Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Welsh or search for John Welsh in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
aniel Swisher, James Swisher, Wm. W. Smallwood, Alexander Stuart, S. W. Stuart, J. G. Stuart, William M. Sterrett, Samuel W. Sterrett, H. L. Terrill, James Terrill, F. H. Templeton, Arch. Taylor, William Taylor, Howard H. Thompson, John F. Tribbett, William Vines, A. H. Weir, William N. Wilson, Thomas M. Wilson, M. D. Wilson, Samuel N. Wilson, John Edgar Wilson, John W. Wheat, James Withers, H. A. Withers, John H. Whitmore, William Wright, John R. Wright, J. Alpheus Wilson, Robert Wilson, John Welsh, Matthew X. White, William A. Walker, Cyrus Walker, Dr. Z. J. Walker, Alexander Walker, Samuel H. Weir, Arch. Withrow, James H. Wilson, Howard Wilson, Samuel B. Walker. Killed—A. A. Moore; Robert McChesney, bushwhacked near St. George, Tucker county, in 1861; Andrew Ervin, killed at Bratton's farm; Howard Houston, in battle, 1864; James Lockridge in battle in 1863; A. B. Mackey, at Moorefield, W. Va., in 1864; H. Rudd Morrison, in 1862; John F. Tribbett, at Monocacy in 1864; Samuel B.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
otto, Ne ville vellis on it. Mr. Semmes had married a Miss Neville, and beneath the marriage date was painted in black, 1640. Mr. T. J. Semmes' mother was a woman of remarkable intelligence. She was a member of a prominent and wealthy family of Maryland, who had come over with Lord Baltimore, and settled in St. Mary's county, Maryland. His father was Raphael Semmes, uncle of the world-renowned Confederate Admiral, and commander of the Alabama. On the maternal side, Mr. Semmes' family were Welsh-Catholic. His grandfathers were both extensive land owners in Charles county, Maryland. Speaking of his mother, Mr. Semmes said: She was a woman of great variety of information and sweetest culture. Her strength of mind was remarkable, and this wonderful faculty she retained unimpaired up to the ripe age of eighty, when she died. That was seventeen years ago. She was largely instrumental in the formation of the character of her children, and to her careful training and watchful care