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elop more fully the enemy's plan of battle. The reader must picture to himself Wheat's immortal battalion (the Louisiana) and a few other troops still engaged withriver — to Stone Bridge, his object being to disperse the little force under Major Wheat, and allow Tyler's division to cross. Heintzelman was, in some degree, baffrear, leaving sufficient force at the bridge to occupy our small force under Major Wheat. On the left the fight up to this time had been desperate. The attack oof the opposing artillery made fearful havoc. It will be remembered that Major Wheat's Louisiana battalion were left sole defenders of the bridge itself. Althou Stone Bridge, and crossed a few hundred yards higher up, as related above; and Wheat was sent to prevent their junction with the other forces on the same side. As the majority of Wheat's command were Louisiana Irish, they robbed the dead of their whisky, and were in high spirits when ordered to assail Sherman and Keyes. They
he Texan brigade brought into action McClellan's infantry charge defeat of his right wing and centre the field of battle capture of guns and booty death of Major Wheat Confederates in striped pantaloons. Hogan's residence, Lee's temporary quarters, was not far from the river, and I could distinctly see our batteries and trthoughtful, lingered by the camp-fires and talked of the incidents of battle. Among the many who perished on this occasion, none was more regretted than Major Robert Wheat, who had gloriously fallen while charging at the head of his Louisiana Battalion. All regretted the death of this valiant soldier, and many a stout heart was wrung with anguish when it was whispered: Poor Wheat is gone! Bury me on the battle-field, boys! said he, expiring beneath a majestic oak, surrounded by his weather-beaten Spartan heroes-the field is ours, as usual, my boys-bury me on the battle-field! He was interred beneath the lonely, wide-spreading oak, where he had falle
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), An English officer on the battle of Manassas plains. (search)
have befallen the Northern arms. Their army was well appointed, well organized, and provided with a splendid artillery, the entire of which fell into our hands. Wheat's battalion, to which I was attached as a volunteer, consisting of only 400 men, sustained for an hour the shock of at least 8,000 of the enemy, and only retreated when almost cut to pieces. Every officer who was mounted had his horse shot under him. When carrying a message from Wheat to Gen. Evans, my own horse met with a similar fate, and I escaped by a perfect miracle. I must confess that this command was the admiration of friend and foe. Formed in part of Irish, and the rest the flowert I escaped the terrible ordeal of shot and shell, and was honored with the thanks of Gen. Beauregard for some slight service which I performed on the field. Poor Wheat seemed the genius of the fight — conspicuous by his great size and soldier-like mien, his flashing eye and glittering blade — he was seen everywhere in the hottest
Lieutenant Dickinson, of New Orleans, now in this city, and who was shot in the thigh with a Minie ball, in the battle on Sunday, says that he was a member of Major Wheat's battalion, and out of 400, which constituted that command, there were not more than 100 that escaped death and wounds. Wheat was shot through the body, and was surviving on Wednesday, although his case is exceedingly critical. Lieutenant Dickinson also says that the Catahoula (La.) Guerillas, Captain Bahoup, fought witWheat was shot through the body, and was surviving on Wednesday, although his case is exceedingly critical. Lieutenant Dickinson also says that the Catahoula (La.) Guerillas, Captain Bahoup, fought with desperation, and he thinks his command was nearly all killed and wounded. The captain, although for a long time in the hottest of the fight, escaped unhurt. He also says the Tiger Rifles, of Louisiana, in a perfect shower of bullets, bombs, and balls, threw down their rifles and charged upon the enemy's lines with their knives, and put them to flight.--Richmond Enquirer, July 26.
