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nth Iowa, Twenty-second and Twenty-seventh Illinois on the right, Col. Fouke in the centre, and the Thirty-first, Col. Logan, on the left, and two guns from Taylor's battery, the other four being in a corn-field in the rear. At nine o'clock the fight began, Col. Buford, of the Twenty-seventh, opening. Our boys gave three cheers and fired, and it was returned by infantry, and the artillery firing shell. The first shell exploded in the ranks of the Seventh Iowa, wounding three and killing John Wells, a private. Col. Fouke received an order to charge, and he did it and was ably sustained by Col. Logan. After a few more rounds, they were driven into their encampment, and Cols. Fouke and Logan were in their position on a rising hill. At this time, Col. Dougherty came up with the Twenty-second. Another charge was made, and our troops were in possession of their encampment, passing over a large number of dead bodies. This was about two o'clock, when an order came to burn their encam
lls on the Maryland side, from which the whole action could be seen. While the vessels were firing into the woods, our guns at Budd's Ferry sent a few shells across. The rebel batteries directly opposite, at Shipping Point, returned the fire. Several of their shells exploded on this side without doing any damage, and one of ours burst right in their upper battery. The rebels ran in every direction. In the mean time I had descended in the balloon and embarked in a boat which Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, commanding the First Massachusetts regiment, had kindly placed at my disposal, with a crew under Lieutenant Carruth, and was on my way up to the flotilla. The Anacostia fired twenty shrapnel, one five-second and two ten-second shell. The Jacob Bell fired seventeen six-inch and fifteen eight-inch shell. Fifty-seven were fired altogether. The Jacob Bell then went close to the shore, and Lieutenant McCrea, with four men in a small boat, accompanied by another boat from the Anaco
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the First battle of Manassas. (search)
eliberate, and not to fire without an object under sight, and gave the word to fire. This fire, with Jackson's, which was no doubt simultaneous, was so destructive that it utterly disabled the Ricketts battery for all efficient purposes. I am not sure, but I am under the impression, that it never fired upon us more than once, if that. Three times was it taken and retaken before the enemy gave up the struggle to retain it. I bad a number of men wounded at the guns--two of them, James and John Wells, brothers, wounded on one of the guns; and James, although shot through the lungs, is still living and able to do a day's work as a post and rail fencer. Indeed, such was the impetuosity of one of these charges — the first, I think — that two of my men, Kirkpatrick and Suddoth, penetrated so deeply into the enemy's lines that they could not fall back with their comrades when repulsed, but remained in the confused masses of the enemy, unnoticed I presume, until another charge, which almost
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wells, John 1770-1823 (search)
Wells, John 1770-1823 Jurist; born in Cherry Valley, N. Y., in 1770; graduated at Princeton College in 1788; admitted to the bar in 1791; made a justice of the peace in 1797; and won popularity by his skill in replying through the Evening post to an attack upon the Federalists by James Cheetham in an article which appeared in The American citizen. Later he conducted the papers entitled The Federalist, though they received a final revision by Alexander Hamilton. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 7, 1823.
ry force. Petitions were presented of James W. White, and eighty others of Grafton, and of the commissioned officers of the Twelfth Regiment of Infantry (Colonel Webster), severally for an act to legalize the appropriations of cities and towns in behalf of the volunteer militia, and for other purposes. Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. May 15. In the Senate.—Petition of Robert Morris and seventy-one others, for a law authorizing colored men to form military companies; of John Wells and others, of Chicopee, for a law to allow cities and towns to raise money for the support of volunteers and their families. On motion of Mr. Carter, of Hampden, a joint committee was appointed to consider the expediency of tendering the service of members of the Legislature free of expense. Mr. Stone, of Essex, reported a bill regulating drill companies, also in favor of the bill for the establishment of a home guard. On motion of Mr. Boynton, of Worcester, it was voted, that the
