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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 48 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 38 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Wellington or search for Wellington in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
n the death of his father, in 1852. the eldest son of the Duke of Wellington. Lady Morgan at once straightened herself in her seat, assumed a brimful house interrupting him with vociferous applause, and old Wellington nodding his head, and adding his cheer. You will read his speechng of the debate. I suggested to him a blunder which the Duke of Wellington had committed in his speech, when he alluded to the case of Spain. At breakfast at Mr. Senior's, a few mornings after the Duke of Wellington's attack on our country, I met a person who was quite brilliant ajournal by a comparison between the Great Captain and the Duke of Wellington. He wished it to be known that, if it contained no humor or satiColonel John Gurwood, 1791-1845; private secretary to the Duke of Wellington. (the editor of Wellington's Despatches), Sir Henry Ellis, 177Wellington's Despatches), Sir Henry Ellis, 1777-1869; Librarian of the British Museum. Lord Aberdeen, Lord Hatherton, and Lord Seaford. During a long evening a variety of subjects have b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
like a gentleman. I have already written you of Lady Morgan. Her Ladyship, you know, is a fierce Democrat. She was in the midst of professions of democracy during a morning call, when the knocker resounded—as these English knockers do—over the house; and her niece, who was sitting at the window of the drawing-room, announced the cab and tiger of the Marquis of Douro, He was born in 1807, and succeeded to the dukedom on the death of his father, in 1852. the eldest son of the Duke of Wellington. Lady Morgan at once straightened herself in her seat, assumed a queenly air, and, when the noble lord entered, received him with no little dignity. I was presented to his Lordship as a very distinguished American, who had been feted by all the nobility of England! So you will see her Ladyship was determined to make the most of her visitors. We bowed,—that is, Lord Douro and myself,—and conversation went on. He is about forty, and appears to be a pleasant, good-natured, and rather cle
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
ps as soon as this sheet, perhaps sooner. This will go in the packet of the 25th March; I go in the London packet (the Wellington) of April 1, leaving Portsmouth, April 4. I first took a berth in the Mediator of the 29th March; but Cogswell and Wilch 28, 1840. dear Hillard,—These are my last words to you from this side. I sail from Portsmouth, 4th April, in the Wellington,—perhaps shall reach you before this note. London is more bewitching than ever. Have already seen many people,—the Laby the Great Western, which sails the fifteenth of this month, She arrived at New York, May 3,—the same day with the Wellington. and perhaps may reach you even before I have that pleasure. I saw more of London than I expected, and enjoyed it much for Willis's appearance. Cogswell is by my side at this moment. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. The Wellington arrived at New York, Sunday, May 3. Sumner, on landing, met his brother Albert, then living in the city. That day or
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
illiterate, and mischievous production, by which sensible people have been disgusted, as much in America as in England. Do not be anxious about McLeod. He will not come to harm. I have reason to know that our Government are disposed to do all that you and the law of nations can expect. You have adopted the burning of the Caroline as your act. Of course, all individual liability is merged in the Queen's responsibility. We cannot justly condemn McLeod more than the French the Duke of Wellington, if any one should pursue him at Paris for a murder committed after the battle of Waterloo. But, I think, all English lawyers will see that there are difficulties in arranging the manner of taking advantage of the defence which McLeod has. He has been indicted; and, unless the Attorney-General of the State of New York, who is the prosecuting officer, is willing to take the responsibility of entering a nolle prosequi,— which I presume he will not do,—the defence must be set up at the trial
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
nstance the Peace Society of that city published, late in the following January, an abridgment prepared by him. Seven thousand copies of this edition were printed; of which this Society distributed two thousand, the London Peace Society two thousand, and other Peace Societies the remaining three thousand. The friends of Peace took special pains to send copies to daily and weekly journals, reviews, and other periodicals, and to eminent clergymen and public men,—among whom were the Duke of Wellington, Sir Robert Peel, the Earl of Aberdeen, Lord Palmerston, and Lord John Russell: one copy was sent to the venerable Thomas Clarkson, and another, through the Bishop of Norwich, to the Queen. Mr. William Smith, the Fleet Street publisher, issued in May an edition, in a small volume, of two thousand copies of the entire oration, writing at the time to its author,— I should rejoice to have succeeded in giving it a much more extensive circulation, believing it to be the best appeal to th