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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
he invitation to the slaves to rise against their masters, the suggested insurrection, caused, says Bancroft, a thrill of indignation to run through Virginia, effacing all differences of party, and rousing one strong, impassioned purpose to drive away the insolent power by which it had been put forth. A cotemporary annalist, adverting to the same proclamation, said, it was received with the greatest horror in all the colonies. The policy adopted by Dunmore, says Lawrence in his notes on Wheaton, of arming the slaves against their masters, was not pursued during the war of the revolution; and when negroes were taken by the English, they were not considered otherwise than as property and plunder. Emancipation of slaves as a war measure has been severely condemned and denounced by the most eminent publicists in Europe and the United States. The United States, in their diplomatic relations, have ever maintained, says the northern authority just quoted, that slaves were private prope
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
in the valley of the Shenandoah with Sheridan in his rallying ride, and in the last campaign storming the works of Petersburg-losing eleven hundred men in fifteen minutes; masters at Sailor's Creek, four days after, taking six thousand prisoners, with Ewell and five of his best generals,--of them the redoubtable Kershaw; in the van in the pursuit of Lee, and with the Second Corps pressing him to a last stand, out of which came the first message of surrender. First comes the division of Wheaton; at its head, under Penrose, the heroic New Jersey Brigade which at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania lost a thousand one hundred and forty-three officers and men. Next, and out of like experiences, the brigades of Edwards and Hamblen, representing the valor of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Now passes Getty's Division. Leading is Warner's Brigade, from its great record of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and Cold Harbor; then the magnificent First
me right was held by a very much reduced force. This was taken advantage of by the enemy, who, during the absence of Geary's division of the Twelfth corps, advanced and occupied part of the line. On the morning of the third July, General Geary having returned during the night, attacked at early dawn the enemy and succeeded in driving him back and reoccupying his former position. A spirited contest was maintained all the morning along this part of the line. General Geary, reenforced by Wheaton's brigade of the Sixth corps, maintained his position and inflicted very severe losses on the enemy. With this exception, our lines remained undisturbed till one P. M. on the third, when the enemy opened from over one hundred and twenty-five guns, playing upon our centre and left. This cannonade continued for over two hours, when, our guns failing to make any reply, the enemy ceased firing, and soon his masses of infantry become visible, forming for an assault on our left and left centr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
of the British Government, discussed the subject in the light in which the President had viewed it from the beginning. He corrected the misrepresentations of Captain Williams as to the facts of the capture, declaring that Captain Wilkes was not acting under instructions from his Government, but only upon his own suggestions of duty; Captain Wilkes said in a Second dispatch to the Secretary of the Navy, that he carefully examined all the authorities on international law at hand — Kent, Wheaton, Vattel, and the decisions of British judges in the admiralty courts — which bore upon the rights and responsibilities of neutrals. Knowing that the Governments of great Britain, France, Spain, and Portugal had acknowledged the Confederates as belligerents, and that the ports of these powers were open to their vessels, and aid and protection were given them, he believed that the Trent, bearing agents of that so-called belligerent, came under the operations of the law of the right of search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mason's manners. (search)
andolph, of Roanoke, (clarum et venerable nomen!) the impropriety of approaching in a pair of buckskin breeches the enthroned Majesty of Muscovy? or of falling before Royalty upon his knees? For performing these two feats, the Lord of Roanoke drew eighteen thousand dollars from the treasury of his country, and did that country no conceivable service whatever. Might not a little previous study have saved Minister Hannegan from devoting himself more to Bacchus than to Vatel, Puffendorf and Wheaton, and from being kicked out of the principal taverns near the court to which he was accredited? Might not such a volume have saved James Buchanan (with due reverence his name is here mentioned) from the gross impropriety of the Ostend Conference? Might not such a volume have persuaded a certain Secretary of Legation not to desecrate the sacred seal of Columbia? Might it not have wheedled and coaxed another Secretary of Legation into paying his debts before leaving Paris, so that shopmen w
y tributary of the Appomattox — where, Crook and Devin coming promptly to his support, he pierced the Rebel line of march, destroying 400 wagons and taking 16 guns, with many prisoners. Ewell's corps, following the train, was thus cut off from Lee. Its advance was now gallantly charged by Col. Stagg's brigade; and thus time was gained for the arrival of the leading division (Seymour's) of the 6th (Wright's) corps, pursuing the Confederate rear; when Ewell recoiled, fighting stoutly, till Wheaton's division also came up, and, a part of our infantry, advancing, were momentarily repelled by a deadly fire. But the odds were too great: Ewell's veterans — inclosed between our cavalry and the 6th corps, and sternly charged by the latter, without a chance of escape — threw down their arms and surrendered. Ewell him-self and four other Generals were among the prisoners, of whom over 6,000 were taken this day. Ere this, Ord, reaching out from Jetersville farther west, had struck the hea<
ason, Slidell, Eustis, and McFarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making them prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at the Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz.: Kent, Wheaton, and Vattel, beside various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the admiralty court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France, and Spain, having issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and knowing that the ports of Great Britain, France, Spain, and Holland in the West Indies, were open to their vessels, and that they were admit
rded me, or to take my position without the distance of a marine league from shore. At the same time, that, while anchor weigh it was contrary to the police regulations of the port to communicate with the shore. I consequently decided upon anchoring, which I had no sooner done than the French commander paid me a visit, offered me every civility and attention, saying that he did not doubt that all international law would be respected by me; and in the course of conversation, quoting from Wheaton, reminded me that one belligerent could not depart until twenty-four hours after the other. I instantly got under weigh, with him on board, fearing that the Sumter should do so before me, as her steam was up. I have now accepted the alternative, and established myself at the mouth of the harbor, without the marine league, with much anxiety, lest during the darkness of the night, under cover of the high land, the Sumter should be able to get off without my being aware of it. The major
e invitation to the slaves to rise against their masters, the suggested insurrection, caused, says Bancroft, a thrill of indignation to run through Virginia, effacing all differences of party, and rousing one strong, impassioned purpose to drive away the insolent power by which it had been put forth. A contemporary annalist, adverting to the same proclamation, said: It was received with the greatest horror in all the colonies. The policy adopted by Dunmore, says Lawrence in his notes on Wheaton, of arming the slaves against their masters, was not pursued during the war of the Revolution; and when negoes were taken by the English, they were not considered otherwise than as property and plunder. Emancipation of slaves as a war measure has been severely condemned and denounced by the, most eminent publicists in Europe and the United States. The United States, in their diplomatic relations, have ever maintained, says the Northern authority just quoted, that slaves were private pro
er such exposed passages. Most of the troops left for the defense of the city were on the Virginia side. Therefore Early wisely picked out the northern outposts as the more vulnerable. Long Bridge was closely guarded at all times, like Chain Bridge and the other approaches, and at night the planks of its floor were removed. Entrance to Washington from the South--the famous chain bridge Long bridge and the capitol across the broad Potomac the afternoon General Wright sent out General Wheaton with Bidwell's brigade of Getty's division, and Early's pickets and skirmishers were driven back a mile. This small engagement had many distinguished spectators. Pond in The Shenandoah Valley thus describes the scene: On the parapet of Fort Stevens stood the tall form of Abraham Lincoln by the side of General Wright, who in vain warned the eager President that his position was swept by the bullets of sharpshooters, until an officer was shot down within three feet of him, when he rel
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