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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
Strafford: By the help of some of your lordship's good friends and mine, I have sent a hopeful colony into Maryland, with a fair and favorable expectation of good success, without any great prejudice to myself, in respect that many others are joined with me in the adventure. There are two of my brothers, with very near twenty other gentlemen of very good fashion, and 300 laboring men. As most of the latter took the oath of allegiance before sailing, they were probably Protestants. Father Andrew White, a Jesuit priest, accompanied the expedition. They sailed from the Isle of Wight, and took the tedious southern route by way of the Canaries. The vessels were separated by a furious gale, but met at Bermuda, whence the emigrants went to the Chesapeake, founded a settlement, and established a government under the charter, which was nearly the same in form as all charters then granted (see Maryland). It conferred on the proprietor absolute ownership of the territory, and also the civi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, John, 1744- (search)
ay be effectually secured by the means proposed; namely, the enjoyment of our inalienable rights. The fight of Osawatomie. Early in the morning of Aug. 30 the enemy's scouts approached to within one mile and a half of the western boundary of the town of Osawatomie. At this place my son Frederick (who was not attached to my force) had lodged, with some four other young men from Lawrence, and a young man named Garrison, from Middle Creek. The scouts, led by a pro-slavery preacher named White, shot my son dead in the road, while he — as I have since ascertained — supposed them to be friendly. At the same time they butchered Mr. Garrison, and badly mangled one of the young men from Lawrence, who came with my son, leaving him for dead. This was not far from sunrise. I had stopped during the night about two and one-half miles from them, and nearly one mile from Osawatomie. I had no organized force, but only some twelve or fifteen new recruits, who were ordered to leave their pre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Calvert, Leonard (search)
vessels (Ark and Dove), and over 300 emigrants. the Ark was a ship of 300 tons, and the Dove a pinnace of 50 tons. Among the company were two Jesuit priests, Andrew White and John Altham. At religious ceremonies performed at the time of departure, the expedition was committed to the protection of God especially, and of His mosty, and awed into reverence for the white men by the flash and roar of cannon, which they regarded as lightning and thunder. The successful medical services of Father White in curing a sick Indian king gained the profound respect of these children of the forest. He and his queen and three daughters were baptized by Father White, Father White, and became members of the Christian Church. William Claiborne, an earlier settler on Kent Island, in the Chesapeake, gave Calvert much trouble, and was abetted in his course by the Virginia authorities, who regarded the Maryland colonists as intruders. He was driven away, and his property was confiscated. But he was a thorn in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
nd a refuge there. Armed with this charter, young Lord Baltimore set about the business of colonizing his domain. He The Landing on Blackstone Island. appointed his half-brother, Leonard Calvert (q. v.), governor, and Nov. 22, 1633, that kinsman and another brother, with very near twenty other gentlemen of very good fashion and 300 laboringmen (so Lord Baltimore wrote to Wentworth), sailed from Cowes, Isle of Wight, in two vessels, the Ark and Dove, accompanied by two Jesuit priests, Andrew White and John Altham. The Calverts and the other gentlemen, and some of the laboring-men, were Roman Catholics, but a greater portion of the latter were Protestants. After a terribly tempestuous voyage, in which the vessels were separated, they met at Barbadoes and finally entered the broad mouth of the Potomac River, in February, 1634. They sailed up the Potomac, and upon Blackstone Island (which they named St. Clement's) they landed, performed religious ceremonies, and were visited by the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White, Andrew 1579-1656 (search)
