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Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 8 0 Browse Search
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Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908,
Union Square
and its neighborhood about the year 1846. (search)
o not recall any dwellings. At the northeast corner of the avenue and Prospect street was the house of Benjamin F. Ricker, mason, father of Captain Melvin B. Ricker, of our fire department; east of this was the house built by John C. Giles, already spoken of, later owned by Samuel Thompson, flour inspector, a colored man, said to have been one of the best flour judges in Boston, a gentleman of dignified manner. The blacksmith shop of Seward Dodge, the paint shop of J. Q. Twombly, and Artemas White's harness shop, all between Union square and Prospect street, on the south side of Somerville avenue, and the house of Abraham Welch, superintendent of town streets, were, I think, all built later than 1846. Mr. Dodge was councilman and later alderman of the city, and Mr. Twombly was prominent in the Universalist society, and a muchrespected citizen. On Prospect street, north of the railroad, were the houses of David A. Sanborn, in one of which he afterwards lived; in another, a double
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War. (search)
ch passed through their city. This dinner was at Cooper-Shop Eating House, a place which many Northern soldiers must remember. We arrived in Washington September 8, and the next day went to Camp Chase at Arlington. About September 16 we marched, according to orders, towards Edward's Ferry, Md. The night of September 18 we reached Poolsville. Our course was along the upper Potomac, and the object of the expedition was to guard the river fords and stop the rebels, notably a body known as White's guerrillas, from making raids into Maryland. From Poolsville we marched five miles to Edward's Ferry, where we camped, without tents, for five weeks. The river was picketed as far as Conrad's Ferry, seven miles up stream. In October we marched back towards Washington, eight miles to Seneca, where we camped about a week, thence to Muddy Branch, where we remained until November 13. On the way back, at Offert's Cross Roads, death entered our ranks for the first time, and we lost Private Su
shington Street Bridge, 33. Webster Avenue, 6, 14, 33, 37, 40. Welch, Abraham, 13. Wellington Bridge, 74. Wellington-Wild Coal Office, 32. West End, 26. 28, 29, 30, 31, 49. Weston, Dr., 5. Weston Family, 3. Westwood Road, 12. White, Artemas, 13. White Oak Swamp, 64. White Plain, Va., 21. White's Guerrillas, 18. Whitmore, Joseph, 22, 36. Whitmore, William H., 51. Whitridge, Elizabeth P., 39. Wilderness, Battle of the, 56. Wilderness, Battlefield of the, 44, 45. WilWhite's Guerrillas, 18. Whitmore, Joseph, 22, 36. Whitmore, William H., 51. Whitridge, Elizabeth P., 39. Wilderness, Battle of the, 56. Wilderness, Battlefield of the, 44, 45. Wildridge's Hill, 29, 51, 52. Willard, —, 13. Willard C. Kinsley Post, 139, G. A. R., 3. Williams, Charles, Jr., 41. Williamsport, Md., 20. Wilson,———, 10. Wilson, Richard, 28, 31. Winter Hill, 4. 5, 8, 50. 51, 52, 75. Winter Hill Eagle, 55. Winter Hill Lodge, Knights of Honor. 3. Winter Hill Road, 53. Winter Hill Universalist Church, 4. Winthrop Avenue. 25, 29. Winthrop, John, 28, 79, 80. Woburn, Mass., 29. 30, 31, 52. Woolrych, John. 28. Wyatt, G. W., 14. Wyman