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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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of the first three to plant the Stars and Stripes on the walls of Monterey, in Mexico; and Capt. Ross, of Ironton, an intelligent Scotchman. Captain Thomas, of Higginsport, Ohio, is supposed to be taken; and also Dr. Morris, of Ironton, the first Surgeon. The rebels also arrested and took with them the following Union citizens, after having first taken and destroyed their goods: Wm. Dowthit, merchant, and his son; Dr. Rouse, druggist, who was also a Commissioner of the Federal Court; Albert White, and perhaps some others. At Barboursville they captured John W. Alford, candidate for the Legislature; Matthew Thompson and all his goods; old Mr. Kyle and Morey. These prisoners were lashed together and compelled to walk. Among their other cruelties, I will mention one incident: James E. Wood, a citizen of the place for many years, but now in the army, had his hand shot off. He was then run over by the cavalry and his hips put out of place, but he managed to get to the middle of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.51 (search)
re. She urged on her steed, and crying out, Come on, Doctor, here goes Pocahontas, dashed ahead of him and won the race. She died March 7, 1891, in Alexandria, Va.; aged, seventy-eight years. There was also a third daughter, who became Mrs. Albert White. She lived mostly in Washington, but was married here, at her mother's, and I witnessed the ceremony. Mr. White was United States Senator from the State of Indiana. So much for the maidens who enjoyed and adorned the old Brockenbrough Mr. White was United States Senator from the State of Indiana. So much for the maidens who enjoyed and adorned the old Brockenbrough mansion and its environments. Now for the mansion itself. Mr. Morson the owner. Dr. Brockenbrough removed from Richmond to the Warm Springs and early in the year 1844 sold his residence here. So that about eighteen years elapsed between that date and the time at which President Davis and family were domiciled in it. During that period great changes were wrought in the building. The purchaser of it for $20, 0000 was Mr. James M. Morson, who was a gentleman of ambition and taste, and of