White, Andrew 1579-1656 Clergyman; born in London, England, presumably in 1579; was ordained a priest in 1605; became a Jesuit in 1609; accompanied Lord Baltimore to America in 1633; labored among the Piscataway and Patuxent Indians, and translated into the Indian language a catechism, grammar, and vocabulary. His publications include Extracts from the letters of missionaries; Narrative of travels in Maryland; Declaration to the colonies by Lord Baltimore. He died in London, England, Dec. 27, 1656.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
Population in 1860, 907; in 1865, 908. Valuation in 1860, $476,382; in 1865, $470,125. The selectmen in 1861 were Andrew White, Park Warner, Phineas D. Barton; in 1862, Andrew White, William W. Ferry, Simeon C. Stebbins; in 1863, Simeon C. StebbAndrew White, William W. Ferry, Simeon C. Stebbins; in 1863, Simeon C. Stebbins, Francis E. Taylor, James M. Barton; in 1864, Andrew White, C. C. Aldrich, Charles F. Clark; in 1865, Andrew White, James M. Barton, Frederick Taylor. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Philo Chapin. 1861White, C. C. Aldrich, Charles F. Clark; in 1865, Andrew White, James M. Barton, Frederick Taylor. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Philo Chapin. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year in regard to the war. 1862. July 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years, who shall enlist and be creditAndrew White, James M. Barton, Frederick Taylor. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Philo Chapin. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year in regard to the war. 1862. July 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town; and on the 22d of August the same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1864. August 3d, The bounty to be paid to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-f
s Taylor. John Tidd. Joseph Trask. Stephen Tucker. Ebenezer Tufts. John Tufts. Jonathan Tufts. Nathan Tufts. Nathaniel Tufts. Samuel Tufts. George Turner. Wait Turner. Elijah Tuttle. Joseph Tuttle. John Vertys. John Vila. Thomas Wait. Edward Walker. Israel Walton. William Warland. Daniel Watson. Isaac Watson. William Watson. Ezra Welch. John Welch. Elijah Weld. Henry Weld. Job Wetherell. Thomas Wheeler. Andrew White. James White. John Whiting. Andrew Whitney. Nathaniel R. Whitney. Oliver Whitney. Timothy Whitney. Francis Whittemore. Nathan Whittemore. Samuel Whittemore, Jr. Thomas Whittemore. James Williams. Nathaniel Williams. Timothy Willison. George Wilson. Josiah Wilson. Thomas Wilson. William Wilton. Henry Win ship. Isaac Winship. John Winship. Coolidge Wood. Charles Wyman. Phipps Wyman. James Yates. The war against Great B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
McCrea, Private E. J. Ball, A. M. Howell, Private J. M. Gibbs, D. H. Stovall, J. L. Vaughan. Co. F. 4th Sergeant E. C. Sanders, 5th Sergeant J. E. Batts, 2d Corporal J. M. Winstead, 3d Corporal J. H. Grantt, Private J. A. Wheeler, W. M. Brown, G. W. Tarpley. Co. G. Private S. Tucker. Co. H. Private W. T. Benson, J. J. Davis, T. Giggs, T. J. Ham, Private R. F. Justis, H. A. Justis, H. J. Daniel. [52] Twenty-fifth Tennessee Regiment. Co. A. Private Andrew White. Co. B. Private J. M. Richardson. Co. C. Private M. V. Slatten, Private Jos. Rutledge. Co. D. Sergeant J. F. Lane, Corporal J. F. Sewell, Private J. M. Wilson, Private W. H. McCormack, J. L. Mathews, J. J. Harrison. Co. E. Private J. S. Love. Co. F. Corporal C. M. Crawall, Corporal Chas. Bradford. Co. H. Private J. L. McCormack. Co. I. Corporal H. R. Terry, J. L. Pryor, Private H. E. Hurley, Private W. C. Terry, W. J. Terry. Co. K. Private
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1861., [Electronic resource], The "Assassination" of Col. Flisworth, (search)
. In Virginia and the other Confederate States, all contributions have been free will offerings; in New York and other abolition localities of the North, whatever has been given by "merchant princes," "retired wealthy snobs, " and others, has been doled out under the influence of a panic which threatened the disruption of the whole social Fabria. The Yankees would rather part with their blood than gold. They had reluctantly to yield a little gold to save much. Of the two letters alluded to as having been received by the Governor, one was written by Dr. J. Prosser Tabb, of Gloucester, and pledges the writer to give $1,000 this year to the cause of Old Virginia, enclosed was a check for $250, the balance to follow in quarterly instalments. We may remark that Dr. Tabb offered to give the $230 during every three months the war should continue. The second letter received by the Governor was from Andrew White, Esq., of Lynchburg, enclosing his chock for $500 for the use of the State.