hand to cross them over the river, and a conveyance on the other side to take them to Atchison the same night. The next night, nothing daunted by their recent jail experience, the same party crossed in a flat boat to Missouri, captured from the rebel farmers horses enough to mount themselves, and returned again, after giving the people thereabouts a good scare. The evening following, a negro came to their headquarters at Pardee, eight miles from Atchison, and said that his rebel master, John Wells by name, and living twelve miles south of St. Joseph, was to leave the next morning for Price's army with two wagon loads of goods and a coffin full of arms. The company started over immediately, the negro acting as guide. The rebel was found, and so were the goods, consisting of bacon, flour, sugar, coffee, tobacco, whiskey, powder, and lead, but no arms. Demand was made for the latter, but the prisoner denied having any. A lariat was then thrown over his neck, and drawn tight for a f
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
, Lucas B. Chapin, Silas Mosman; in 1864, Sylvanus Adams, William R. Kentfield, Henry S. Herrick, Pliny Cadwell, George H. Knapp; in 1865, George H. Knapp, Henry S. Herrick, Simon G. Southworth, Russell S. Farney, Charles S. Stiles. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years was Lester Dickenson. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters connected with the war, was held on the 1st of May; at which the following preamble and resolution were offered by Hon. John Wells, and adopted:— Whereas the Government of the United States is now engaged in a struggle for the maintenance of the Constitution and laws, and whereas the continuance and preservation of our free institutions and the liberties of the people are involved in the contest; therefore— Resolved, That it is the duty of every town to contribute, to the extent of its means, to the promotion of the common cause of sustaining the Government in this crisis of its peril. June 17th, Three t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers killed in action. (search)
Weldon, Thomas,16th Mass. Inf.,Williamsburg Road, Va.,June 18, 1862. Weller, Edwin J., 2d Lieut.,28th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va.,Dec. 13, 1862. Wellington, Alpheus B.,32d Mass. Inf.,Laurel Hill, Va.,May 12, 1864. Wellington, Justus C.,15th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Wells, George,56th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 10, 1864. Wells, George,22d Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,June 18, 1864. Wells, George D., Bvt. Brig. Gen.,U. S. Vols.,Cedar Creek, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Wells, John,21st Mass. Inf.,Chantilly, Va.,Sept. 1, 1862. Wenborn, Charles F.,35th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Wentworth, Albert F.,1st Mass. Inf.,Blackburn's Ford, Va.,July 18, 1861. Wentworth, Benning,22d Mass. Inf.,Malvern Hill, Va.,July 1, 1862. Wentworth, Edwin O.,37th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Wentworth, Nelson, Corp.,30th Mass. Inf.,Cedar Creek, Va.,Oct. 19, 1864. West, Edward P.,7th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. West, Edward S.,24th Mass. Inf.,De
Weldon, Thomas,16th Mass. Inf.,Williamsburg Road, Va.,June 18, 1862. Weller, Edwin J., 2d Lieut.,28th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va.,Dec. 13, 1862. Wellington, Alpheus B.,32d Mass. Inf.,Laurel Hill, Va.,May 12, 1864. Wellington, Justus C.,15th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Wells, George,56th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 10, 1864. Wells, George,22d Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,June 18, 1864. Wells, George D., Bvt. Brig. Gen.,U. S. Vols.,Cedar Creek, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Wells, John,21st Mass. Inf.,Chantilly, Va.,Sept. 1, 1862. Wenborn, Charles F.,35th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Wentworth, Albert F.,1st Mass. Inf.,Blackburn's Ford, Va.,July 18, 1861. Wentworth, Benning,22d Mass. Inf.,Malvern Hill, Va.,July 1, 1862. Wentworth, Edwin O.,37th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Wentworth, Nelson, Corp.,30th Mass. Inf.,Cedar Creek, Va.,Oct. 19, 1864. West, Edward P.,7th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. West, Edward S.,24th Mass. Inf.,De
Welch, William, 429 Welcome, W. H., 429 Weld, F. M., x, XIII Weld, H. N., 166 Weld, S. H., Jr., 558 Weld, S. M., 302 Weldon (or Wellman), C. C., 558 Weldon, J. F., 487 Weldon, Thomas, 430 Weller, E. J., 79, 430 Welles, Gideon, 42 Wellington, A. B., 430 Wellington, C. H., 487 Wellington, G. W., 558 Wellington, J. C., 430 Wells, G. D., 51, 91, 103, 107, 111, 112, 140, 260, 430 Wells, George, 22d Mass. Inf., 430 Wells, George, 56th Mass. Inf., 430 Wells, J. Y., 487 Wells, John, 430 Wells, Joseph, 487 Wells, Samuel, 558 Welsh, J., 558 Welsh, P. E., 558 Wenborn, C. F., 430 Wennell, Waldo, 558 Wentworth, A. F., 430 Wentworth, Benning, 430 Wentworth, E. O., 430 Wentworth, H. D., 495 Wentworth, L. E., 75, 316 Wentworth, M. A., 487 Wentworth, Nelson, 430 Wescott, A. A., 558 Wescott, G. W., 558 Wesselhoeft, Reinhold, 135 Wessle, E. S., 558 West, E. P., 430 West, E. R., 558 West, E. S., 430 West, J. B., 123, 487 West, J. G., 558 West, Milo, 487
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