of greater benefit than he anticipated, migh
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
that one of the rebel ironclads got aground in Trent's Reach, and the others went back to help it off. This took so long that the night passed, and in daylight when they got the vessel off, the forts opened upon them, and they ran back up river and never came down afterwards. A court-martial was held on Parker, presided over by Admiral Farragut, which found him guilty of cowardice, and he was sentenced to be dismissed from service. This sentence was changed to a lighter punishment by Gideon Welles, who thought cowardice excusable. Dutch Gap has since been dredged out, and is the main channel of commerce between Richmond and the outer world. The waters of James River being diverted by the canal no longer flow around at any depth through Trent's Reach, and that which was the former channel of the river will soon, if it has not already, become marsh land. Dutch Gap Canal is the only military construction of all that were done by the army which remains of use to the country in
tack should be made and therefore he kept up a series of letters and reports to Welles, the Secretary of the Navy, some of which were confidential, begging him to keeebel shell was about to be exposed. Again:-- Confidential letter to Secretary Welles, December 29, 1864. And now, sir, I beg that you will allow me to workd be, for General Butler had made an opinion for him. Confidential letter to Welles, Dec. 29, 1864. (See Appendix No. 138.) . . . If this temporary failure suc. These reports were only downright falsehoods, made for the purpose of getting Welles to allow him to make another attempt. Porter's performances at the first attt possible friends. During this time Porter wrote a confidential letter to Gideon Welles, the Secretary of the Navy. The close, friendship of Grant and Porter remand brought to the attention of Mr. Robeson the confidential letter of Porter to Welles, and that was so abusive of Grant and made such accusation against him that the
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
cording to military law and usage, the President will be advised in any such case that you be discharged and go of these accusations without day, and if he deem it expedient that he grant you executive clemency. I said: If that is done in due order, Mr. President, no man will say that Davis has not had a fair. trial, and you will have referred the question of his guilt to the highest court of the country and will be at liberty to act at your discretion under the best guides you have. At any rate you will have lifted the burden of this case from yourself to the courts. The President said that he thought well of this plan and would take it into consideration. Soon after this he began to waver in his determination that treason should be punished and traitors take back seats, and the commission was never called together. I understood that Mr. Secretary Welles alone of the Cabinet objected to my plan and said the trial must be by jury under the Constitution. Decorative Motif.
S. flag-Ship Malvern, Beaufort, N. C., Jan. 9, 1865. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: Sir:--. flag-Ship Malvern, off Fort Fisher, Jan. 15, 1865. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: Sir:--. flag-Ship Malvern, off Fort Fisher, Jan. 17, 1865. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: Sir:--s flag-Ship Malvern, Beaufort, N. C., Dec. 29, 1864. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: Sir:--. 140. see page 818.] Porter's report of Dec. 29 to Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. At no time did I permit tern, at sea, off New Inlet, North Carolina, Dec. 26. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: . . . At daylight, on theS. flag-Ship Malvern, off Wilmington, Dec. 24, 1864. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: Sir:--. flag-Ship Malvern, Cape Fear River, Jan. 24, 1865. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: My Dea
8; confers with Porter regarding attack on Fort Fisher, 791; reports condition of fort, 792,794; agrees that an attack would be useless, 796; report, 798; quoted, 808; references, 810, 814; commendation of, 814; report on Fort Fisher, 816, 817; reference to, 818-819, examined by investigating committee, 821; shielded by Butler, 821-822; friendly letter from Butler, 822; reference, 862; commendation of, 894. Weldon Railroad cut, 651. Wellington, Duke of, defines martial law, 842. Welles, Gideon, mitigates Parker's sentence, 752; powder-boat experiment approved by, 807; Porter's correspondence with, 808; Porter's report to, 811-812; reference to, 818; confidential letter from Porter, 823; objects to Butler's suggestion regarding Davis' trial, 918; reference to, 966; in the Farragut prize case, 1010-1012. West Point, Butler desires to enter, 57; sends son to, 80; grandson at, 81; appointed visitor to, 127; officious graduate of, 199-200, 205, 207; sanitary science not taught a