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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for R. T. Wheeler or search for R. T. Wheeler in all documents.

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r to risk his all in its defense than himself. On February 1, 1861, the convention passed the ordinance of secession. Before taking the vote the governor and other executive officers and justices of the Supreme court were invited to be present, and the members of the legislature entered the hall which had been crowded by citizens to witness the voting. Governor Houston appeared, and, with Lieut.-Gov. Ed Clark, was seated on the right of the president. To the left were seated Chief-Justice R. T. Wheeler and General McQueen, commissioner to the convention from South Carolina. Thus, with appropriate ceremony and great solemnity, the roll was called, and responses made by each member of the convention, resulting in 167 votes for secession and 7 votes against it. By direction of the convention the president sent letters enclosing copies of the ordinance to Senators Wigfall and Hemphill, and Representative A. J. Hamilton, then in Congress, and to each one of the governors of the slav