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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 83 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for William W. Wheeler or search for William W. Wheeler in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
he Natant and directed Lieutenant Cornwell, her commanding officer, to drop down to our assistance and take us in tow. This order was given through our surgeon, Dr. Wheeler, who, at great personal risk, went forward and passed it along. Cornwell was prompt and efficient in obeying the order, under a heavy fire, and he soon had us ng been brought into service, its commander was directed to lie by the Patapsco on leaving the flag-ship. The barge was to stop alongside the former vessel for Dr. Wheeler, as we had no medical officer with us. We finally shoved off, and after the necessary short delay by the Patapsco while the surgeon was making his preparatiodied of yellow fever in the West Indies--were close friends, and alike in those qualities that adorn humanity and make heroes of men. Lieutenant F. W. Bunce and Dr. Wheeler, both of the Patapsco, in this affair sustained the high reputation they had already earned on every occasion when the Patapsco had been engaged on perilous ser
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
posed, must have lost heavily — the more because American soldiers are not to be driven back without severe losses. General Wheeler had a very handsome affair of cavalry near Varnell's Station, the same day, in which he captured 100 prisoners, inclward Resaca. General Polk, who had just reached that place with Loring's division, was charged with its defense. General Wheeler was directed to move next morning with all the available cavalry around the north end of Rocky-face, to learn if a gry vigorous attack being made on Hindman's division of Hood's corps, which was handsomely repulsed. In the meantime General Wheeler was directed to ascertain the position and formation of the Federal left. His report indicating that these were notrs. The army abandoned the ground before daybreak and crossed the Etowah after noon, and encamped near the railroad. Wheeler's cavalry was placed in observation above, and Jackson's below our main body. No movement of the enemy was discovered
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
R. H. Dunn, Col. Wm. Cross, Maj. R. H. Dunn; 6th Tenn., Col. J. A. Cooper, Maj. Edward Maynard, Capt. Marcus D. Bearden, Capt. William Ausmus; 91st Ind. (transferred to Third Brigade, Second Division, August llth), Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Butterfield, Col. John Mehringer. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Milo S. Hascall, Col. John R. Bond, Col. William E. Hobson, Col. J. R. Bond: 107th Ill., Maj. Uriah M. Laurance, Lieut.-Col. Francis H. Lowry; 23d Mich., Lieut.-Col. Oliver L,. Spaulding, Maj. William W. Wheeler; 45th Ohio (transferred to First Brigade, June 8th, and to Second Brigade, First Division, Fourth Corps, June 22d), Col. Benjamin P. Runkle, Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Butterfield, Capt. John H. Humphrey; 111th Ohio, Col. John R. Bond, Lieut.-Col. Isaac R. Sherwood; 118th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Thomas L. Young, Capt. Edgar Sowers, Capt. William Kennedy, Capt. Rudolph Reul, Capt. Edgar Sowers. Third Brigade (joined May 28th and designated as Provisional Brigade to June 8th), Col. Silas A. Str
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
ot end till Gresham's division, on McPherson's left, had gone diagonally toward Atlanta, sweeping the hostile cavalry of Wheeler before it past the Augusta railroad, and skirmishing up against an open knob denominated Bald Hill. General Gresham, a fine officer, was severely wounded during his brisk movement. Wheeler had made a desperate and successful stand here, and soon after, in the evening, the division (Cleburne's) which was taken from Newton's sorely handled front was brought hither anKilpatrick, we made the march rapidly enough, considering the endless plague of the enemy's horse artillery supported by Wheeler's cavalry, and the time it took us to break up the West Point railroad. At Renfro Place we were to encamp on the night I asked Estes if he could keep the enemy in motion. He gave a sanguine reply, and galloped off at the head of his men. Wheeler's rear-guard was surprised, and hurried toward the river. Hazen's infantry followed, forgetting their fatigue in the ex
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
a short period. Through the vigilance of General Wheeler I received information, during the night lity to hold intact the road to Macon. General Wheeler started on the 27th of July in pursuit ofts upon the Macon road to the effect that General Wheeler had successfully checked the enemy at Latwed in pursuit and Lewis returned to Atlanta, Wheeler moved, across from Latimer's, with a portion at Newnan, and were there held in check till Wheeler's and Jackson's troops came up; whereupon theation as to compel us to evacuate Atlanta. Wheeler and Iverson having thus thoroughly crippled tpare, and expedite them, under the command of Wheeler, against Sherman's railroad to Nashville; at destruction of Sherman's road, I ordered General Wheeler, with 4500 men, to begin operations at onted great damage upon the enemy. Forrest and Wheeler accomplished all but the impossible with theiombardment. The 19th, nigh two weeks after Wheeler's departure with about one-half of our cavalr[8 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
