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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
r of American religion; and Gerrit Smith, speaking to this text, said: I do not hesitate to make the remark, infidel though it may seem in the eyes of many, that were all the religion of this land—the good, bad, and mixed—to be this day blotted out, there would remain as much ground as there now is to hope for the speedy termination of American slavery. Lib. 11.7. The sooner, added Mr. Garrison, this truth is realized by abolitionists, Lib. 11.7. the better. When we go into a place, said Wendell Phillips at Weymouth, speaking as an anti-slavery July 2, 1841; Lib. 11.123. lecturer, we know, we feel instantly, whether the minister is for or against us. We judge instinctively. But that the presumption was that the minister would be adverse, is clear from such a report on the attitude of the clergy Lib. 11.173. as was made for Middlesex, one of the largest counties in Massachusetts, yet within easy radius of Boston, the Liberator office, and the engine of the State anti-slavery mac
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
of Elizur Wright, jr., wabbles around a centre somewhere between 25 Cornhill [the Liberator and A. S. Offices] and the South End (meaning 11 West St., the house of H. G. and M. W. Chapman) (Ms. Jan. 29, 1843, Quincy to Webb). themselves, viz., Wendell Phillips, Caroline Weston, and myself. We urged that the removal was to all intents and purposes a dissolution; that it would be but the Mass. Society with another name; that it was unnecessary to give pro-slavery and New Organization such a e of a removal of the Society, the services of the Boston friends on whom they depended would be secured; for that I thought, from what I knew of their opinions, that they regarded the measure as so unwise that they would decline taking office. Wendell W. Phillips. confirmed what I said. This was an unexpected damper. Garrison dilated his nostrils like a war-horse, and snuffed indignation at us. If the Boston friends were unwilling to take the trouble and responsibility, then there was no
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
now, for to-day he comes. N. P. Rogers to Elizabeth Pease. Ms. begun Apr. 4, 1844, in Concord, N. H., resumed July 25, and finished in Boston. Fragmentary. W. Phillips. Here a break-off again, and it is now Dec. 23, 1844, and I am at Francis Jackson's in Boston, just creeping up from a threemonths' sickness, with system irrecoverably broken up. Herald of Freedom stopped by the violence of Foster, one of my old coadjutors. He is backed up by Garrison himself, by Quincy, Mrs. Chapman, Wendell, and I don't know by whom else of those once my lovers. They know nothing about the merits of the case, which was merely this. Foster got a notion the S. S. Foster. publisher of the paper, John R. French, was receiving too many donations, and himself too few—which [last was] true enough, though he was so rudely radical and so offensive nobody could fancy him enough to sustain him much. French was publishing the paper nominally for the N. H. Society, but actually not. [He was] publishing
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
lance Committee, he received Frederick Douglass and determined his destination ( Life of Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 205.) In December, 1847, Dr. Ruggles, hearing of his relapse, had Ms. Dec. 6, 1847. offered Mr. Garrison gratuitous treatment; but not until the following July did the patient present himself. July 17, 1848. Edmund Quincy, with inexhaustible self-abnegation, again granted this release to his friend by assuming the Lib. 18.110. conduct of the Liberator, while Francis Jackson and Wendell MSS. July 13, 1848, W. L. G. to F. Jackson; Oct. 5 (?), Phillips to Jackson. Phillips conspired with others to defray Garrison's personal expenses and lighten his domestic burden. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Northampton, July 18, 1848. Ms. The trip in the cars to this place, yesterday, was much more pleasant than the one I took with Fanny, as the heat was much Helen Frances Garrison. less intense; but the dust and smoke were quite as disagreeable—so that I was not sorry when I
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
f West India emancipation, and at the fine anniversary of the American Society in New Lib. 19.78. York; Our meetings, he wrote to his wife (Ms. May 9, 1849), were never before so well attended, and I think never was a deeper impression made. Wendell [Phillips] has, if possible, surpassed himself—he is so ready, so eloquent, so morally true, so sublimely great, that I know not what we should do without him. He is really one of the best and noblest specimens of humanity in this world. he attethe last three or four years, have had the strongest proofs of his attachment. He would almost smother them beneath a tornado of kisses; his embraces were given with intense vital energy, and with a will. He had not a vicious quality. . . . Wendell informs me that he has received a most generous W. Phillips. donation from you towards a fund intended for the benefit of my family, which a few friends are kindly endeavoring to raise, and of which I have known nothing until recently. Be assu
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
to make my speech about the religion of the country, when, at last, the pent — up feelings of the mobocrats broke out, and, with the notorious Capt. Rynders at their head, they came rushing on to the platform, yelling, cheering, swearing, etc., etc. But, after much tumult and many interruptions, I got through with my speech—then Mr. Furness Rev. W. H. Furness. made a capital speech—then an opponent spoke—then F. Douglass. Douglass and Samuel Ward—and we wound up with electrical effect. Wendell had no time to speak. But the mail will close instanter. W. Phillips. No part of this for the press. The N. Y. papers will tell the story to-morrow. The Tabernacle was a Congregational place of worship, on the northeast corner of Broadway and Anthony (now Worth) Street. The revivalist Finney had formerly C. G. Finney. preached there. It was a large hall, nearly square, on the ground floor, with a gentle descent from the entrance. The platform faced this entrance, with tiers of
xistence of slavery. Penn. Freeman. What is stranger, perhaps, Uncle Tom did not tell on the vote of the anti-slavery political party in this Presidential year, 1852. To this party we must now give some attention, beginning with a retrospect. Nothing, said the editor of the Liberator, in January, 1849, can be more superficial or more destitute of principle than the Free Soil movement Lib. 19.6, 7.; and at the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in the same month, Wendell Jan. 24-26. Phillips moved a resolve that abolitionists could not look Lib. 19.19. on the Free Soil Party as an anti-slavery party in any proper sense of the term. Of the Liberty Party papers which had turned Free Soil in order to survive, Mr. Garrison declared that they had all lost vigor and anti-slavery character, and that their latter state is worse than their former; and that was deplorable enough. Lib. 19.6, [94]. In this year the Barnburner element in New York returned to its Li