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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anne, Queen, (search)
up arms against each other. The war lasted eleven years. Fortunately, the Five Nations had made a treaty of neutrality (Aug. 4, 1701) with the French in Canada, and thus became an impassable barrier against the savages from the St. Lawrence. The tribes from the Merrimac to the Penobscot had made a treaty of peace with New England (July, 1703); but the French induced them to violate it; and before the close of that summer a furious Indian raid occurred along the whole frontier from Casco to Wells. So indiscriminate was the slaughter that even Quakers were massacred. The immediate cause of this outbreak seems to have been an attack upon and plunder of the trading-post of the young Baron de Castine, at the mouth of the Penobscot. In March, 1704, a party of French and Indians attacked Deerfield, on the Connecticut River, killed forty of the inhabitants, burned the village, and carried away 112 captives. Similar scenes occurred elsewhere. Remote settlements were abandoned, and fie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Artesian Wells, (search)
Artesian Wells, Wells formed by boring through upper soil to strata containing water which has percolated from a higher level. and which rises to that level through the boring-tube. The following are some of the deepest wells in the United States: Location.Depth.Bored.Remarks. St. Louis, Mo2,197 ft.1849-52108,000 gallons daily. Salty. St. Louis, Mo3,843 ft.1866-70Does not rise to the surface. Salty. Louisville, Ky,2,086 ft.1856-57330,000 gallons daily. Mineral. Columbus, O.2,77Wells formed by boring through upper soil to strata containing water which has percolated from a higher level. and which rises to that level through the boring-tube. The following are some of the deepest wells in the United States: Location.Depth.Bored.Remarks. St. Louis, Mo2,197 ft.1849-52108,000 gallons daily. Salty. St. Louis, Mo3,843 ft.1866-70Does not rise to the surface. Salty. Louisville, Ky,2,086 ft.1856-57330,000 gallons daily. Mineral. Columbus, O.2,775 1/2 ft. Water saline, 91° Fahr.: no force Charleston, S. C.1,250 ft.184828,800 gallons daily. Saline. South Dakota, sometimes called the Artesian State, has many powerful artesian wells in the valley of the James River, from 800 to 1,600 feet deep, affording a bountiful supply of pure water. The water from great depths is always warmer than at the surface. One of the most remarkable attempts to sink an artesian well in the United Slates was made in Galveston, Tex. A depth of 3,070 f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chicago, (search)
performed acts of heroism. Meanwhile, Captain Heald had made terms for surrender, and the massacre was stayed. The prisoners were distributed among the captors, and were finally reunited or restored to their friends and families. In this affair, twelve children, who were in a wagon, all the masculine civilians excepting Mr. Kinzie and his sons, three officers, and twenty-six private soldiers were murdered. On the following day the fort was burned by the Indians. Among the slain was Captain Wells, Mrs. Heald's uncle, who came from Fort Wayne with some mounted Miamis who were friendly. He knew the danger, and had hastened to attempt to divert it. He was too late, for the fort was abandoned when he arrived. His cowardly Miamis fled at the first onset of the Pottawatomies, and he was crushed by overwhelming numbers. The fort was re-established in 1816, and was occupied until 1837. The last vestige of it—a block-house—was demolished in 1856. A town was laid out near the fort
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colleges for women. (search)
es, having 2,441 professors and instructors, 20,548 students and $3,236,416 in total income. The institutions exclusively for women, organized on the general basis of college requirements, were divided into two classes. The first comprised the following: Mills College, in Mills College Station, Cal.; Rockford College, Rockford, Ill.; Women's College, Baltimore, Md.; Radcliffe, in Cambridge; Smith, in Northampton; Mount Holyoke, in South Hadley; Wellesley, in Wellesley—all in Massachusetts; Wells, in Aurora; Elmira, in Elmira: Barnard, in New York City; and Vassar, in Poughkeepsie—all in New York; Bryn Mawr, Bryn Mawr, Pa.; and Randolph-Macon Women's College, Lynchburg, Va. These colleges had 543 professors and instructors, 4,606 students, seventeen fellowships, 254 scholarships, $6,390,398 invested in grounds and buildings, $4,122,473 invested in productive funds, and $1,244,350 in total income. The second division, which comprised institutions under the corporate name of colleges
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
..1898 Anglo-American League organized in London......July 13, 1898 United States and Canadian joint high commission meet in Quebec......Aug. 23, 1898 John Hay appointed Secretary of State......Sept. 30, 1898 Battle-ship Illinois launched at Newport News......Oct. 4, 1898 United States Supreme Court decdies Joint Traffic Association case against the railroads......Oct. 24, 1898 The captured Spanish cruiser Infanta Maria Theresa abandoned in a gale......Nov. 1, 1898 David A. Wells dies at Norwich, Conn.......Nov. 5, 1898 General elections result in a small Republican majority in the next House of Representatives......Nov. 8, 1898 Gen. Don Carlos Buell dies at Louisville, Ky.......Nov. 19, 1898 Provision made for a national exposition of American products in the city of Philadelphia......Dec. 21, 1898 General Woods succeeds General Brooke in Cuba......1899 John Russell Young, librarian of Congress, dies at Washington, D. C.......Jan. 17, 1899 The
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wells, David Ames 1828-1898 (search)
Wells, David Ames 1828-1898 Economist; born in Springfield, Mass., June 17, 1828; graduated at Williams College in 1847 and at the Lawrence Scientific School 1851; appointed assistant professor in the last institution; chairman of a commission to consider the best way to raise money by taxation for the needs of the government in 1866; special commissioner of revenue in 1866-70; and became a member of the board of arbitration for railroads in 1879. He was a voluminous writer on economic s. He was a voluminous writer on economic subjects. His publications include Our burden and strength; The creed of free-trade; Production and distribution of wealth; Why we trade and how we trade; The silver question, or the dollar of the fathers vs. The dollar of the Sons; Report of the United States revenue commission; Our merchant marine: how it rose, increased, became Great, declined, and decayed; Relation of tariff to wages, David Ames Wells. etc. He died in Norwich, Conn., Nov. 5, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wells, Fargo & co. (search)
Wells, Fargo & co. See Fargo, William George.