Your search returned 137 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
oseph Wheeler, C. S. A. Commander of Confederate forces in more than a hundred cavalry battles, General Wheeler well deserved the tribute of his erstwhile opponent, General Sherman, who once said: In the event of war with a foreign country, Joe Wheeler is the man to command the cavalry of our army. He was born in 1836, and graduated at West Point in 1859. He served in the regular army until April, 1861, then entered the Confederate service. He commanded a brigade of infantry at Shiloh in transferred to the cavalry. He fought under Bragg in Kentucky at Perryville and in other engagements, and covered the retreat of Bragg's army to the southward. In January, 1863, he was commissioned major-general. In the Chattanooga campaigns Wheeler showed himself a brave and skilful officer. He harassed Sherman's flank during the march to Atlanta, and in August, 1864, led a successful raid in Sherman's rear as far north as the Kentucky line. In February, 1865, he was commissioned lieuten
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
tle of Murfreesboro, making the following general remarks about it: General Bragg's army, infantry and artillery, numbered 33,475. His cavalry, under Wharton, Wheeler and Pegram, aggregated 4,237, making his army, of all arms, 37,712. Wheeler's brigade reported on December 31st, 1, 169, and was not in the battle, but was operaWheeler's brigade reported on December 31st, 1, 169, and was not in the battle, but was operating on Rosecrans' immediate communications. Pegram and Buford, with five regiments, 118 strong, were on the extreme right and scarcely engaged. Hanson's brigade, of Breckinridge's division, 1,893 strong, was east of the river. Deducting Wheeler's and Hanson's brigades from Bragg's total, that general fought in actual battle agaWheeler's and Hanson's brigades from Bragg's total, that general fought in actual battle against Rosecrans' columns a force of 34,650, of all arms. These figures are taken from the field returns of the army, as they are given from the originals in the War Records of the Union and Confederate armies. It is interesting to note General Rosecrans' estimates of General Bragg's forces and losses. He reported to Washington
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
5 batteries. Total of wing, 6 divisions, 17 brigades, 17 batteries. Total in both wings, 11 divisions, 33 brigades, 33 batteries. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Wheeler, operating on Bragg's left: Wharton's division, 2 brigades, 1 battery; Martin's division, 2 brigades, 1 battery. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Forrestrigades, as reported, was the same in both armies. Bragg had more cavalry in the field than Rosecrans, but in the battle of Chickamauga, on his immediate flanks, Wheeler had not more than 2,000 and Forrest about the same number. It is always difficult to estimate the strength of armies by counting their divisions, brigades or rek and his left to Lieutenant-General Longstreet; the latter did not arrive until II p. m. on the 19th. Forrest was well out on the right, in front of McDonald's; Wheeler on the left, at Lee & Gordon's mills and beyond. Polk's command was arranged from right to left, as follows: Breckinridge, Cleburne, with Walker behind the forme
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
th and west of the city, and steadily pushed southwestward. On August 25th, Hood's line, west and south of Atlanta, had extended to cover East Point, on the Macon railroad, 5 miles distant from the city. Early in August General Hood sent General Wheeler with half his cavalry force to operate on Sherman's railroad communications with Chattanooga. Satisfied of his ability to hold Atlanta and keep open his Macon communications, he was equally well satisfied that Wheeler's success would compelWheeler's success would compel Sherman to assault or raise the siege and recross the Chattahoochee. But Sherman had already determined to raise the siege, to intrench one of his corps on the Chattahoochee to guard his supplies and protect that crossing, and to throw the Federal army first on the West Point and then on the Macon road, south of Atlanta. After an ineffective cavalry expedition, Sherman's movement began on the night of the 25th, and by the morning of the 28th nearly his whole army was in position on the West
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
otaligo, including the cavalry command of General Wheeler at Hardeeville, and the forces at Honey halpole; Wilkins' cavalry company reserves. Wheeler's cavalry corps included the brigades of Andeves under Generals Smith and Browne, 1,450. Wheeler's cavalry, 6,700. Army of Tennessee: Lee's cole Hardee should fall back on Charleston, and Wheeler on Columbia. Lee's corps was ordered to Brane was quite sharp and lasted several hours. Wheeler, following McLaws' retreat, burned the bridged Kilpatrick, Augusta. The latter was met by Wheeler's cavalry in battle at Blackville, Williston ers, to Augusta, in the vicinity of which General Wheeler had his cavalry, and General Hampton urgemers, who often fell to the tender mercies of Wheeler's cavalry, and were never heard of again, meee, supported by McLaws' division and later by Wheeler's cavalry, the fighting was continued, althou21st, General Hardee, assisted by Hampton and Wheeler, defeated an attempt of Blair's corps to move[3 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
