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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
le of the above paragraph (the whole letter is in Slidell's handwriting) is given on this page. I am indebted to the Hon. Mark D. Wilbur, afterward in the National military service at Baton Rouge, for the original. was chosen President, and J. Thomas Wheat, Secretary. J. L. Manning, Signature of Mouton and Wheat. of South Carolina, and J. A. Winston, of Alabama, Commissioners from their respective States, were invited to seats in the Convention, and made vehement speeches in favor of secessWheat. of South Carolina, and J. A. Winston, of Alabama, Commissioners from their respective States, were invited to seats in the Convention, and made vehement speeches in favor of secession. The Governor was formally Fac-Simile of a part of Slidell's letter. thanked by the Convention for seizing the forts. A Committee of Fifteen was appointed to draft an Ordinance of Secession. It reported on the 24th, by their Chairman, John Perkins, Jr., and its ordinance was adopted, two days afterward, by a vote of one hundred and thirteen ayes to seventeen noes. Like Mississippi, Florida, and Alabama, Louisiana, the creature of the National Government, speaking in this ordinance t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 25: the battle of Bull's Run, (search)
wenty-eighth Virginia Volunteers, a company of cavalry, and a light battery. Colonel Evans, with the Fourth South Carolina, a special Louisiana battalion under Colonel Wheat, four 6-pounders, and a company of Virginia cavalry, guarded the Stone Bridge; and Early's brigade, composed of the Seventh and Twenty-fourth Virginia, and Sevg four of his fifteen regiments to guard the Stone Bridge, he hastened with the remaining eleven, composed of South Carolinians under Sloan, and Louisianians under Wheat, with two field-pieces of Latham's battery, to confront the approaching foe. He formed his line not far from the Pittsylvania Mansion of the Carter family, with thader that stopped the flight was known as Stonewall Jackson. It was noon when Bee and Evans fled from the first field of close conflict, with their comrade, Colonel Wheat, desperately wounded, and joined Jackson on the plateau, while the Nationals were pressing closely in pursuit. Johnston and Beauregard, alarmed by the heavy f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
n or no convention to the people, but it failed, and an election of delegates to a convention was ordered to be held on Jan. 8, the anniversary of Jackson's victory at New Orleans. On that occasion the popular vote was small, but it was of such a complexion that the Confederates were hopeful. The convention met at Baton Rouge, Jan. 23. The legislature had convened there on the 21st. The number of delegates in the convention was 130. Ex-Gov. Alexander Mouton was chosen president, and J. Thomas Wheat, secretary. Commissioners from South Carolina and Alabama were there, and were invited to seats in the convention; and they made vehement speeches in favor of secession. A committee of fifteen was appointed to draft an ordinance of secession. It reported on the 24th by their chairman, John Perkins, Jr., and the ordinance then submitted was adopted on the 26th by a vote of 113 against 17. Its phraseology bore the same general features as the ordinances passed by other States. Though
f George M. Pullman, president and founder of Pullman Palace Car Company......Oct. 19, 1897 Francis E. Willard, of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, dies at New York City......Feb. 17, 1898 Break in levee surrounding Shawneetown, on Ohio River, submerges entire city, drowning twenty-four; Governor Tanner sends special train with tents and supplies......April 3, 1898 Body of Miss Frances E. Willard, eminent social reformer and lecturer, cremated in Chicago......April 9, 1898 Wheat speculation engineered by Joseph Leiter collapsed......June 13, 1898 Death of John Moses, historian......July 3, 1898 Chicago daily papers suspend publication on account of a strike......July 25, 1898 Attempt of coal company to land negro miners from Southern States to take the place of striking coal-miners causes bloody fight at Virden; train bearing negroes riddled with bullets; eleven killed, over thirty wounded, several fatally......Oct. 12, 1898 Governor proclaims martial l