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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 688 376 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 183 7 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 138 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 99 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 93 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 87 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 81 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 73 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 64 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Wheeler or search for Joseph Wheeler in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A morning call on General Kilpatrick. (search)
alized, and the heroism of individuals could not redeem the situation. It only remained to hold what had been gained, but that was the difficulty. If it had not been for overwhelming masses of infantry near at hand Kilpatrick's corps, as an organized body, would have never again existed. Most of our men were dismounted and thrown forward as infantry to hold the ground until the captured horses, artillery and wagons could be removed or destroyed. The programme had been for a portion of Wheeler's command to attack the camp on our right as soon as the firing indicated to them that the ball was opened, but owing to the swampy nature of the ground after the rain, and other reasons not necessary to mention, they unfortunately did not come up in time to answer the purpose intended. At length portions of the scattered Federal cavalry began to take heart and rally under the wing of their infantry, and it became necessary for our command to withdraw before the pressure of the latter. We
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
k's (Virginia) Battery. Reserve Artillery army of Tennessee. Major Felix H. Robertson. Barret's (Missouri) Battery. Le Gardeur's (Louisiana) Battery.( Not mentioned in the reports, but in Reserve Artillery August 31st, and Captain Le Gardeur, &c., relieved from duty in Army of Tennessee November 1st, 1863.) Havis's (Alabama) Battery. Lumsden's (Alabama) Battery. Massenburg's (Georgia) Battery. Cavalry. from return of August 31st, 1863, and reports. Major-General Joseph Wheeler. Wharton's division. Brigadier-General John A. Wharton. First brigade. Colonel C. C. Crews. Seventh Alabama. Second Georgia. Third Georgia. Fourth Georgia, Colonel I. W. Avery. Second brigade. Colonel T. Harrison. Third Confederate, Colonel W. N. Estes. First Kentucky, Lieutenant Colonel J. W. Griffith. Fourth Tennessee, Colonel Paul F. Anderson. Eighth Texas. Eleventh Texas. White's (Georgia) Battery. Martin's division. Brigadier-General W. T. Martin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
untering anything like formidable resistance were well-nigh dissipated. At the outset, the cavalry corps of Major-General Joseph Wheeler, and the Georgia State troops under the command of Major-Generals Howell Cobb and Gustavus W. Smith constitutee Oconee, and Generals Howard and Kilpatrick had massed their troops in and around Gordon. Promptly advised by Major-General Wheeler of the Federal movement, General Beauregard, then in command of the military division of the West, ordered a concntoon trains. Constant and heavy was the skirmishing maintained between the Confederate cavalry, commanded by Major-General Joseph Wheeler, and the Federal cavalry, led by Brigadier-General Judson Kilpatrick. Sometimes affairs of moment transpired ll be specially remembered the encounters near Sandersville, at Waynesboroa, and near Buckhead Creek. My force, says General Wheeler, never exceeded 3,500 men, and was so distributed in front, rear, and on both flanks that I seldom had more than 2,0
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reconstruction in South Carolina. (search)
hould not swerve from my duty to my party. I have been called a liar and a thief by the Democratic press for years. I defy them now and here to prove that I have ever done one single corrupt act or stolen one cent from the people of South Carolina or the United States. If they can prove it, I will resign my commission, for if I am a thief I should not represent you in the Senate of the United States. In conclusion, I repeat that the north will help you, and they will see that Hayes and Wheeler are elected; and if anything happens in South Carolina, you will still have a man on horseback to come to your relief. This precious morsel of eloquence, with the repeated promise of the advent of the man on horseback, coming from a man who certainly appeared to have the ear of the President and Chamberlain, restored harmony to the convention. In the evening a business meeting was held and the next morning the nominees entered the convention—Chamberlain, the designated Governor, and Ell
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Bragg and the Chickamauga Campaign—a reply to General Martin. (search)
eneral Pegram. This presents you a fine opportunity of striking Crittenden in detail, and I hope you will avail yourself of it at daylight to-morrow. This division crushed, and the others are yours. We can then turn on the force in the Cove. Wheeler's cavalry will move on Wilder so as to cover your right. I shall be delighted to hear of your success. Very truly yours, Braxton Bragg. headquarters army of Tennessee, Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12th, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Ceneral Pegram. This presents you a fine opportunity of striking Crittenden in detail, and I hope you will avail yourself of it at daylight to-morrow. This division crushed, and the others are yours. We can then turn on the force in the cove. Wheeler's cavalry will move on Wilder so as to cover your right. I shall be delighted to hear of your success. Very truly yours, Braxton Bragg. To attack at daylight on the 13th. Upon further information, the order was renewed in two notes, at