n distinct and determined assaults by the largely superior forces under Sheridan, his command occupying the most important point of the Confederate line and fighting as infantry. In September he was promoted major-general, and in the spring of 1865 he was detached with a small division for the campaign against Sherman in the Carolinas. He commanded the rear guard of Hardee's army at the evacuation of Columbia and Cheraw, and at the last had division command of cavalry, his forces and Gen. Joe Wheeler's forming the command of Lieut.-Gen. Wade Hampton. The close of the war left him in financial ruin, but he bravely met the exigencies of the occasion, and in a short time attained national repute for the firmness and boldness with which he handled the political questions which concerned the essentials of the reorganized social life. While he powerfully advocated obedience to the reconstruction measures as the law, law being preferable to chaos, he receded at no time from a persistent
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
osition in May, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, Fifty-first Alabama regiment, Col. John T. Morgan, Martin's brigade and Wheeler's corps of cavalry, and was elected second lieutenant. He served with credit until he was captured at Murfreesboro, Ten his release was again made prisoner in South Carolina and held until the close of the war. George A. became a member of Wheeler's cavalry in the latter part of the struggle and served to the end. Dr.. Bissell was born in Dallas county, Ala., in 1til the close of the war, when he settled in Cartersville, Ga., where he now resides; John B. served as a private in Gen. Joe Wheeler's cavalry throughout the war and now resides in Jefferson county, Ala; Ambrose J. was a sergeant in Company D, Hampthe served in the department of East Tennessee, but from the battle of Chickamauga to the end his command belonged to Gen. Joe Wheeler's cavalry. He therefore served under that gallant leader from the fall of 1863 to the close of the war, taking part
at Perryville, on October 7th, observed the enemy massing against him. On the 7th, Liddell's Arkansas brigade was in advance of Hardee, supporting the cavalry of Wheeler, who was drawing the shells of the enemy, many of which fell in Liddell's lines. The Seventh Arkansas, under Lieut.-Col. Peter Snyder, held a woodland in front. Wheeler was forced back that night, and next day the battle of Perryville was opened by the Federals with an attack driving in Liddell's skirmishers. Colonel Gillespie, of the Seventh, was ordered to regain the woods, and the Fifth, Col. L. Featherston, Lieut.-Col. John E. Murray and Maj. P. V. Green, went to Gillespie's assistanof artillery and about 300 prisoners, and inflicted a great loss in killed and wounded. Then followed Bragg's memorable retreat out of Kentucky, covered by Gen. Joe Wheeler, who, in protecting the retiring army, encountered the pursuing enemy twenty times. The Confederate army did not get out of the State too soon, for the wet
1) Under Col. John T. Cox, Wharton's brigade, Wheeler's cavalry, December, 1862. (773) Hardee's re51—(19) Russell's brigade, Martin's division, Wheeler's corps, Chickamauga campaign, September, 186o. 58—(590) Hume's brigade, Kelly's division, Wheeler's cavalry corps, January, 1864. No. 73—(81 served during the greater part of the war in Wheeler's cavalry, and fought throughout the campaign 960) Harrison's brigade, Wharton's division, Wheeler's corps, July. No. 50—(232) Harrison's br—(19) Harrison's brigade, Wharton's division, Wheeler's corps, Chickamauga campaign, September, 1863. (520) General Wheeler's report says Estes' regiment was picketing Tennessee river from Bridgepo864. (590) Hume's brigade, Kelly's division, Wheeler's cavalry corps, January 20th. No. 73—(819 in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. It was with Wheeler in his last raid into Tennessee, then moved i, May 9th. Vol. XVI, Part 1—(898, 899) General Wheeler mentions engagement on Perryville pike, O
being present in the affairs at Munfordville and at Salt river. In that campaign the brigade, under Gen. Franklin Gardner, included the Alabama regiments of Cols. Joe Wheeler, J. Q. Loomis, J. G. Coltart, H. D. Clayton, besides his own. It fought under Loomis and Coltart at Murfreesboro, after which Deas, promoted to brigadier-genifth cavalry, Hannon's Fifty-third, his own regiment, under Colonel Johnson, Capt. W. R. Julian's troop, and Ferrell's battery. In October he cooperated with General Wheeler in the raid into Tennessee against Rosecrans' communications. Early in 1864 he was in battle at Athens, near Florence, and at Lebanon, and in the latter part. He soon after became major of the Fourth (July 17, 1861), and on the 12th of October, 1861, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Nineteenth Alabama, Col. Joe Wheeler's regiment. In the great battle of Shiloh, so full of glorious memories to the soldiers of the South, and yet so disappointing in its results, he led the Ni
1 2