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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 29 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 26 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for William Whewell or search for William Whewell in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
several times to dine with him,—once in company with Professor Whewell,—and expressed his regard by other attentions. Sumne fell asleep. At the same dinner last week, I met Hallam, Whewell, Babbage, Lyell, Sir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchiso I then go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectithe only guest here,—during the last four we have had Professor Whewell,—so that I can describe to you what was simply the fa university, and visited the various colleges. Dined with Whewell, William Whewell, D. D., 1795-1866; master of Trinity CWilliam Whewell, D. D., 1795-1866; master of Trinity College, and author of scientific works. and met a large company; next day dined in hall at Trinity, and then repaired to theius; By the invitation of A. Thurtell. breakfasted with Whewell, Henslow, and Peacock. George Peacock, 1790-1858; Profeton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the chur
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
Stuart Mill, 1806-1873. McCulloch, John Ramsay McCulloch, 1789-1864; author of the Dictionary of Commerce and Commercial Navigation. Spring Rice, Lord Lansdowne, &c. On the next day I commence my pilgrimage to Oxford, where I pass four days, and those four are engaged: first, to Sir Charles Vaughan, at All Souls; second, to my friend Ingham, M. P., at Oriel; third, to Dr. Hampden, at Christ Church; fourth, to Wortley, at Merton. I then go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectionate letter from Lord Morpeth, in which he enclosed a letter of introduction to the Countess of Granville, Lady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Pari
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
ry. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts of Burke; after dinner, there were about thirty musicians who came from Peterborough, and in the hall alternately played and sang. Quite early the family retired; but Milton, in a distant wing of the house, had provided what he called a jollification on my account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed before the cock crew. Hunting son
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, e full of warm admiration of the author. Kind regards to Mrs. Greenleaf, and thanks for her letter. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor William Whewell, London. 2 Vigo Street, Jan. 23, 1839. dear Mr. Whewell,—I am so knocked up with a cold that I shall not venture to your dinner to-day. Give me my oMr. Whewell,—I am so knocked up with a cold that I shall not venture to your dinner to-day. Give me my own crystal weather, rather than your murky, foggy days,—freighted with colds, catarrhs, and death. I have caught three dismal colds in the space of six weeks; all which is a monition to me to run away, and get nearer to the sun. I shall, however, be in town when you return to wind up the Geological year, and hope to have the pleas<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
rds to Mrs. Greenough, and remember me to your brother, and to Wilde and Powers. Kenyon enjoyed himself very much among you. He has written to me of you all with great praise. Believe me, ever sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor William Whewell, Cambridge, England. Boston, Oct. 17, 1840. my dear Whewell,—I have taken the great liberty of introducing to you by letter a countryman of mine, and now write to speak to you of him more particularly than I did in my letter. It isWhewell,—I have taken the great liberty of introducing to you by letter a countryman of mine, and now write to speak to you of him more particularly than I did in my letter. It is Mr. President Wayland, the head of a seminary of learning at Providence, in Rhode Island, called Brown University,—a man of strong native powers and considerable acquisitions, particularly in political economy and ethics, on which he has written very well. He is a Baptist clergyman, and the Bishop of that denomination. A reference to his eminence in a Church which has no Bishops. His object in visiting England is to observe and study your institutions of learning,—schools, colleges, all,