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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
attention to the woodcock story, of which I have already written you, and he told me that the epigram which I have sent you under his Lordship's name was written by the Bishop of Durham, and that it was the best of all offered. The Marquis of Wellesley wrote a Latin one, of which he has promised to give me a copy; it is not, however, lapidary, being too long. Brougham told me that his own Greek epigram was the worst of all. You will see an allusion to this story in a note in the last Quarteriams's Epigram on Napoleon, and told him that I thought it compared well with that on Themistocles in the Anthology. He said the latter was very fine; that he thought, however, there were others in the Anthology better, but that the Marquis of Wellesley was of a different opinion on this point, and that the Marquis was a much higher authority than himself on these matters. He then repeated to me Williams's lines on the Apollo, and took up his pen and wrote them down for me without referring t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
e; but that it was very good. He told how he secured good steaks, by personally going into the kitchen and watching over his cook, to see that he did not spoil them by pepper and horse-radish,—the last being enough to make a man go mad. I called his attention to the woodcock story, of which I have already written you, and he told me that the epigram which I have sent you under his Lordship's name was written by the Bishop of Durham, and that it was the best of all offered. The Marquis of Wellesley wrote a Latin one, of which he has promised to give me a copy; it is not, however, lapidary, being too long. Brougham told me that his own Greek epigram was the worst of all. You will see an allusion to this story in a note in the last Quarterly Review, to which I first called Chantrey's attention. I have spoken of Courtenay as the great gastronomer; I shall not neglect to add that he is as good a scholar as epicure. When we were speaking of Greek epigrams, he and Brougham alternately