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res and workingmen generally, and were officered by such young men as the governor and council deemed best fitted. The Levee had been scoured and a battalion of Tigers formed from the very lowest of the thugs and plugs that infested it, for Major Bob Wheat, the well-known filibuster. Poor Wheat! His roving spirit still and his jocund voice now mute, he sleeps soundly under the sighing trees of Hollywood-that populous city of the silent at Richmond. It was his corps of which such wild andWheat! His roving spirit still and his jocund voice now mute, he sleeps soundly under the sighing trees of Hollywood-that populous city of the silent at Richmond. It was his corps of which such wild and ridiculous stories of bowie-knife prowess were told at the Bull Run fight. They, together with the Crescent rifles, Chasseurs-à--pied and Zouaves, were now at Pensacola. The Rifles was a crack corps, composed of some of the best young men in New Orleans; and the whole corps of Chasseurs was of the same material. They did yeomen's service in the four years, and the last one saw very few left of what had long since ceased to be a separate organization. But of all the gallant blood that wa
to-day for the West, to assume the colonelcy of the Third regiment in Wise's brigade. Frank Anderson will be his lieutenant-colonel. Colonel Charles Carroll Hicks is a lieutenant in a company of Colonel McLaw's regiment, now at Yorktown. General Bob Wheat greatly distinguished himself as commander of a New Orleans military corps at Manassas. Major O'Hara, of Cuban fame, has a commission in the army. Colonel Rudler, I see, is raising a company for the war in Georgia. An English filibuster,nel McLaw's regiment, now at Yorktown. General Bob Wheat greatly distinguished himself as commander of a New Orleans military corps at Manassas. Major O'Hara, of Cuban fame, has a commission in the army. Colonel Rudler, I see, is raising a company for the war in Georgia. An English filibuster, one Major Atkins, a tall, big-whiskered, loose-trowsered, haw-haw specimen of a Londoner, who was with Garibaldi in Sicily, and who is just over, fought gallantly by the side of Wheat, at Manassas.
at all my readers will feel an interest in the mother of glorious Bob Wheat, I will here transcribe a small portion. In one letter she says,d was rector of St. Paul's Church I You know, our second son, I. T Wheat, was Secretary of the Secession Committee when Louisiana seceded, as which belonged to ‘The days that are no more.’ Chapter 10: Bob Wheat. the boy and the man. (Communicated.) In the early summer of arters, where he soon recovered health and became a pet. This was Bob Wheat, son of an Episcopal clergyman, and he had left school to come toDame Fortune too long to be cast down by her frowns. Suddenly Major Wheat near by sprung from his horse with a cry of Percy, old boy I Whyercy Windham, an Englishman in the Federal service, had parted from Wheat in Italy, where the pleasant business of killing was then going on,nd now fraternized with his friend in the manner described. Poor Wheat month later he slept his last sleep on the bloody battle-field of C
ing disabled by severe illness, Col. Isaac G. Seymour commanded the Louisiana brigade. In the afternoon, at the charge at Cold Harbor, he was shot from his horse and died in a few minutes. Here also fell Maj. Robert Wheat, known familiarly as Bob Wheat, cheeriest of souls, and not a stranger to the enemy, who remembered him as the chief of the Tigers at Manassas. The Louisiana brigade fought desperately at Gaines' Mill, attacked in front and flank, and for hours without reinforcements, and leventh and Eighth suffered in the bloody charge, ordered at dusk, by an officer unknown to Colonel Stafford, losing the main part of the brigade casualties, 24 killed and 94 wounded. Capt. L. D. Nicholls, Eighth, and Lieutenants Foley and Pitman, Wheat's battalion, were killed at Cold Harbor, and Lieutenants Francis and McCauley, Sixth; Lieutenant Newport, Seventh; and Lieutenant LeBlanc, Eighth, were among the killed at Malvern Hill. The other Louisiana commands were with that part of the a
oula Guerrillas, of the St. Paul Foot Rifles, which during the Seven Days had been consolidated with the battalion of Lieut.-Col. G. Coppens. Lieutenant Colonel Nicholls, of the Eighth, was promoted to colonel of the new Fifteenth, and held that rank until October 14th, 1862, when he became brigadier-general, and Lieut.-Col. Edmund Pendleton took command of the regiment. The remaining three companies of the St. Pauls' were permitted to make individual re-enlistments in any command desired. Wheat's battalion passed under the same order of disbandment, with equal privilege of re-enlistment. The First Louisiana brigade, thereafter known as Hays' brigade, including the Louisiana Guard artillery, remained attached to Ewell's division, Jackson's corps. The Second Louisiana brigade after moving to Gordonsville under Colonel Stafford, in August, was assigned to the same corps, in Jackson's old division, and a week later Gen. W. E. Starke, who had served in West Virginia in command of a Vi
Wheat's battalion. This battalion, which came from Louisiana early in the war 500 strong has been reduced by various causes to about 150 effective men. Being active participants in Jackson's campaign in the Valley, they have marched 200 miles within a short period, and fought in nine different engagements. On Monday, the 9th inst., near Port Republic, they were in the glorious bayonet charge which resulted in the capture of the Yankee battery. In this charge Major Wheat's horse was shot through the head within twenty yards of the guns, after which he led his command on foot, and was the first field officer who reached the coveted prize. Of eight offe, Cockroft, McCarthy, Ripley, and Adjutant Bruce Putnam--and thirty casualties occurred among the ninety-five men carried into action. The officers and men of Major Wheat's battalion think that his gallantry in this and many other battles entitles him to promotion. He has sacrificed much and suffered much in the cause of his cou
ded. His Lieut. Col., De Choine, was shot through the lungs, and after again and again endeavoring to hold his place on the field, was borne off almost insensible. This regiment, one of whose companies was led by Capt. D. A. Wilson, of our town, carried into the fight but three hundred and eight effective men, the rest being sick or detailed on other service, of whom one hundred and fifty-eight were killed or wounded. Onward they rushed, sustained by the 6th, 8th, 9th, the Tigers, under Bob Wheat, and the Virginia regiment, all doing their duty like heroes. They dare the battery. Volumes on volumes of shot continue to salute their advance — but they do advance. They strike their bayonets and sabres into the artillerists as they serve the guns, they kill the horses, they seize the guns, they take the battery, and the victory is accomplished. Proud day and proud honor this for those who did this gallant deed! Jackson, Ewell, and Taylor were present, cheering on the fight. Every