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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 48 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 38 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wellington or search for Wellington in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
ld alone is capable of stamping upon the forehead of man that mark which neither the injustice of adverse interest, nor envy's gnawing tooth, nor the ceaseless flow of the river of time are able to efface. Therefore, it was with swelling heart and deep thankfulness that I recently heard some of the first soldiers and military students of England declare that within the past two hundred years the English speaking race has produced but five soldiers of the first classborough, Washington, Wellington, Robert Lee, and Stonewall Jackson. I heard them declare that Jackson's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, in which you, and you, and you, and I myself in my subordinate place, followed this Immortal, was the finest specimen of strategy and tactics of which the world has any record; that in this series of marches and battles there was never a blunder committed by Jackson; that this campaign in the Valley was superior to either of those made by Napoleon in Italy. One British officer, who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
bers. Apperson, James L. Archer, Robert S. Ainslie, George A. Allen, Charles W. Burrows, Rev. J. L. Burress, James E. Beville, Wm. J. Bates, Charles Barney, Dr. C. G. Bailey, Samuel M. Cabell, Dr. J. G. Dooley, John Dudley, Thomas U. Doswell, Thomas W. Dibrell, R. H. Enders, John Exall, Henry Ellett, Andrew L. Eacho, Edward D. Edmond, Robert Ellyson, Moses Frayser, Lewis H. Glazebrook, L. W. Gatewood, Robert Goddin, Wellington Hobson, Julius A. Hackett, James H. Harrison, Samuel J. Harvey, John B. Isaacs, Wm. B. Jinkins, Andrew James, Edwin T. Johnston, Andrew Lyons, William H. Leftwich, John H. McCance, Thomas W. McKeil, John W. Martin, Jordan H. Meredith, R. L. Mitchell, John (Irish patriot). Maury, Robert H. Montague, John H. Purcell, John Perkins, E. T. Paine, Robert A. Palmer, George S. Peachy, Dr. St. G. Quarles, Benj. M. Randolph, Jos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
rigades with their commanders perished; soon the grand old Imperial Guard, that had never known defeat, hurled its front ranks into a yawning chasm of earth that its rear might pass over to meet, upon the fixed bayonets of the hollow squares of Wellington, a no less certain fate. And all this, why? A cowboy said to a general on one bright Sunday morning: Sire, take this road. Blucher, seventy-three years old, fired with the spirit of war and revenge, falling from his horse, but mounting again with the alacrity of youth, presses upon the scene, while Wellington prays that he or night would come. Waterloo was won by the accident of a well-directed route. Malvern Hill was doubtless a drawn battle because the Quaker road was misunderstood. It was a fearful ordeal to pass from under the cover of the hills that fringed the Crew field, and face the enemy. I could easily give you examples of personal valor and heroism unsurpassed in war. Of many such, probably none exceeded the galla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. (search)
rendered them among the toughest soldiers who ever did battle in any cause. The men proved obedient to discipline and orders. Company and regimental government was more due to the personal influence and example of the officers and non-commissioned officers, to the reciprocal esteem of private soldiers and their immediate superiors in rank for each other than to The Article of War and to the army regulations. The greater the fool the better the soldier has been ascribed to the Duke of Wellington. It is a perverse saying contradicted by the experience of our war. I heard a venerable man caution a youth, who was given to indiscretions, against the first wrong steps in life. The after weight of such false start. Never were soldiers more helped by fortune in their first hostile meeting with the enemy, than was the 1st regiment of North Carolina in its baptism of blood at Bethel. You have commemorated in deep letters cut away down into the stone body of the monument, which st