Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William D. Whipple or search for William D. Whipple in all documents.

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n order was issued from my headquarters assuming command. The position of the different corps of the army was as follows: First, Second, and Fifth corps, near Warrenton. Sixth corps, at New Baltimore. Ninth corps, with Stoneman's and Whipple's divisions, on both sides of the river, in the neighborhood of Waterloo. Eleventh corps, at Gainsville, New Baltimore, and the Gap. Pleasonton at Jefferson and Amissville, with advance on Hazel River. Bayard at Rappahannock Station and Parke, Chief of Staff. headquarters, Army of the Potomac, December 13, 1862--7 A. M. Major-General Joseph Hooker, commanding Center Division, Army of the Potomac: The General commanding directs that you place General Butterfield's corps and Whipple's division in position to cross at a moment's notice at the three upper bridges, in support of the other troops over the river; and the two remaining divisions of General Stoneman's corps in readiness to cross at the lower ford in support of Gen
o the right then to the left, now advances, now retires, but still bleeds on, floats, and flaps our flag so plainly that I half imagine I can hear the rustle of its silken folds. For one long hour this contest raged, and these sturdy heroes that would not waver labored and struggled to gain the top. The odds was too great, however, and the column, torn and mangled, fell back to our works on the ridge. A party of officers, among whom were General Schofield, Palmer, Thomas, Elliott, and Whipple, were standing in the open field to which I have referred, just in front of the gap in the ridge; a rebel gunner discovering the group trained his gun and sent a round shot whizzing within a few feet of the knarled and knotty old war horse, on whose countenance and gray hairs I never look but in reverence, for there is sound, tried, genuine military ability. The effect of the shot after deigning first to spare the head of Captain Snodgrass, that it actually endangered, was to cause what th
attalion, Fourteenth army corps, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C. H. Grosvenor, and the Twentieth Indiana and Eighteenth Ohio batteries to attack the enemy's right, employ his forces at that point, and as far as possible by my movements to mislead him as to real point of attack. The fog was very dense, and delayed, somewhat, movements on the entire line. A few minutes before eight, when the fog had partially cleared away, and all my dispositions had been made for attack, Brigadier-General W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff of the Department of the Cumberland, instructed me, by order of Major-General Thomas, as to the time of attack. At eight o'clock, the time designated, the attack was made by the troops of Colonel Morgan and Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor, Colonel Morgan commanding — advancing from the Murfreesboro turnpike towards Riddler's Hill, rapidly driving in the pickets of the enemy and assaulting his line of works between the U. and C. railroad and the Murfreesboro turnpik
attalion, Fourteenth army corps, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel C. H. Grosvenor, and the Twentieth Indiana and Eighteenth Ohio batteries to attack the enemy's right, employ his forces at that point, and as far as possible by my movements to mislead him as to real point of attack. The fog was very dense, and delayed, somewhat, movements on the entire line. A few minutes before eight, when the fog had partially cleared away, and all my dispositions had been made for attack, Brigadier-General W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff of the Department of the Cumberland, instructed me, by order of Major-General Thomas, as to the time of attack. At eight o'clock, the time designated, the attack was made by the troops of Colonel Morgan and Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor, Colonel Morgan commanding — advancing from the Murfreesboro turnpike towards Riddler's Hill, rapidly driving in the pickets of the enemy and assaulting his line of works between the U. and C. railroad and the Murfreesboro turnpik
t, and of the Second brigade, First division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, John H. King, Brigadier-General. Brigadier-General W. D. Whipple, A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland. camp Eighteenth United States infantry, Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, February 25, 1865. BBrigadier-General W. D. Whipple, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department Cumberland: I respectfully submit the following report of the operations of the detachment of the Eighteenth United States infantry, embracing sixteen companies of the First, Second and Third battalions, while under my command during the Atlanta campaign, fro fight. There were captured from the enemy in this battle eighteen stands of colors and five thousand stands of arms. By command of Major-General Thomas. W. D. Whipple, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Howard's order. headquarters Department and Army of the Tennessee, East Point, Ga., September 9, 1864. General F
ns unexpectedly from General Sherman in September to repair to Tennessee, and assume general control of the defenses of our line of communication in the rear of the Army of the Mississippi, and not anticipating a separation from my immediate command, the greater number of my staff officers were left behind at Atlanta, and did not have an opportunity to join me, after General Sherman determined on making his march through Georgia, before the communications were cut. I had with me Brigadier-General W. D. Whipple, my Chief of Staff; Surgeon G. E. Cooper, Medical Director; Captains Henry Stone, Henry M. Cist, and Robert H. Ramsay, Assistant Adjutants-General; Captain Henry Bernan, Acting Chief Commissary; Captains John P. Willard and S. C. Kellogg, Aids-de-Camp; and Lieutenant M. Kelly, Chief of Couriers; all of whom rendered important service during the battles of the fifteenth and sixteenth, and during the pursuit. I cordially commend their services to favorable consideration. There
eft flank and rear. The left of the Eighth Minnesota was thrown slightly to the rear, and two companies of the Second Minnesota cavalry dismounted and deployed still further to the left in that direction. At this time large numbers of Indians were passing in that direction, and attacked the rear guard of the main train which was promptly repulsed by the guard, which consisted of companies B and D Eighth Minnesota volunteers, and company B, Second Minnesota cavalry, and a shell from Lieutenant Whipple's six-pounder. At this time Colonel McLaren with two more companies of his regiment were sent to the front, immediately on the left of the Eighth regiment, when they were dismounted and took possession of a range of sharp hills, which was rapidly done by a sharp skirmish. At this point the left of the whole line was halted and the right thrown forward. After a few minutes the whole line advanced in the same direction, the whole brigade moving as rapidly as possible, much of the ti
also the report of Major Hubbard, commanding pontoon train, and Major C. L. Greene, Provost-Marshal. If not inconsistent with the customs of service and the views of the War Department, I have the honor to request that the reports of division and brigade commanders may be published in the Army and Navy Journal or Official Gazette. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. H. Wilson, Brevet Major-General. headquarters cavalry corps, M. D. M., Macon, Ga., June 29, 1865. Brigadier-General Wm. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, and Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Department of the Cumberland. General — My last general report of operations dated at Gravelly Springs, Alabama, February eighth, 1865, completed the history of the Cavalry corps, Military Division of the Mississippi, from its organization to that date. In pursuance of instructions from General Thomas, I was authorized, after the escape of Hood to the south side of the Tennessee river, to assemble the available