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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 1 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 7 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 13 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Frank Wheaton or search for Frank Wheaton in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
the same mind and asked Meade: Who is this General Gregg? You ought to arrest him! Meade said: It's Griffin, not Gregg; and it's only his way of talking. Meantime we got word that the head of Hancock's column had moved up the Brock road and made a junction with Getty. At 3.15 I was sent with an order to General Getty to attack at once, and to explain to him that Hancock would join also. He is a cool man, is Getty, quite a wonder; as I saw then and after. Go to General Eustis and General Wheaton, he said to his aides, and tell them to prepare to advance at once. And so we were getting into it! And everybody had been ordered up, including Burnside, who had crossed that very morning at Germanna Ford. General Grant had his station with us (or we with him); there he took his seat on the grass, and smoked his briarwood pipe, looking sleepy and stern and indifferent. His face, however, may wear a most pleasing smile, and I believe he is a thoroughly amiable man. That he believes
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
he railroad. Here come the two divisions, therefore, or whatever they are. Stop the advance, orders General Wright. General Wheaton, strengthen that skirmish line and tell them to hold on. The remainder of Wheaton's division is formed on the flankWheaton's division is formed on the flank, and begins making a breastwork; more troops are sent for. The fire of the skirmishers now draws nearer and gets distinct; but, when the reinforcement arrives, they make a stout stand, and hold them. . . . All the while the telegraph is going: Don'e not, they were moving along our rear. What do you mean by that? There is Russell, and there is Ricketts, and here is Wheaton; now of course that's your front. Russell isn't in such a position, sir, nor Wheaton either. They face so (dabs with aWheaton either. They face so (dabs with a pencil), so that is our rear and can't be anything else. Whereupon the good chief graciously said no more. I do not know that he ever said anything pleasant about me except the day after the Wilderness battles, when I heard Hancock say that Colon
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
ain. A week ago Sunday night the first division came from City Point on the cars, having come straight from the neighborhood of Winchester by car and boat. The next morning we were treated to the sight of the familiar red crosses, and soon General Wheaton rode up, to see the General and report. . . .Very loath were the Sixth Corps bucks to leave the valley (where they had plenty of sheep and chickens and victories, and no fighting except in the regular battles), and come to a place with whichinto the deserted camps, and observed the aspect of grim satisfaction with which the new comers went about, looking into the abandoned huts. The luxurious Crawford had his nice log cabin taken down and carted to his new locality. However, said Wheaton, I slept in Crawford's kitchen, and that was good enough for me. On Tuesday came the 3d division, also with a new commander, for brave General Ricketts lies at Washington, still suffering from his wound; and General Seymour, he who was taken th
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
re not half enough for a great army and its waggon trains, and yet we took nothing on wheels but the absolute essentials for three or four days. We were up at four o'clock, to be ready for an early start; all the roads were well blocked with waggons toiling slowly towards the front. Riding ahead, we came upon General Wright, halted near a place called Mt. Pleasant Church. The bands were playing and the troops were cheering for the fall of Richmond, which, as the jocose Barnard (Captain on Wheaton's Staff) said, Would knock gold, so that it wouldn't be worth more than seventy-five cents on the dollar! Suddenly we heard renewed cheers, while the band played Hail to the Chief. We looked up the road, and, seeing a body of cavalry, supposed the Lieutenant-General was coming. But lo! as they drew nearer, we recognized the features of Colonel Mike Walsh (erst a sergeant of cavalry), who, with an admirable Irish impudence, was acknowledging the shouts of the crowd that mistook him for G
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
, 110n; search for, 146; feeling, 147; before Petersburg, 168, 217, 221, 233, 234, 251, 294, 297; narrow escape, 219; stragglers, 292; relieved of command, 333. Washburn, Elihu Benjamin, 318, 319. Washburn, Francis, 353. Washington, D. C., Harvard Club, i; in 1863, 4. Waste in the war, 207. Way, a covered, 203. Webb, Alexander Stewart, 42, 45, 59, 94, 807, 313, 317, 345, 356; described, 307. Weld, Stephen Minot, Jr., 128, 211. Weldon railroad, 217, 224, 226, 23, 294. Wheaton, Frank, 91, 299; before Petersburg, 175, 177. White, Julius, 219. Wilcox's wharf, 163. Wilderness, the, 53, 89; battle of, 98. Wilkinson, Morton Smith, 75. Willcox, Orlando Bolivar, 212, 234, 310. Williams, Seth, 23, 60, 110, 123, 171, 221, 258, 270; on Sunday work, 28; brevet denied, 289; messenger to Lee, 354. Williams house, 173, 189. Wilson, James Harrison, 82, 104, 136, 156. Wingate, —, 357. Winthrop, Frederick, 800. Wise, Henry Alexander, 162, 361. Women in camp, 64, 6