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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 1 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 7 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 13 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Frank Wheaton or search for Frank Wheaton in all documents.

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dwards. (2) Colonel Isaac C. Bassett. Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, Lieutenant-Colonel George L. Montague. Forty-ninth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Baynton J. Hickman. Eighty-second Pennsylvania, Colonel Isaac C. Bassett. One Hundred and Nineteenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Gideon Clark. Second Rhode Island (battalion), Captain Elisha H. Rhodes. Fifth Wisconsin (battalion), Major Charles W. Kempf. Second division: Brigadier-General George W. Getty. first brigade: Brigadier-General Frank Wheaton. Sixty-second New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Theo. B. Hamilton. Ninety-third Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John S. Long. Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John B. Kohler. One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania, Major James H. Coleman. One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Pennsylvania, Major Robert Mullroe. Second brigade: Colonel James M. Warner. Lieutenant-Colonel Amasa S. Tracy. Superintended a portion of the line. Second Vermont, Major Enoch E. Johnson. Third and Fou
ral George W. Getty. (3) Major-General Horatio G. Wright. escort. First Michigan Cavalry, Company G, Lieutenant William H. Wheeler. first division. Brigadier-General Frank Wheaton. first brigade: (1) Colonel William H. Penrose. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Edward L. Campbell. (3) Captain Baldwin Hufty. Fourth New Jersey, Captain Bald. When nearing the Valley pike, just south of Newtown I saw about three-fourths of a mile west of the pike a body of troops, which proved to be Ricketts's and Wheaton's divisions of the Sixth Corps, and then learned that the Nineteenth Corps had halted a little to the right and rear of these; but I did not stop, desiring to getback to the right flank, and returning to the place where my headquarters had been established I met near them Ricketts's division under General Keifer and General Frank Wheaton's division, both marching to the front. When the men of these divisions saw me they began cheering and took up the double quick to the front, while I tur
e enemy was posted, so as Seymour's division arrived I directed General Wright to put it on the right of the road, while Wheaton's men, coming up all hot and out of breath, promptly formed on Seymour's left. Both divisions thus aligned faced southwat if we delayed longer the enemy might effect his escape toward Farmville — the general attack was begun. Seymour and Wheaton, moving forward together, assailed the enemy's front and left, and Stagg's brigade, too, which in the mean time had been placed between Wheaton's left and Devin's right, went at him along with them, Merritt and Crook resuming the fight from their positions in front of Anderson. The enemy, seeing little chance of escape, fought like a tiger at bay, but both Seymour and Wheaton pressed him vigorously, gaining ground at all points except just to the right of the road, where Seymour's left was checked. Here the confederates burst back on us in a countercharge, surging down almost to the creek, but the artillery,