--Gen. Bernard E. Bee, South Carolina; Gen. Francis S. Bartow, Georgia; Col. Nelson, Second Virginia regiment; Col. Fisher, Sixth North Carolina regiment; Col. Mason, of General Johnston's staff; Lieut.-Col. Ben. F. Johnson, Hampton Legion; Major Robert Wheat, Louisiana Battalion. Wounded.--Gen. Kirby Smith, regular army; Col. Wade Hampton, Hampton Legion; Col. L. J. Gartrell, Seventh Virginia regiment; Col. Jones, Fourth Alabama regiment; Col. Thomas, of Gen. Johnston's staff; Col. H. C. Stevens, of Gen. Bee's staff; Major Scott, Fourth Alabama regiment. Gen. Bee, one of their killed, was a West Point cadet of 1844, and won distinction in the Mexican war. Gen. Bartow was a prominent Georgia politician. Major Wheat is a well-known filibuster. He was killed by a sergeant of the Second New Hampshire regiment, while in advance of his battalion, leading them on to the charge, after which they fled in every direction. Gen. Smith is a cadet of 1841, and served with distinction in t
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
Cocke's brigade held Ball's Ford, and Evans with the 4th S. C. and Wheat's La. Battalion held the Stone Bridge, two and three miles to the le. There were only two 6-Pr. guns with the 4th S. C. regiment and Wheat's La. battalion —say 1400 men. There were no other supports within With the remainder of his force (six companies of the 4th S. C. and Wheat's La. battalion) he marched to oppose and delay the turning column,dvance for about an hour. The fighting was not bad for beginners. Wheat's Tigers (the 1st La. battalion) lost 38 in killed and wounded, andwithout them. In this connection mention should be made of Maj. Robert Wheat of the La. battalion, known as The Tigers. As a boy, Wheat hWheat had run away from home in Baltimore and served gallantly in the Mexican War, and, after that, in desperate fighting with Walker in Nicaragua. In his report Evans writes that he was much indebted to Major Wheat for his great experience and his excellent advice. He doubtless advised
nd pressed by the determined valor with which Wheat handled Adjutant Owen, of the Washington artillery, lying on the grass near by heard these words to report them. his battalion until he was desperately wounded, Though badly beaten Maj. Robert Wheat left his mark on the memories of the beaten army. In Washington, on the morning of the 22d, the soldiers explained the rout by gasping—D—n those Louisiana Tigers—born devils, every one of them! hastened up three other regiments of the brighe story of the Louisiana troops on the field of Bull Run will not find it hard to cry with General Beauregard: Three cheers for Louisiana. The loss of the Louisiana commands participating in the battle of Manassas, July 21st, was as follows: Wheat's battalion, killed 8; wounded, officers 5, men 33, missing, 2; total, 48, Seventh regiment, killed 3, wounded 23, total, 26. Washington artillery, killed x, wounded 5. Our battleflag springs from the field of the First Manassas. The strikin<
mposed of the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth (Colonel Stafford) regiments and Wheat's battalion, with Bowyer's 4-gun battery (Virginian) into the valley with Ewellannihilating it. The first attack was made by Bradley Johnson's Marylanders and Wheat's battalion with the remainder of Taylor's brigade supporting. The Federals then taking a stronger position, Wheat charged again in the front, while the Sixth sought their flank. The enemy fled across the river. Two bridges spanned the deep mery, Randolph and Wren wounded; in the Ninth Lieutenant Meizell killed; and in Wheat's battalion Lieutenants Cockroft, Coyle, McCarthy, Putnam and Ripley wounded. ed at Centerville in 1861, with the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth Louisiana, Wheat's battalion closing the list. Its first commander, General Walker, was killed or, he was shot from his horse and died in a few minutes. Here also fell Maj. Robert Wheat, known familiarly as Bob Wheat, cheeriest of souls, and not a stranger to
his paper: To the Editors of the Dispatch: The gallant Colonel Wheat is not dead, as was reported yesterday, but strong hopes are ent. George McCausland, Aid to General Evans, written on behalf of Major Wheat to a relative of Lt. Allen C. Dickinson, Adjutant of Wheat's BatWheat's Battalion. For the information of the family and friends of Lieut. Dickinson, I extract a portion of the letter, viz! "He (Major Wheat,) dMajor Wheat,) deeply regrets to say that our dear friend (Lieut. D) was so unfortunate as to receive a wound, which, slight as it is, will prevent him, for ecessary to say a word, when a man so well noted for chivalry as Robert Wheat has said that he appreciated the gallantry of his Adjutant. Liety of Mr. Waggoner and family, on Clay street, in this city. Maj. Wheat's battalion fought on the extreme left, where the battle raged hof two-thirds of the company. Such was the dauntless bravery of Wheat's battalion, and such is the heroism of the Confederate army.
illed and between 40 and 50 wounded. There was no officer, except Col. Fisher, that was killed. The names of the killed and wounded were not obtained. Maj. Wheat's special Battalion, from Louisiana. Lieut. Dickinson, of New Orleans, now in this city, and who was shot in the thigh with a Minnie ball, in the battle on Sunday, say that he was a member of Major Wheat's battalion, and out of 400 which constituted that command, there were not more than 100 that escaped death and wounds. Major Wheat was shot through the body, and was surviving on Wednesday, although his case is exceedingly critical. Lieut. Dickinson also says that the CatahowiaMajor Wheat was shot through the body, and was surviving on Wednesday, although his case is exceedingly critical. Lieut. Dickinson also says that the Catahowia (La.) Guerillas, Capt. Behoup, fought with desperation, and he thinks his command was nearly all killed and wounded. The Captain, although for a long time in the hottest of the fight, escaped unhurt. He also says the Tiger Rifles, of La., in a perfect shower of bullets, bombs and bails, threw down their rifles and charged up
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