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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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e delivered a most interesting address. He mentioned with great feeling the death of Mr. John A. Washington, of Mount Vernon, who fell at Cheat Mountain a few days ago, while, with some other officers, he was observing the movements of Rosecranz. It is heart-rending to hear of the number of valuable lives which are lost in this cruel war. Sept. 25th, 1861. The last two days spent with pleasant friendsone day with Miss M. M., and the other with my old acquaintance, Mrs. Dr. F., of the White post. These ladies, like all others, are busy for the soldiers. To-day I received a copy of Headley Vicars, abridged for the camp, by my friend J. J. Mr. M. will take it to-morrow to the camp, when he goes with the wagon. To-day we have been helping the Bishop to pack a barrel of grapes, and another with tomatoes and other fresh vegetables; and yet another Mrs. M. has packed with bread, biscuit, and a variety of things for the sick. The Briars , October 2d, 1861. We returned yesterd
il communication very uncertain. From my own family boys we have not heard, and we are willing to believe that no news is good news. Two more of the dear ones over whose youth we so anxiously watched have fallen-Hill Carter, of Shirley, and Benjamin White, of Charlestown, Jefferson County. Thank God, they were both Christians! My heart aches for their parents. The last was an only son, and justly the pride and joy of his household. His parents are in the enemy's lines. O Lord, uphold that instantly killed. The General fell to the ground, and remained there, unable to move, until he was captured by the enemy. He was subsequently incarcerated in Fort Delaware. Having learned from the soldier, while on his back, that his name was White, from Westmoreland County, Virginia, as soon as the General was exchanged he inquired for the family, and found that the mother was a respectable widow who had had five sons on the field, but one of whom survived. He immediately wrote to her, ex
us in his holy keeping! We continue quite comfortable at home. Of course provisions are scarce; but, thanks to our country friends and relatives, we have never been obliged to give up meat entirely. My brother-in-law, Mr. N., has lately sent us twelve hams, so that we are much better supplied than most persons. Groceries are extremely high. We were fortunate in buying ten pounds of tea, when it only sold for $22 per pound. Coffee now sells for $12, and brown sugar at $10 per pound. White sugar is not to be thought of by persons of moderate means. Milk is very scarce and high, so that we have only had it once for many months; and we, the Colonel, Mr.--, and myself, are very glad to get a cup of tea, night and morning, sweetened with brown sugar, and without milk or cream. Before the war we would have scorned it, but now we enjoy it exceedingly, and feel ourselves very much blessed to have it. The girls have given up tea and coffee; I attempted to do it, and for several days
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
tizen of Provincetown, of the Thirty-third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. Provincetown, which is situated on the extreme end of Cape Cod, was one of the most exposed places on the coast. During the war, earth-works were erected by the Government, which were garrisoned by a company of volunteers. Sandwich Incorporated Sept. 3, 1639. Population in 1860, 4,479; in 1865, 4,105. Valuation in 1860, $1,644,433; in 1865, $1,699,105. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Mason White, Seth B. Wing, Isaiah Fish; in 1864, H. G. O. Ellis, Seth B. Wing, Isaiah Fish; in 1865, H. G. O. Ellis, Paul Wing, Isaiah Fish. The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was David C. Freeman; from June, 1863, and during 1864 and 1865, David C. Percival. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 11th of May; It is proper to state that a public meeting was held in April in the Town Hall, notice of which had been given b
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
uiting were $50,500.00. The total amount of money raised and expended by the entire county for State aid to the families of volunteers in the army and navy during the four years of the war, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was $553,043.12. Acushnet Formerly part of Fairhaven; incorporated Feb. 13, 1860. Population in 1860, 1,387; in 1865, 1,251. Valuation in 1860, $784,837; in 1865, $656,500. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Cyrus E. Clark, Benjamin Wilson, Benjamin White; in 1864 and 1865, Cyrus E. Clark, Walter Spooner, Pardon Tabor. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during each year of the war was Jabez Wood. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. At a legal town-meeting, held on the 19th of July, the town voted to pay each person who shall enlist in the military service for three years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
ser, George Dresser; in 1864, C. A. Packard, Alonzo Shaw, George Dresser; in 1865, C. A. Packard, Alvan Barrus, Joshua Knowlton. The town-clerk in 1861 was Benjamin White; in 1862, Alvan Barrus was elected and served until August 5th, when he enlisted and went to the war; Benjamin White was appointed to fill the vacancy; in 186Benjamin White was appointed to fill the vacancy; in 1863, Benjamin White; in 1864 and 1865, Joshua Knowlton. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Timothy P. Lyman; in 1862 and 1863, Henry H. Tilton; in 1864 and 1865, Joshua Knowlton. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider questions relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which it was voted to appropriate two hundredBenjamin White; in 1864 and 1865, Joshua Knowlton. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Timothy P. Lyman; in 1862 and 1863, Henry H. Tilton; in 1864 and 1865, Joshua Knowlton. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider questions relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which it was voted to appropriate two hundred dollars to be expended in recruiting volunteers; and C. A. Packard, H. H. Tilton, Hiram Packard, Daniel Williams, and Francis Jepson were chosen a committee to attend to the same. November 5th, Voted, to furnish aid to the families of those citizens of the town who have enlisted, or may hereafter enlist, in the military service
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
through the head while pursuing the retreating Federals. Company A; D. McCracken, Company B; John Mingea, Company B; W. A. Jelks, Company B; and R. B. Barnes, Company F; and forty-seven wounded, two of whom, it is thought, are mortally wounded—Ben. White, Company C, and William Delbridge, Company I. Among the wounded are Captain Stephen White, Company C; Sergeant George Morrison, George J. Morrison, of Petersburg. Company A; and private John Lee, of Company E. There were unfortunately threyour places! Get in your places! Suddenly one or two of the regiments to my right opened fire. This firing soon ceased, as the men found out they were firing upon their friends, but not until they had killed General Jenkins, mortally wounded Ben. White, Benjamin B. White, Petersburg, Virginia. of the Twelfth Virginia, and wounded General Longstreet and others severely. So much time elapsed after the wounding of Longstreet and before General Anderson assumed command, the enemy had time
5.00; Michael Kane, 5,00; Patrick Larkin, 5.00; Leonard Miller, 5.00; John McCarty, No. 1, 5,00; John McCarty, No. 3,5.00; Robt. Morgan, 5.00; Stephen Mulcachie, 5.00; Chas. Murray, 5.00; James O'Conner, 5.00; John O'Donnel, 5.00; Joseph Perkins, 5.00; John C. Johnson, 5.00; James Kiley, 5.00; Michael Sullivan, 5.00; Samuel Wayts, 5.00; Thomas Williams, 10.00; Daniel Whitney, 6.00; Joseph Nichols, 5.00; Henry Fraeling, 5.00 Archie Scott, 5.00; James Shaughnessay, 5.00; John Devlin, 5.00; Benjamin White, 5.00; James C. Hamilton, 5.00; Daniel Corcoran, 5.00; John Cotter, 5.00; Daniel Ryan, 5.00; Henry Wilcox, 5.00; John Riggs, 5.00; C. M. Johnson, 5.00; John Reynolds, 5.00; Wm. Lithgo, 5.00; James Shenan, 5.00. Camp Wise, December, 1861. To James Burns, Tiger Rifles, New Orleans: Sir --We, the undersigned, members of the Ben McCulloch Rangers, do hereby sympathize with you in your misfortune, and, as a token of our respect, subscribe to your benefit, as follows: George