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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion (search)
ad nursed him when he was wounded, and another to a lady who had in like manner befriended his younger brother, Captain John Thomas Wheat, who fell at Shiloh. Major Wheat's officers tell us that they had often seen him reading his little book, nighMajor Wheat's officers tell us that they had often seen him reading his little book, night and morning, and that he frequently asked them to listen to such passages as he thought particularly eloquent and impressive. One who slept in the tent with him says that he several times waked him up (when he had retired first) to listen to the e men, and one for which has not our blessed Lord promised to confess us before His Father and the holy angels? While Major Wheat was incapable of professing what he did not feel, and was very far from making a parade of religious feeling, yet, as world when He sees fit; and if He takes me while fighting for liberty, I shall feel that I have not lived in vain. Major Wheat's request to be buried on the battlefield was made the subject of several poems which were published in various papers
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last words of Major Wheat. (search)
The last words of Major Wheat. by H. Bury me on the field, boys! and away to the glorious fight; You will come this way again, boys, in your triumph march to-night, But when you pass this spot, boys, I would not have you sigh— In holy cause of country, boys, who would not gladly die? Bury me on the field, boys, where a soldier loves to rest, And sweet shall be my sleep, boys, upon my country's breast; For she is dearer far, boys, than aught this world can give, And gladly do I die, boys, that she may proudly live. Bury me on the field, boys, and away to meet the foe; Hands that have dug a grave, boys, shall lay their legions low; Eyes that wept this morn, boys, shall smile at close of day, For Southern hearts shall triumph, boys, in the Northerner's dismay. Bury me on the field, boys, and then to make a stand, Which will lose the tyrant's grip, boys, from our Southern sunny land, And teach the invading foe, boys, in Freedom's holy strife, The Southern heart will sever, boy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
h, 7. Washington Artillery of Louisiana, 268, 306. Washington and Lee University, Students of, at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 286, 358. Washington's proposed Final Stand in the Mountains of West Augusta, Va., 323. Washington Shooters, The, 271. Washington Statue, The, 249. Watterson, Henry, 351. West Virginia Troops at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 271. Wheat, General C. R., Memoir of, 47; The Last Words of, lines by H., 59; the death of, 56. Wheat, Captain, John Thomas, 57. Wheat, Leo, 47. Wheeler, General, Joseph, 77. White, Dr. Isaiah H., Surgeon C. S. A., on the Treatment of Prisoners, 383. White, D. D., Rev. J. J., 353 William and Mary College, Students of, at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 286. Williams General, 73. Williamsburg, Account of the battle of, May 5, 1862, by Salem Dutcher, 409. Wilmot Proviso, The, 436. Willis, General, Edward, Notice of, 160; reports of battles of Chancellorsville, 177; of Gettysburg,