U. S. C. T., Col. J. A. Hottenstein; 100th U. S. C. T., Maj. Collin Ford; 1st Kan. Battery, Capt. Marcus D. Tenney, Brigade loss: k, 77; w, 390; m, 1==468. Post of Nashville, Brig.-Gen. John F. Miller. Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Corps, Col. Edwin C. Mason: 142d Ind., Col. John M. Comparet; 45th N. Y., Col. Adolphus Dobke; 176th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. William B. Nesbitt; 179th Ohio, Col. Harley H. Sage; 182d Ohio, Col. Lewis Butler. Unattached: 3d Ky.,--; 28th Mich., Col. William W. Wheeler; 173d Ohio, Col. John R. Hurd; 78th Pa. (detachment), Lieut.-Col. Henry W. Torbett; Veteran Reserve Corps, Col. Frank P. Cahill; 44th Wis. (battalion), Lieut.-Col. Oliver C. Bissell; 45th Wis. (battalion),--. garrison artillery, Maj. John J. Ely: 2d Ind., Capt. James S. Whicher; 4th Ind., Capt. Benjamin F. Johnson; 12th Ind., Capt. James E. White; 21st Ind., Capt. Abram P. Andrew; 22d Ind., Capt. Edward W. Nicholson; 24th Ind., Lieut. Hiram Allen; F, 1st Mich., Capt. Byron D. Pad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 15.100 (search)
State. That night I withdrew my command to the intrenchments at Griffin. Early on the 16th Wheeler's cavalry was jammed back to our position, and the Federals made serious demonstrations on our at place. In the meantime Sherman had commenced crossing to the east side of the Ocmulgee, and Wheeler had moved over that river. The next day I withdrew to Macon, in time to assist in repelling a formidable demonstration against East Macon, in which the Federals succeeded in forcing General Wheeler, with a portion of his command, to the bank of the Ocmulgee, in rear of our fortifications. Dutifications of East Macon; or, if necessary, toward the south in the direction already taken by Wheeler's cavalry. Contrary to my instructions the militia became engaged about one mile beyond Griswo General Sherman's army was steadily moving through Georgia. The Confederate cavalry under General Wheeler restricted the eccentric movements and depredations of the Federal cavalry under General Ki
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Marching through Georgia and the Carolinas. (search)
re all old campaigners, so that a brush with the militia now and then or with Hardee's troops made no unusual delay; and Wheeler's cavalry was soon disposed of. We were expected to make fifteen miles a day; to corduroy the roads where necessary; to ance guard, for they formed virtually a curtain of mounted infantry screening us from the inquisitive eyes of parties of Wheeler's cavalry, with whom they did not hesitate to engage when it was a question of a rich plantation. When compelled to rerrupted. The sun grew dim, and the rain came and continued. A few of our excellent foragers were reported captured by Wheeler's cavalry, while we sank deeper and deeper in the mud as we approached the Salkehatchie Swamp, which lay between us and fee-coolers of the Army of the Potomac were archangels compared to our bummers,/ who often fell to the tender mercies of Wheeler's cavalry, and were never heard of again, earning a fate richly deserved. On arriving within easy distance of the Cap
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The failure to capture Hardee. (search)
n the South Carolina bank. Without a pontoon-bridge or other means of getting away, he was relying only on three very small steamboats. The only troops he had on the Carolina bank were a small force of light artillery and Ferguson's brigade of Wheeler's cavalry, numbering not more than 1000 men. At this time Beauregard's Military division of the West did not embrace the department of General Hardee, although he had authority and discretion there, in an emergency. Therefore he had gone to Chae conveyance the distance along which the railroad had been broken by Sherman near Savannah, my wagon and pair of horses being transported between the breaks in freight-cars. He found the pontoon-bridge only about one-third constructed, some of Wheeler's cavalry having destroyed a number of rice-flats collected, supposing they had been gathered by Sherman for the crossing of the river. But the work was prosecuted with such vigor by the chief engineer, Colonel John G. Clarke, in person, that b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
pt. Edward S. Pullen. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. George W. Schofield, Capt. Giles J. Cockerill. first division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas H. Ruger. First Brigade, Col. Isaac N. Stiles: 120th Ind., Col. Allen W. Prather; 124th Ind., Col. John M. Orr; 128th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Jasper Packard; 180th Ohio, Col. Willard Warner. Second Brigade, Col. John C. McQuiston: 123d Ind., Lieut.-Col. Dewitt C. Walters; 129th Ind., Col. Charles A. Zollinger; 130th Ind., Col. Charles S. Parrish; 28th Mich., Col. William W. Wheeler. Third Brigade, Col. Minor T. Thomas: 25th Mass. (assigned April 2d), Lieut.-Col. James Tucker; 8th Minn., Maj. George A. Camp; 174th Ohio, Col. John S. Jones; 178th Ohio, Col. Joab A. Stafford. Artillery: 22d Ind. (transferred to First Division, Tenth Corps, April 5th), Lieut. George W. Alexander: F, 1st Mich. (ordered to New Berne April 6th), Capt. Byron D. Paddock; Elgin, Ill. (assigned April 8th), Capt. Andrew M. Wood. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Nathaniel C. McLean, Col. Orl