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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 70 0 Browse Search
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approached, as the pulp becomes finer in the progress of the work. Coleman's amalgamator. Wheeler's amalgamating pan. Wheeler, December 8, 1863. The lower face of the rotary-muller has spiWheeler, December 8, 1863. The lower face of the rotary-muller has spirally curved grooves which act in apposition to reversedly curved spiral grooves on the bed-plate or stationary muller. Fig. 148 is a vertical section, and Fig. 149 shows the pan in perspective, the int. The pan has a double bottom, and is heated by steam admitted to the space thus formed. Wheeler's amalgamator. Wheeler's separator. Wheeler, July 14, 1863. This machine is constructed Wheeler's separator. Wheeler, July 14, 1863. This machine is constructed for saving the mercury from the pulp or waste matter which escapes from the ordinary amalgamators, and consists of a tub with concave bottom and a central depression, in which is a vertical tubular rWheeler, July 14, 1863. This machine is constructed for saving the mercury from the pulp or waste matter which escapes from the ordinary amalgamators, and consists of a tub with concave bottom and a central depression, in which is a vertical tubular rotary-shaft having arms on which pads are placed, which rub on the bottom and collect the particles of mercury which run down into the central chamber; water is supplied through the hollow shaft, whic
rownMar. 4, 1862. 43,284F. BealsJune 28, 1864. *45,638R. RobertsDec. 27, 1864. 46,207F. BealsFeb. 7, 1865. *46,286H. F. WheelerFeb. 7, 1865. 51,837B. F. JoslynJan. 2, 1866. 52,258F. BealsJan. 30, 1866. 58,525D. WilliamsonOct. 2, 1866. 65,704R. E. StephensJune 11, 1867. *66,110H. F. WheelerJune 25, 1867. 66,913Thrasher and AikenJuly 16, 1867. 70,264S. S. RembertOct. 29, 1867. 71,349E. WhitneyNov. 26, 1867. 76,734C. H. AlsopApr. 7, 1868. 82,908D. WernerOct. 6, 1868. *87,038W. Gard64. 44,868W. JohnstonNov. 1, 1864. *45,361L. TriplettDec. 6, 1864. 49,057M. L. M. DescouturesJuly 25, 1865. 50,760H. F. WheelerOct. 31, 1865. 55,752H. F. WheelerJune 19, 1866. 58,064W. J. ChristySept. 18, 1866. 73,494Boyd and TylerJan. 21, 18H. F. WheelerJune 19, 1866. 58,064W. J. ChristySept. 18, 1866. 73,494Boyd and TylerJan. 21, 1868. 88,540Boyd and TylerApr. 6, 1869. 103,694F. WessonMay 31, 1870. 106,083Simpson, Gray, and RomansAug. 2, 1870. 112,803Gray and RomansMar. 21, 1871. class B. — breech-block moving with relation to barrel. 1. Sliding Longitudinally Back
Sulphate of baryta and albumen rolled into sheets. Billiard-balls made of a mixture of paper pulp, sulphate of baryta, and gelatine, are said to be equal to those made of ivory. Plaster of paris saturated with melted spermaceti. The following United States patents bear upon this subject; the figures are day, month, year: — Welling4, 8, 1857.Seeley23, 6, 1868. Held4, 8, 1857.Welling5, 5, 1868. Hackert31, 5, 1864.Cradenwitz25, 5, 1869. Dupper1865.Hyatt and Blake4, 5, 1869. Wheeler14, 11, 1865.Welling20, 4, 1869. Wurtz1, 1, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Hackert19, 2, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Starr3, 3, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Starr and Welling9, 6, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pas
