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Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 9 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters. You can also browse the collection for Barrett Wendell or search for Barrett Wendell in all documents.

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ese productions which caught the fancy of a whole American generation. It expressed one phase of the national mind in a given historical period. The historian of literature is bound to take account of this question of literary vogue, as it is highly significant of the temper of successive generations in any country. But it is of peculiar interest to the student of the literature produced in the United States. Is this literature American, or is it English literature in America, as Professor Wendell and other scholars have preferred to call it? I should be one of the last to minimize the enormous influence of England upon the mind and the writing of all the Englishspeaking countries of the globe. Yet it will be one of the purposes of the present book to indicate the existence here, even in colonial times, of a point of view differing from that of the mother country, and destined to differ increasingly with the lapse of time. Since the formation of our Federal Union, in particul
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 3: the third and fourth generation (search)
It is divided into seven books, and proceeds, by methods entirely unique, to tell of Pilgrim and Puritan divines and governors, of Harvard College, of the churches of New England, of marvelous events, of Indian wars; and in general to justify, as only a member of the Mather dynasty could justify, the ways of God to Boston men. Hawthorne and Whittier, Longfellow and Lowell knew this book well and found much honey in the vast carcass. To have had four such readers and a biographer like Barrett Wendell must be gratifying to Cotton Mather in Paradise. The Diary of Mather's fellow-townsman Judge Samuel Sewall has been read more generally in recent years than anything written by Mather himself. It was begun in 1673, nine years earlier than the first entry in Mather's Diary, and it ends in 1729, while Mather's closes in 1724. As a picture of everyday happenings in New England, Sewall's Diary is as far superior to Mather's as Pepys's Diary is to George Fox's Journal in painting the E
merican Literature to the close of the Revolution is given in M. C. Tyler's History of American literature during the colonial time, 2 volumes (1878) and Literary history of the American Revolution, 2 volumes (1897). For a general survey see Barrett Wendell, A literary history of America (1900), W. P. Trent, American literature (1903), G. E. Woodberry, America in literature (1903), W. C. Bronson, A short history of American literature (1903), with an excellent bibliography, W. B. Cairns, Histornal (1898), J. Winthrop, Journal (1825, 1826), also Life and letters by R. C. Winthrop, 2 volumes (1863), G. L. Walker, Thomas Hooker (1891), 0. S. Straus, Roger Williams (1894), Cotton Mather, Diary, 2 volumes (1911, 1912), also his Life by Barrett Wendell (1891), Samuel Sewall, Diary, 3 volumes (1878). For Jonathan Edwards, see Works, 4 volumes (1852), his Life by A. V. G. Allen (1889), Selected sermons edited by H. N. Gardiner (1904). The most recent edition of Franklin's Works is edited by
44 Virginia House of Burgesses, address of the, Jefferson 80 Virginians, the, Thackeray 45 Vision of Sir Launfal, the, Lowell 170, 172 Walden, Thoreau 131, 134, 135 Walley, Thomas, 41 Warner, C. D., 93 Washington, George, 64-65, 66, 77-78 Waterfowl, to a, Bryant 103, 106 Webster, Daniel, eulogy for Adams and Jefferson, 86-87; civic note in oratory of, 208; criticism of Clay, 210; his oratory, 211-15 Week on the Concord and Merrimac rivers, a, Thoreau 131 Wendell, Barrett, 6 West, The, in American literature, 237 et seq. Westchester farmer, the, Seabury 76 When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloomed, Whitman 201 When the Frost is on the Punkin, Riley 248 Whitaker, Alexander, 26-27, 38 Whitman, Walt, in 1826, 90; in New York, 108; life and writings, 196-205; died (1892), 255; typically American, 265; argues for American books, 266 Whittier, J. G., in 1826, 90; attitude towards Transcendentalism, 143; life and writings 157-64; died (1892), 255