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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 63 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ace, General Sherman, after securing his line of communications across the Chattahoochee, moved his main force round by the enemy's left flank upon the Montgomery and Macon roads, to draw the enemy from his fortifications. In this he succeeded, and after defeating the enemy near Rough and Ready, Jonesborough, and Lovejoy's, forcing him to retreat to the south, on the 2d of September occupied Atlanta, the objective point of his campaign. About the time of this move the rebel cavalry, under Wheeler, attempted to cut his communications in the rear, but was repulsed at Dalton and driven into East Tennessee, whehce it proceeded west to McMinnville, Murfreesborough, and Franklin, and was finally driven south of the Tennessee. The damage done by this raid was repaired in a few days. During the partial investment of Atlanta, General Rousseau joined General Sherman with a force of cavalry from Decatur, having made a successful raid upon the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad and its branches
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 10-Sept. 9, 1864.Wheeler's raid to North Georgia and East Tennessee, with combats at Dalton (August 14-15) and other points. Aug. 15, 1864.Skirmishes at Sandtown and Fairburn. Aug. 18-22, 1864.Kilpatrick's raid from Sandtown to Lovejoy's Station, with combats at Camp Creek (18th), Red Oak (19th), Flint River (19th), Jonesborough (19th), and Lovejoy's Station (20th). Aug. 22, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 26-Sept. 4, 1864.Operations at t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
nty-third Illinois Infantry. No. 38Capt. Thomas J. Bryan, Seventy-fourth Illinois Infantry. No. 39Lieut. Col. George W. Smith, Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry. No. 40Col. Bernard Laiboldt, Second Missouri Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). No. 41Col. Joseph Conrad, Fifteenth Missouri Infantry. No. 42Maj. Arthur MacArthur, jr., Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Infantry. No. 43Brig. Gen. George D. Wagner, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade. No. 44Lieut. Col. Willis Blanch, Fintry, of operations May 7-July 5 and August 16-September 5. No. 118Maj. Joseph Fisher, Seventy-fourth Ohio Infantry, of operations July 5-August 15. No. 119Col. William Sirwell, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). No. 120Maj. Michael H. Locher, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry. No. 121Col. Henry A. Hambright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations May 24. No. 122Lieut. Col. George B. Bingham, First Wisconsin Infantry. No. 123Bv
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
enemy lay in and about Dalton, superior to me in cavalry (Wheeler's), and with three corps of infantry and artillery, viz : n, of the Confederate Army. I estimated the cavalry under Wheeler at about 10,000, and the infantry and artillery about 45,0. m. had almost given up the attempt. In the mean time Wheeler's cavalry, unopposed (for General Garrard was absent at Co manner. I estimated this joint cavalry could whip all of Wheeler's cavalry, and could otherwise accomplish its task, and I bability of success. I consented that after the defeat of Wheeler's cavalry, which was embraced in his orders, and breaking d there until the 29th, skirmishing heavily with a part of Wheeler's cavalry and occupying their attention, but hearing nothihe time of the publication of these orders, I learned that Wheeler, with a large mounted force of the enemy, variously estima I have not yet received full or satisfactory accounts of Wheeler's operations to our rear, further than that he broke the r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
f General Hooker. Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, was left at Burnt Hickory to protect the trains at that point and the rear of the army. McCook's division of cavalry met the enemy's cavalry on the road leading from Burnt Hickory to Marietta near its intersection with the lower Dallas and Allatoona road. McCook's troops skirmished heavily with the force opposing them, inflicting on them considerable loss and capturing 52 prisoners, from whom it was ascertained that the whole of Wheeler's cavalry was posted on the right of the rebel army. The left of General Howard's corps was swung around to the right, occupying a line of hills running nearly perpendicular to the line occupied by Hooker on the 25th, thereby threatening the enemy's right. The Twentythird Army Corps, Major-General Schofield commanding, was posted on the left of my command, Schofield's left extending to and covering the road leading from Allatoona to Dallas, via New Hope Church. There was light skirmishin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 13 (search)