that the patent is a quid pro quo, an exclusive right in return for an invention adequately described on record. 1838 Wheeler had a machine with a revolving endless apron to deposit grain in a box with a sliding bottom, by which it was deposited ed edge may slide freely over the catch, without requiring the knob to be turned in order to close the door. Mallory, Wheeler, & Co.'s reversible lock. In Mallory, Wheeler, & Co.'s lock (Fig. 4287), this is effected by simply pulling the boltWheeler, & Co.'s lock (Fig. 4287), this is effected by simply pulling the bolt forward until it clears the notch in the rim, and turning it half round. Re-vers′i-ble mouth-bit. (Menage.) A bit having a rule joint; when in one position it works the same as the Pelham, while, if reversed, it becomes a stiff-mouth bit. zer, 1862. Pitch, 1; quicklime, 2; Ven. red ocher, 2; linseed-oil, 0.5. Fuller, 1863. Saturated sheets of paper. Wheeler, 1866. Coal-tar, 20 gallons; linseed-oil, 2 gallons; shellac, 10 pounds; rosin, 4 pounds. Stead, 1866. Paint-skins,
loose disk-bobbin b on the face of the hook. Wheeler and Wilson pattern. Leather-sewing Machinely 13, 1858. 21,089SmithAug. 3, 1858. 21,100Wheeler et al.Aug. 3, 1858. 21,129GibbsAug. 10, 1858July 26, 1870. 2. By revolving Hooks. (a.) Wheeler & Wilson Pattern. 8,296WilsonAug. 12, 1851. 19, 1858. 21,398RogersAug. 31, 1858. 22,045WheelerNov. 9, 1858. 24,000BartholfMay 17, 1859. 2621, 1872. 127,244JunettMay 28, 1872. 128,833WheelerJuly 9, 1872. 130,072ReedJuly 30, 1872. 131,s of a pin projecting from the needle-bar. Wheeler and Wilson sewing-machine. Wheeler and WilsWheeler and Wilson hook. The Wheeler and Wilson sewing-machine (Fig. 4861) makes a lock-stitch by means of a cchines. The Singer Manufacturing Co.241,679 Wheeler and Wilson Manufacturing Co.92,827 Howe Sewifts, and are held in place by a sleeve. j. Wheeler. A ball on one shaft enters a socket on the tion of hub and rim are made removable. In Wheeler's (C, Fig. 4900), one or more of the arms of [6 more...]
in B (Fig. 6170), which is placed within the bobbin-case, and they are held in the cavity of the hook k by the ring-slide, the thread being drawn out in front. Wheeler and Wilson's Tailoring-machine. In operating, the needle descends and thrusts a bight of the upper thread through the material, and then, rising to clear the the forked bar down upon the cloth and it upon the spurs beneath. See tuck-marker. See also Fig. 4875, page 2121. The early patents were Singer, 1856; Arnold, Wheeler, and Fuller, 1860. Tuck-fold′er. For folding over a tuck in advance of sewing on the machine. Goodrich's are made in sets; six in a set, adapted to various arranging the tucks in groups, the spaces between being twice the width of a tuck. Jones's chart and scale for tuck-markers; patent dated August 11, 1874. Wheeler and Wilson's tuck-marker. Fig. 6763 shows a tuck-marker as adapted to the old Wheeler and Wilson machine. Insert the loose end of the connection d into the t
v. 8, 1870. 112,606.Lewis, March 14, 1871. 112,607.Lewis, March 14, 1871. 112,608.Lewis, March 14, 1871. 113,014.Brumlen, Mar. 28, 1871. 114,405.Burridge, May 2, 1871. 116,604.Lewis, July 4, 1871. 118,794.Davison, Sept. 12, 1871. 120,556.Wheeler, Oct. 31, 1871. 120,916.Wadsworth, Nov. 14, 1871. 122,404.Pollock, Jan. 3, 1872. 125,153.Whiting, April 2, 1872. 127,395.Wheeler, May 28, 1872. 136,446.Meylert, Mar. 4, 1873. 137,474.Osgood, April 1, 1873. 140,721.Milner, July 8, 1873. 1Wheeler, May 28, 1872. 136,446.Meylert, Mar. 4, 1873. 137,474.Osgood, April 1, 1873. 140,721.Milner, July 8, 1873. 142,199.Boehne, Aug. 26, 1873. 142,419.Tolle, Sept. 2, 1873. 145,713.Armstrong, Dec. 23, 1873. 148,862.Tuttle et al., Mar. 24, 1874. 151,165.Sevin, May 19, 1874. 151,497.Meylert, June 2, 1874. 151,799.Rueger, June 9, 1874. 154,643.Brumlen, Sept 1, 1874. 155,539.Morse, Sept. 29, 1874. White-lead mill. A mill for grinding whitelead, either in a dry or moist condition. White-lead mill. Fig. 7209 illustrates an apparatus invented by Mm. Hameline and Besancon, in which the prod