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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 66 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 60 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 23 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 15 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John A. Wharton or search for John A. Wharton in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
nd Bowen's brigades; and the Reserve under Gen. John C. Breckinridge. This latter comprised the following commands: Third Kentucky, Col. A. P. Thompson; Fourth Kentucky, Col. R. P. Trabue; Fifth Kentucky (afterward called the Ninth), Col. Thomas H. Hunt; Sixth Kentucky, Col. Joseph H. Lewis; Col. Crew's regiment, Clifton's battalion, Hale's battalion, Helm's cavalry battalion, Morgan's squadron of cavalry, Nelson's cavalry, Lyon's (Cobb's) battery. Col. N. B. Forrest's cavairy, and Col. John A. Wharton's cavalry (Eighth Texas), were unattached. On the 28th of February, no movement from Nashville having been meanwhile made against General Johnston, he put his army in motion for Decatur, Ala., via Shelbyville, reaching the former place on the 10th of March. Here the Tennessee river, then at flood-height, was crossed, and by the 25th of March General Johnston completed the concentration of his army at Corinth. This included, in addition to the troops brought by him, the command of G
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
On the preceding day, Sunday, General Boyle had issued an order requiring secessionists and suspected persons to give up such arms as they had in their possession. But even before Morgan had ceased to vex the souls of his adversaries, a new cause of consternation occurred in the capture of Murfreesboro by General Forrest, in which he displayed his forte as signally as General Morgan had shown his peculiar genius. On the 13th of July he left Chattanooga with the Texas Rangers of Col. John A. Wharton, and the Second Georgia cavalry of Col. W. J. Lawton, and made a forced march of fifty miles to Altamont, arriving at McMinnville on the night of the 11th. Here he was joined by Col. J. J. Morrison, with a portion of the First Georgia cavalry, two companies of Spiller's battalion under Major Smith, and two companies of Kentuckians under Capts. W. J. Taylor and Waltham, increasing his force to 1,400. Resting until 1p. m. on the 12th he marched for Murfreesboro, fifty miles, and arri
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
l. W. G. M. Davis; Marion artillery, Capt. J. M. Martin. First cavalry brigade, Col. Benj. Allston:—First Tennessee cavalry, Col. H. M. Ashby; Second Tennessee cavalry, Col. J. B. McLinn; Third Tennessee cavalry, Col. J. W. Starnes; First Georgia cavalry, Col. J. J. Morrison; Howitzer battery, First-Lieut. G. A. Huwald. Second cavalry brigade, Col. N. B. Forrest:—First Kentucky cavalry, Lieut.-Col. T. G. Woodward; First Louisiana cavalry, Col. Jno. S. Scott; Eighth Texas cavalry, Col. J. A. Wharton. On the 9th of August General Bragg added to General Smith's command from his own, the brigades of Generals Cleburne and Preston Smith, forming temporarily a fourth division under Cleburne, and also Gen. T. J. Churchill's division, including the brigades of McCray and McNair, constituting the third division of General Smith's army. On the 9th, General Smith, in a letter to General Bragg, says that from Buell's present position Sparta would seem to be one of his natural lines int
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
ardee's corps to the west side of Chaplin's fork. About two and a half miles north of Perryville, Doctor's creek, a small stream from the southwest, empties into Chaplin's fork, and near this junction was Cheatham's right. Upon his right was Wharton's cavalry, while Wheeler's cavalry covered the left wing of the army. In the meantime General McCook, who did not march from Mackville until 5 a. m., had arrived with Rousseau's and Jackson's divisions and made his dispositions as directed, on perfect view of the battlefield. The ground rising by a gentle ascent and consisting of cultivated farms with little timber, a panorama was presented such as is rarely witnessed except on canvas Cheatham's movement, supplemented by a charge of Wharton's cavalry, had proved a perfect success, taking the enemy by surprise, capturing one or more batteries and doubling up his line in confusion. In the first onset, Gen. J. S. Jackson, a Kentuckian commanding a division; General Terrill, a cous
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
fall back gradually before enemy, reporting by couriers every hour. When near our line, Wheeler will move to right and Wharton to the left to cover and protect our flanks and report movements of the enemy. Pegram to fall to the rear and report toal commanding as reserve. 9. To-night if the enemy has gained his position in our front ready for action, Wheeler and Wharton with their whole commands will make a night march to the right and left, turn the enemy's flanks, gain his rear and vigoish it on the crest, so as to at once hold it and enfilade the enemy's lines on the other side of the river. Pegram and Wharton, who, with some cavalry and a battery were beyond the point where my right would rest, when the new line of battle shou rout the enemy. Feeling anxious about my right, I sent two staff officers in succession to communicate with Pegram and Wharton, but received no intelligence up to the moment of assault. The interval between my left and the troops on the hill was
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix B. (search)
s, are, I suppose, at Corinth. One regiment of Hardee's division, Lieutenant-Colonel Patton commanding, is moving by cars today (20th March), and Statham's brigade, Crittenden's division. The brigade will halt at Iuka, the regiment at Burnsville. Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment at Burnsville, and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, and Helm's cavalry at Tuscumbia; Bowen's brigade at Courtland; Breckinridge's brigade here; the regiments of cavalry of Adams and Wharton on the opposite bank of the river; Scott's Louisiana cavalry at Pulaski, sending forward supplies; Morgan's cavalry at Shelbyville, ordered on. Tomorrow Breckinridge's brigade will go to Corinth; then Bowen's. When these pass Tuscumbia and Iuka, transportation will be ready there to further other troops to follow immediately from these points, and if necessary from Burnsville. The cavalry will cross and move forward as soon as their trains can be passed over the railroad bridge. I have t