r part in the campaign, both with the 20-pounder Parrotts and 4 1/2-inch guns. The organization of the artillery into brigades under the immediate command of the corps chiefs is, in my opinion, an improvement upon the former organization, and I recommend it be retained. We have lost the valuable services of several officers killed in battle during the campaign, viz: Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery; Capt. S. M. McDowell, Company B, Independent Pennsylvania Artillery; Capt. William Wheeler, Thirteenth New York Battery; First Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres, Sixth Ohio Battery; Second Lieut. F. Henchen, Company I, First New York Artillery. Our loss in guns was four 3-inch Rodmans-two belonging to the Eighteenth Indiana Battery, lost on General McCook's raid, July 30, 1864; two of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, lost on General Kilpatrick's raid, August 20, 1864. I would here take the opportunity to mention the effective service of the batteries serving with the cavalr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
8-left Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., en route for Atlanta, Ga. On the evening of the 4th we reached Catoosa Springs, where we remained until the 7th, on which day we advanced on Tunnel Hill, the First Brigade of the division having the advance; it meeting with opposition near Tunnel Hill, my brigade was detailed to act on the left next to Rocky Face. The Twenty-first Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers, supported by the brigade, formed in two lines. We drove the enemy, composed of Wheeler's cavalry, rapidly before us. The enemy formed on Tunnel Hill, but we continuing to advance, they rapidly retired, leaving us in possession of the works on the hill, which were of good strength, and whence a formidable resistance could have been made. On the 8th took position in front of Rocky Face and remained during the night. On the 9th deployed the Ninety-sixth Illinois and Eighty-fourth Indiana as skirmishers, who boldly advanced up the side of the mountain to the base of the cliff o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 44 (search)
rd Laiboldt, Second Missouri Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). headquarters Post of Dalton, Ga., August 18, 1864. the 14th and 15th days of this month with the raiders under Major-General Wheeler: About 4 p. m. on Sunday, the 14th, a part of Wheeler'sWheeler's force, at the lowest estimate 5,000 strong, surrounded the town of Dalton, and after some picket-firing the following demand for surrender uri Volunteers, Commanding Post. After receiving my answer General Wheeler sent word to me that he would wait sixty seconds for my surren depot and commanding the city, but unprotected by artillery. General Wheeler made forthwith a charge, which was gallantly repulsed, and a lfter, which advanced about 100 yards from the fortifications. General Wheeler again sent a flag of truce, which I refused to accept, having lively, when, at about 5 o'clock in the morning, I saw the head of Wheeler's column move out of town toward Tunnel Hill, and an hour or two a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
twelve miles above Vining's. July 12, 13, and 14, returned to Vining's Station, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire command moved at 5 a. m.; the One hundred and twenty-fifth was deployed as skirmishers, and was supported by the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Ohio, and Third Kentucky Infantry. Encountered Wheeler's cavalry, dismounted, supported by a 4-gun battery. At 9 a. m. at Nancy's Creek charged him from his temporary intrenchments and drove him six miles, bivouacking early in tLe afternoon at Buck Head. Lost during the day 1 man killed and 5 wounded. July 19, remain in bivouac. July 20, marched at 6 a. m., crossed Peach Tree Creek at 12 m. and assisted in repulsing a severe attack of the enemy, which resulted very disastrously to him. July 21, rested in bivouac. July 22, marched at 10 a.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 123 (search)
No. 119. report of Col. William Sirwell, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). Hdqrs. Seventy-Eighth Pennsylvania Vol. Infty., Chattanooga, August 20, 1864. Sir: In obedience to orders [received] from your headquarters Sunday noon, August 14, 1864, I reported my entire commandme to take the advance train and report to Colonel Streight, informing me that the enemy was in strong force at Dalton, Ga., under the command of the rebel Major-General Wheeler. On reaching Chickamauga Station, on Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad, I reported to Colonel Streight. He placed me in command of the Seventy-eighth Regimmands. I cannot particularize as all are equally deserving of praise. I attribute the success of this engagement in defeating and putting to rout the rebel General Wheeler to Major-General Steedman and Colonel Streight, commanding the expedition, and their staff officers for their gentlemanly manner, efficiency in communicating
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